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Panoramas? Here is how to do
it! Panoramas? Here is how to do it!  by Lukas Kunze

Why creating panoramas? I think they show scenery much better than single shots. Additionally panoramas can be used to create very high resolution images from every object with normal resolution cameras.

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Hiking and Climbing with
Children Hiking and Climbing with Children  by Scott

Perhaps you have heard such a phrase as “your climbing life is over when you have children”. Rest assured that is not the case. Most children love the outdoors and many are intrigued by exploration and challenging physical activity. This article will discuss several issues and have several tips pertaining to hiking and climbing with children. All are from my own personal experience and since every child and parent is different, your experience may be far different. Hiking and climbing with children can be a wonderful and exciting experience. It can also be frustrating at times, but is highly recommended.

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Human Factors in Avalanche
Incidents Human Factors in Avalanche Incidents  by Steve Larson

On March 1, 2003 eight experienced backcountry skiers set out to ride Microdot Peak in Alaska's Chugach range [4]. With four feet of new snow and bluebird skies, conditions were ripe for some awesome turns. They were also ripe for big slides. Three days before, the avalanche forecast for the area was “Considerable to High”, meaning that avalanches, both natural and human-triggered, were likely. A pit dug by the group near the base of the run revealed an instability, yet the group proceeded. After 4 skiers successfully descended the slope the fifth skier triggered a large slab avalanche and was carried 700 feet. Two skiers watching from the bottom were knocked down by the powder blast. Fortunately, the skier caught in the slide survived, and the two knocked down were unhurt. It could have turned out different.

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Disequilibrium of glaciers with current climate Disequilibrium of glaciers with current climate  by mauri pelto

n historic times, glaciers grew during the Little Ice Age, a cool period from about 1550 to 1850. Subsequently, until about 1940, glaciers around the world retreated as climate warmed. Glacier recession declined and reversed, in many cases, from 1950 to 1980 as a slight global cooling occurred. Since 1980, glacier retreat has become increasingly rapid and ubiquitous, so much so that it has threatened the existence of many of the glaciers of the world. This process has increased markedly since 1995, leading to such bizarre steps as covering sections of Austrian alpine glaciers with plastic to retard melting.

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Finding
Freda Du Faur Finding Freda Du Faur  by dadndave

In a brief and remarkable career spanning the southern summers of 1909/10 through to 1912/13, Emmaline Freda Du Faur assembled a truly remarkable climbing resume. Starting as a raw novice to mountaineering in December 1909, and armed only with her self-taught rocklimbing skills, Freda commenced her alpine career under the guidance of famous pioneer Mt Cook guide, Peter Graham. In order to assess Freda’s ability, Graham took her out on a 10 hour traverse of Mt Wakefield and Mt Kinsey at the extreme southern end of the Mt Cook range. This climb convinced Graham that his client was able to tackle bigger things without further assessment. Remarkably, and well ahead of his Edwardian time in this respect, Graham had said that he saw no reason why Freda should not be a mountaineer, despite the fact that she was almost certainly the first woman in his experience to express such a desire.

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100 Years on the Timpanogos
Glacier 100 Years on the Timpanogos Glacier  by Scott

The "glacier" is somewhat of an unusual and interesting feature for Utah. A perhaps little known fact is that the glacier used to have some rather large (by Rockies standards) and visible crevasses before the Dust Bowl Route of the 1930's. Some of the old photos are available at BYU, and one is posted in the section below. After the 1930's drought, much of the glacier melted and has never recovered. After the Dust Bowl Drought the glacier was thought to be more of a perpetual snowfield over a rock glacier until the surface snow completely melted for the first time in the drought of 1994. During that year a large crevasse opened up in the talus, revealing glacial ice below. For now the glacier survives and is protected under the talus. The surface snow and ice also completely melted in 2003.

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Wilderness is for Everyone Wilderness is for Everyone  by Scott

Perhaps you have heard some of the myths and lies. Lets examine them closely.

  • Wilderness advocates want to lock everyone off the land
  • Wilderness Advocates Want to Lock Away Most of the Land
  • Wilderness Advocates are Affluent, and Want the Land For the Affluent

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  • In memory of Angelo
D'Arrigo In memory of Angelo D'Arrigo  by luciano

    It’s a hard day for all the people in the world who love adventure and the freedom that only mountains can do. We are here to remember a great man who make the story of the flying and for it he’s tragically died on a sunny sunday of spring. Sunday 26, Angelo d'Arrigo crashed with an airplane and his spirit fly away from us. He has flown all over the world. He has flown across seas, deserts, volcanoes, glaciers and mountain chains in some of the remotest parts of the planet, flying with eagles and all kinds of birds of prey.

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    Terragen for visualization Terragen for visualization  by mvs

    There is a great set of resources out there for building a virtual flyover of a real-life terrain you are interested in (see a sample picture of McMillan Cirque on the right). Combining free elevation data (DEM files) from the USGS with Terragen can create amazing and functional images. It is the next best thing to being able to fly over the terrain in a small plane. I'll outline the procedure I followed to make the 5 minute film "Virtual Flight: The Picket Range." There is a great set of resources out there for building a virtual flyover of a real-life terrain you are interested in (see a sample picture of McMillan Cirque on the right). Combining free elevation data (DEM files) from the USGS with Terragen can create amazing and functional images. It is the next best thing to being able to fly over the terrain in a small plane. I'll outline the procedure I followed to make the 5 minute film "Virtual Flight: The Picket Range." Click here to see it.

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    Thank you Pioneers of my
Past Thank you Pioneers of my Past  by Isaiah

    People have been climbing to the top of stuff for a long time but its really the last 150 years where we have begun to really push the limits of what is possible. When I have gone out climbing I see all the gear and knowledge that most people have and the few unknowledgable stragglers out there that have no idea what they are doing on top of a mountian in a rainstorm wearing jeans. I want to express some advances and in my mind important achievements that we have over come to make this sport of getting to the top of stuff as safe and comfortable as it is.

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