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Out of the Ashes - A New
Pine Ridge Emerges Out of the Ashes - A New Pine Ridge Emerges  by panhandletrails

Fortunately for Nebraska’s Pine Ridge region, the “three strikes and you are out” rule does not apply. Major forest fires in 1989, 2006 and 2012 devastated the forests and meadows of the region, drastically changing the landscape for a long time to come. If these major fires were not enough, there were numerous smaller fires in intervening years. Pine Ridge District Ranger Tim Buskirk reported that 90% of the woodlands in forest service lands in western Nebraska have been lost.

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Pioneering
Ship Rock Pioneering Ship Rock  by Brian C

This is a short piece I worked on about the history of climbing on Ship Rock. It was considered to be the last great challenge in North America and has a very vibrant history. This is not meant to be exhaustive and should only serve as a brief introduction.

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The Blood and Bones of the
Desert The Blood and Bones of the Desert  by Bob Sihler

It was March 1996, my first trip to Arches National Park. My brothers and I had hiked the popular and spectacular Devils Garden Trail to its terminus at Dark Angel, a beautiful pillar of red sandstone. Back at the trailhead, I had glancingly noticed a sign saying something about the crust being alive, but in my rush to get a jump on the dozens of other hikers getting ready to start out, I paid little attention and just hit the trail.

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Sixties
with Style Thirty: East of the Petit Capucin Sixties with Style Thirty: East of the Petit Capucin  by OsvaldoCardellina

The History of the two Capucins is fairly recent in relation to the development of the entire Mountaineering: it began just before the First World War and ends few years after the end of the Second with the conquest by Walter Bonatti and Luciano Ghigo of the East Wall of the Grand Capucin. Clearly, the events will also happen later, as the story of all the mountains of this world is infinite. But it is another story, because the current "Classic" now it is sold out.

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Layton Kor
- The Giant Layton Kor - The Giant  by Liba Kopeckova

Layton Kor was one of America’s greatest and most revered climbers. He came from a small town in Minnesota, born in 1938, and was a bricklayer by trade. He taught himself to climb by chopping steps with pickaxe up a clay embankment in Texas: “I’d seen the climbers in the movie with ice axes and I thought that as the way it was done”, he wrote. In the mid 50s, Kor’s parents relocated to Boulder, where the area is abundant with rocks. He put up many routes here as a teenager, especially Eldorado Canyon, Boulder Canyon, the Flatirons and Lumpy Ridge.

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Georges Livanos Georges Livanos "Le Grec"  by ericvola

Georges Livanos Alias Le Grec, King of the Calanques, Emperor in the Dolomites, 500 first ascents beyond Verticality. "The kind of man that nothing less than a ton of bricks could keep down: nineteen hundredweight would have been of no use.” Sir Francis Younghusband (The Epic of Mount Everest). Georges Livanos, born in 1922 from a Greek father and grand-father was 100% from Marseille, he loved to play his own part, that of colourfulness and humour at its best. One of the aphorisms he always was found of: "Better one more peg than one man less… especially if that man is me!”

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A pioneer
of the Northern Limestone Alps: Hermann von Barth A pioneer of the Northern Limestone Alps: Hermann von Barth  by selinunte01

The Alps are well developed and made accessible as far as possible. Highways, roads and railways are crisscrossing the valleys and the cols. Villages and towns are expanding. Countless accommodations are waiting for more and more tourists. Ski areas and their longing for more space and new attractions are conquering remote areas of yesterday.

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100 Years on the Timpanogos
Glacier 100 Years on the Timpanogos Glacier  by Scott

The "glacier" is somewhat of an unusual and interesting feature for Utah. A perhaps little known fact is that the glacier reportedly used to have some distinct (by Rockies standards) and visible crevasses before the "Dust Bowl Drought" of the 1930's. Some of the old photos are available at BYU or in Kelsey's book on Timpanogos, and a few are posted in the section below. Although the feature has been referred to as a glacier (sometimes affectionately) for many years, the status of the glacier/snowfield/icefield had been debated for just as long.

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Letter to an Old Friend Letter to an Old Friend  by Bob Sihler

There you were, bold against the snow in the Lamar Valley, ears erect, snout down, ready to pounce, listening for the self-betraying movement of your prey in its dug-out tunnels a few inches below. You paid not a bit of attention to me.

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Drinking Water in the
Backcountry Drinking Water in the Backcountry  by Enkidu

Travel in remote areas can often present hydration challenges that are often compounded by weather, elevation and exertion. Often times the only water available is from the nearest lake/stream or snow/ice. In certain instances these sources can be used successfully without any treatment. In other cases successful use requires some form of treatment.

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