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necessary and sometimes black art of getting down The necessary and sometimes black art of getting down  by ExcitableBoy

Standing on top of a summit, after congratulatory hugs and handshakes, I make it a point to say out loud, ‘We’re half way there.’ I say this not necessarily for my partner’s benefit, but for my own. Statistically, more accidents occur while descending mountains than climbing up them.

interesting comparison between the driest year (2014) and the wettest year
(2011) in Yosemite national park An interesting comparison between the driest year (2014) and the wettest year (2011) in Yosemite national park  by kamran

On September 5th, 2011, a friend of mine and I climbed Mt. Conness in the eastern part of the Yosemite national park. The year 2011 was the wettest year on record in the north of Sierra-Nevada range. The scenery was spectacular. I don’t think anybody had ever seen that much snow in the month of September in Yosemite national park.

with Mr. Muir Walking with Mr. Muir  by dwhike

"Keep close to Nature's heart... and break clear away, once in awhile, and climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean." -John Muir

pioneers: the Alpine pioneers: the "Tschingel Company", a legendary team  by Silvia Mazzani

Dogs’ vocation for mountaineering is out of discussion. In the past the St Bernard, the kingsize dog from the St Bernard Hospice, which saved travelers crossing the Alps between Italy and Switzerland, when scattered in the ancient snowy nights, was long regarded as the only mountain dog. Who could forget the invincible Barry, founder of all the St Bernards, victim of his generosity, who after saving forty wayfarers was killed by the forty-first one? Actually the more recent history tells us about other brave dogs summiting peaks, climbing, crossing glaciers alone, finding people buried under an avalanche! Anyhow, nowadays Tschingel (Berner Oberland, CH 1865 - Dorking, UK 1879) still remains the most famous tailed-mountaineer of all the times! Indeed the star of Tschingel will shine forever in the history of alpinism, in reason of her value and her challenging mountain climbs.

Anchors: A few thoughts Rappel Anchors: A few thoughts  by Brian C

Going up results in coming back down and naturally, rappelling is an ever important part of climbing. In addition, many people use rappels that are not involved in technical climbing with some examples being canyoneering, sport rappelling and challenging scrambles. Since rappelling puts your well-being entirely at the mercy of the technical system that you have established, if any point of the system fails you are likely going to be injured (or worse). Rappel accidents occur every year due a wide variety of mostly avoidable scenarios and even experienced climbers fall prey.

What is a Rock Glacier? What is a Rock Glacier?  by Alex Wood

What is a rock glacier? This term rock glacier is often thrown around loosely with little implication of the origin. This article is about rock glaciers, as you probably guessed. I wrote this as a report for one of my geology classes and have attempted to turn it into a readable article.

L'Affaire Freney L'Affaire Freney  by ericvola

August 29 1961: the ‘Last Great Problem of the Alps’, The Central Pillar of Frêney, is solved by Chris Bonington, Ian Clough, Jan Djuglosz and Don Whillans. But in French eyes the honours go also to René Desmaison, Pierre Julien, Yves Pollet-Villard and Ignacio Piussi. Desmaison seemed unable to accept the facts of the respective Pillar ascents and set about denigrating the British achievement while inflating his own – a fiction in which he was supported by the all-powerful Lucien Devies, the veritable godfather of post-war French mountaineering.

The Year of the Angels The Year of the Angels  by Bob Sihler

As I walked back to the car that day, beaten and sore, I knew that I would have to return and find the right way up. And I also knew I needed to climb the South Guardian Angel.

Glaciers Glaciers  by PellucidWombat

What is a Glacier? Say you’re climbing in the mountains in late fall and you come across a body of snow that has been there for the whole summer, if not for years. Is it a glacier? Maybe, maybe not. Even if it has metamorphosed into ice, it still may be a permanent snowfield. The critical feature that glaciers have is movement.

The World
War I in the Dolomites, may 1915 - may 2015 The World War I in the Dolomites, may 1915 - may 2015  by AlbertoRampini

While the WWI broke out in 1914, the fighting on the alpine chain and on the Dolomites began about a year later, on 1915, May 24th, just a century ago, after the Italian war's declaration against the Austro-Ungarian Empire. Between 1914, July and 1918, November, the First World War involved the greatest world powers and some of the minor ones. It was initially an European war between Austro-Hungarian Empire, Germany and Ottoman Empire coalition opposed to other European countries, as United Kingdom, France, Russia and Italy, but with the subsequent involvement of the United States of America and Japan it became a full-scale war, taking the name of "World War" or "Great War". The Italian-Austrian border ran for 370 kilometers along the line drawn in 1866, an almost entirely mountainous border. The mountains were a natural bulwark in which, next to the two warring parties, a common enemy soon made its appearance: the winter at high altitude. Fighting involved different alpine and subalpine groups, as Adamello, Ortles-Cevedale, Carnian Alps and Little Dolomites, but unexpectedly the Dolomite front was the place where the war in altitude reached the limite of sacrifice. "A war within the war", where it was first of all necessary to survive the extreme environmental conditions, then to fight.

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