Welcome to SP!  -
Viewing: 251-260 of 379 « PREV 1 ... 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 ...  38  NEXT » 
“I’ll
Take My Mountains Padded with Rubber!” Part I “I’ll Take My Mountains Padded with Rubber!” Part I  by silversummit

Some people view mountains by climbing gentle paths or steep, rocky trails; some from snow capped peaks and lofty summits. Some climb down through canyons and caves; squeezing through twisty slots even wading through pools of muddy water. And here on SP you can read about all the above and more. I too, devour many of the posted trip reports and browse the mountain pages looking for a good hike to take in the future but now, I think it’s the proper time to admit that I do like to give my legs a rest sometimes and “paddle right through the mountains”.

More
Centennial
Series: Glacier National Park’s Ptarmigan Tunnel Centennial Series: Glacier National Park’s Ptarmigan Tunnel  by FlatheadNative

At the top of the Ptarmigan Creek, above Ptarmigan Lake and below the Ptarmigan Wall lies the Ptarmigan Tunnel, the only tunnel in Glacier National Park.

To properly pronounce (at least at Glacier National Park), "ptarmigan" drop the "p" in the front of the word and say "tar-mi-gan."

This 240 foot tunnel through nearly vertical rock on the Ptarmigan Wall allows access from the Many Glacier Valley into the Belly River Country. Before 1930 access into the Belly River was gained over Red Gap Pass or Gable Pass from the eastern border near Chief Mountain as well as along the Belly River which flows southwest from the Chief Mountain Customs station on the U.S.-Canadian Border between Glacier National Park and Waterton International Peace Park. The Belly River country could also be reached via Stoney Indian Pass from Waterton Lake or even Browns Pass above Bowman Lake.

More
In Defense
of the Wild In Defense of the Wild  by magicdufflepud

In the last couple years, I've spent a good deal of time paging through Summitpost, consuming a lot of what it had to offer without ever really giving back. Now, as exams instill in me an even greater desire to procrastinate, I've finally found the motivation to produce something for this site. What follows is an abridged (really!) and more reader-friendly (but still kinda institutional and stuffy) version of an essay I wrote for an environmental ethics course. I've tried to keep it apolitical, yet I realize that this site isn't a platform for opinions. Hopefully you'll understand why I argue for the value of wilderness and why I believe it's appropriate for Summitpost.

More
Wilderness
Safety and the Simplest Ways to be Prepared Wilderness Safety and the Simplest Ways to be Prepared  by TrekAdam

I would hope that most everyone knows of the basic "rules" of safety when exploring the outdoors - gather knowledge about where you plan to be and be prepared! Pack a couple band-aids, throw in an antiseptic wipe, maybe bring some ibuprofen or acetaminophen for that unexpected muscle pain or headache. Find information about the weather, read up on local wildlife and plan ahead for that unforcastable mishap. Whether you're a rock climber, hiker, backpacker or serious mountaineer certain supplies will almost always become a necessity, especially in those critical situations. Even the less critical situtions, for instance, when you or your buddy get a small cut or lets say get stung by a bee (and you just so happen to be allergic to bee stings), require attention and can only be addressed if proper planning and preparations have been made... Regardless of your activity or the amount of time you typically spend in the wilderness, whether it be a day long hike or a week long backpacking trip, there are some supplies that are absolutely essential to ensuring your safety.

More
In praise
of the Dawn Patrol In praise of the Dawn Patrol  by mvs

At first, Dawn Patrols don't happen for the fun of it. An enthusiastic hiker or climber gets out every weekend he can, which is unfortunately not every weekend of the month. Sober calculation reveals that the high summer offers something like 10 to 15 available trips. Weather, weddings and other kinds of attrition may bring the number down to 8 or 9.

More
Homecoming Homecoming  by Athos791

I’m not one who usually just sits down and writes down what’s on their mind. In fact I’m usually just the opposite, I store it all deep in my brain, and pull it out when needed. But reading of these recent tragedies in the mountains, and getting nervous about my upcoming expedition has got my thinking. Why? That is the question that every mountaineer is asked every time they talk to someone that is not into climbing. Why? Well I’ll tell you why! Oh wait… why do I do this? How can I not know why I truly climb? Is it just a bunch of little reasons that make up one big reason to climb? I don’t know, but what I do know is the thrill I feel as I am embarking on a trip. Driving into the mountains is almost like a homecoming, as if I were meant to be here my entire life, and to never leave.

More
Foehn effect Foehn effect  by visentin

Foehn, or Föhn in German, refer to a warm southerly wind coming over the Alps. However, the word is nowadays used to describe similar meteorological effects on all mountains all over the world.

For the anecdote, some time ago, the AEG german brand used "Fön" as a name for their electrical hairdriers. Subsequently that brand name has replaced the generic word and is now used in german for all electrical hairdriers.

Coming back to to topic, many mountaineers often use the expression "effect of Foehn" without really knowing its meaning. Let's try to understand how this phenomenon is working.

More
Centennial
Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part II Centennial Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part II  by FlatheadNative

Visit Glacier National Park just once and it will be easy to understand what drew man to this area for many centuries. Glacier National Park emanates wonder, it smells of natural history, it oozes geology and its beauty is like a Siren calling us to come closer and see more.

This place called Glacier has held many of us in its grasp and the allure of her peaks. Her passes and valleys have beckoned and call us back time and time again. It seems that we just can’t get enough of this place that is called “The Crown of The Continent”. I call it a “Glimpse of Heaven on Earth”.

More
Centennial
Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part I Centennial Series: A History of Glacier National Park’s Passes: Part I  by FlatheadNative

The history of Glacier National Park is replete with the traces of Native American life from before the turn of the 20th century. Native Americans have occupied or used Glacier National Park since well before the 19th century. Oral histories date back past written history which mentions the Blackfeet as early as 1789.

More
Home Is Where the Heartache
Is Home Is Where the Heartache Is  by Bob Sihler

It is dawn in Yellowstone, again. I love dawn here. It is not just because the traffic, especially the RV and bus traffic, has not arrived yet. It is not just because of the glow the early sunlight casts on the trees, meadows, hills, and mountains; or because of the mist that rises from the streams and turns a blinding white as the sunbeams strike it. It is because the world has begun again, the primordial world, a few remaining slivers of which Greater Yellowstone, along with just a handful of other places in the world, preserves in hoped-for perpetuity.

More
Viewing: 251-260 of 379 « PREV 1 ... 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 ...  38  NEXT »