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Georges Livanos Georges Livanos "Le Grec"  by ericvola

Georges Livanos Alias Le Grec, King of the Calanques, Emperor in the Dolomites, 500 first ascents beyond Verticality. One of the aphorisms he always was found of: "Better one more peg than one man less… especially if that man is me!” Pure amateur, he put 25.000 pegs, opened 500 routes in the Calanques of Marseille, 40 in the Dolomites, around 20 in the Alps and repeated quite a number of big routes in the Alps and the Dolomites. Many of the great names of Alpinism did rope with him, Jean Franco, Maurice Herzog, Lionel Terray, Gaston Rébuffat, Jean Couzy,Michel Vaucher, Claudio Barbier, not to mention his Italian friends such as Gino Soldà, Armando da Roit, Beppi de Franchesch, Marcello Bonafede, Menegus, Stenico and many others particularly when they came in the Calanques.

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Chasing the Light Chasing the Light  by Mark Doiron

Photography is all about light. That should be patently obvious to even the most casual observer.

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Abalakov in history and in
ice Abalakov in history and in ice  by Liba Kopeckova

The Abalakov thread, or V-thread is ice protection named after Soviet climber Vitaly Abalakov. To know how to make a proper Abalakov (=v-thread) should be a requirement for anyone climbing multi-pitch ice routes. It is easy to create, it doesn’t require leaving expensive gear behind, e.g. rappeling on an ice screw, and it is very safe. I have used abalakov’s in anchors, even as an protection when running out of screws, and mostly it is used for rappel.

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A rebel plant - Helleborus
niger A rebel plant - Helleborus niger  by selinunte01

Autumn and winter is coming to central Europe and to the Alpine regions and with them the dying of the plants, the falling of the leaves, the decay of all what is sprouting, blossoming and producing fruits and seeds during spring and summer. Soon enough there is the first snow, covering the ground, giving a definite stop to plants life. Light your oven, prepare your skies and wait till springtime for the first tiny blossoms to reappear…… You are wrong!

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The
necessary and sometimes black art of getting down The necessary and sometimes black art of getting down  by ExcitableBoy

Standing on top of a summit, after congratulatory hugs and handshakes, I make it a point to say out loud, ‘We’re half way there.’ I say this not necessarily for my partner’s benefit, but for my own. Statistically, more accidents occur while descending mountains than climbing up them.

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An
interesting comparison between the driest year (2014) and the wettest year
(2011) in Yosemite national park An interesting comparison between the driest year (2014) and the wettest year (2011) in Yosemite national park  by kamran

On September 5th, 2011, a friend of mine and I climbed Mt. Conness in the eastern part of the Yosemite national park. The year 2011 was the wettest year on record in the north of Sierra-Nevada range. The scenery was spectacular. I don’t think anybody had ever seen that much snow in the month of September in Yosemite national park.

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Walking
with Mr. Muir Walking with Mr. Muir  by dwhike

"Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean." -John Muir

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Alpine
pioneers: the Alpine pioneers: the "Tschingel Company", a legendary team  by Silvia Mazzani

Dogs’ vocation for mountaineering is out of discussion. In the past the St Bernard, the kingsize dog from the St Bernard Hospice, which saved travelers crossing the Alps between Italy and Switzerland, when scattered in the ancient snowy nights, was long regarded as the only mountain dog. Who could forget the invincible Barry, founder of all the St Bernards, victim of his generosity, who after saving forty wayfarers was killed by the forty-first one? Actually the more recent history tells us about other brave dogs summiting peaks, climbing, crossing glaciers alone, finding people buried under an avalanche! Anyhow, nowadays Tschingel (Berner Oberland, CH 1865 - Dorking, UK 1879) still remains the most famous tailed-mountaineer of all the times! Indeed the star of Tschingel will shine forever in the history of alpinism, in reason of her value and her challenging mountain climbs.

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Rappel
Anchors: A few thoughts Rappel Anchors: A few thoughts  by Brian C

Going up results in coming back down and naturally, rappelling is an ever important part of climbing. In addition, many people use rappels that are not involved in technical climbing with some examples being canyoneering, sport rappelling and challenging scrambles. Since rappelling puts your well-being entirely at the mercy of the technical system that you have established, if any point of the system fails you are likely going to be injured (or worse). Rappel accidents occur every year due a wide variety of mostly avoidable scenarios and even experienced climbers fall prey.

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What is a Rock Glacier? What is a Rock Glacier?  by Alex Wood

What is a rock glacier? This term rock glacier is often thrown around loosely with little implication of the origin. This article is about rock glaciers, as you probably guessed. I wrote this as a report for one of my geology classes and have attempted to turn it into a readable article.

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