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ben jamminUntitled Comment

ben jammin

Hasn't voted

Mount Kenya's first ascent was done by two Brits: Eric Shipton and Percy Wyn Harris on January 3, 1929



I don't believe that this is correct.



The first ascent of Mount Kenya's highest summit, Batian (5199m), was by Halford MacKinder, C. Ollier, and J. Brocherel in 1899.



Shipton and Wyn Harris made the second ascent of Mount Kenya to Batian. They did, however, in the process make the first ascent of Nelion (the lower of the twin summits at 5188m) by what is now the Normal Route on the SW face.



The Mount Kenya page now includes a summary of the mountain's climbing history.



Posted Feb 19, 2004 12:19 pm

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

That is interesting. It seems like still another opinion... do you have a source to document?
Posted Dec 3, 2004 3:19 pm

NelsonUntitled Comment

Nelson

Voted 10/10

In my pre-trip reading I am currently into Kilimanjaro by John Reader. (Elm Tree Books, 1982). He devotes pages 22-26 to this subject. I will give a very brief synopsis:



1884 - Harry Johnston, a 26-year old British explorer makes an agreement with Chagga chief Mandara to acquire absolute rights to 15 square km of forest near Taveta, north of the mountain.



1885 - Dr. Carl Juhkle, a member of the GDK, a German colonization society concludes 10 treaties with the Sultan of Zanzibar placing the territory around Kilimanjaro under German "protection".



1886 - In the complex web of 19th century geo-politics Britain, Germany, and France step towards war over this, but a treaty is reached. Each power is granted the rights to a port: Mombassa to the Brits, Dar es Salaam to the Germans, with the French consolidating positions in Madagascar. The Sultan kept control of Zanzibar and not much else. When negotiators worked out the border between Kenya and Tanzania, the 1884 and '85 Johnston and Juhkle agreements were held to be binding. Thus Taveta is in Kenya today, and the border near Kilimanjaro has a kink.



Reader concludes with:

There is a story that the boundary is kinked because Queen Victoria gave Kilimanjaro to her grandson (the future Wilhelm II) as a birthday present when the Kaiser complained that she had two snowy mountains ... while he had none. The gift, the story goes, caused some realignment of the boundary. This hoary old legend, which must have come from some humorist's pen, is often presented as solemn, unquestioned fact; but there is no truth in it.



John Reader is a writer and photojournalist who has spent decades living and working in Africa. I'd consider his an authoritative voice on the matter.
Posted Dec 7, 2004 12:53 am

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Good insight Nelson...thanks! I am going back to Kili in February to try a different route this time ( Machame) with my son in law and another friend. Here's wishing you success in your climb and hoping we all make it... or at least don't get too much altitude sickness!
Posted Dec 7, 2004 9:03 pm

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Good info. I agree with you only one guide is required. Many people like to do the minimum, annd that would be it. However, I think the majority of people would prefer to go with the extra expense and get the porters. All a matter of preference and budget. Thanks!
Posted Dec 22, 2004 3:11 pm

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Yes, I could not agree with you more. It seems the Western press tells of Westerners who where killed, but never mention the tragedies with the local guides and porters. As a result I don't know what really happened to any porters or guides. It seems that their fate is often hushed up because it doesn't rate ink in the West or because the local tour companies want to play down any tragedies. Regardless, I have expressed my sympathies to porters and asked that Westerners take care of them when climbing on a thread on the bulletin boards under Africa. They do indeed risk their lives for modest compensation by Western standards and they deserve all the respect possible. I certainly express condolences for any porters or guides who may have been killed or injured and I express my deepest sympathies to their families.
Posted Feb 10, 2006 9:16 pm

JohnUntitled Comment

John

Hasn't voted

>Why was the border to Tanzania moved to include

>Kilimanjaro?

>

>Basically the border as it is today was moved about

>200 miles or so NE at the instance of none other that

>Queen Victoria herself, after being petitioned by her

>nephew Kiser Willham, so the mountain would fall

>into German East Africa (Tanzania) instead of British

>East Africa (Kenya). The logic behind this was "The

>British Empire already had the greatest falls and

>second highest peak so it was only fair that German

>Empire got the highest peak."



According to Lonely Planet: Trekking in East Africa (2nd ed., page 116), this story is a myth and there's no evidence to support this ... or is there?



It is worth noting that much of the early climbing activity around Kili was done by Germans. The first ascent of Kilimanjaro was done by Hans Meyer and Ludwig Purtscheller on October 5,1889. They planted a German flag on the summit and named the tallest point Kaiser Wilhelm Spitze (now known as Uhuru Peak). On June 29, 1912 the first ascent of Mawenzi was done by another pair of German climbers: Fritz Klute and Edward Oehler. The highest peak on Mawenzi is still known as Hans Meyer Peak. Mount Kenya's first ascent was done by two Brits: Eric Shipton and Percy Wyn Harris on January 3, 1929. Read more about this in "Chapter 1: History" of Kilimanjaro & Mount Kenya : A Climbing and Trekking Guide by Cameron M. Burns.
Posted Jan 26, 2002 12:04 am

ben jamminUntitled Comment

ben jammin

Hasn't voted

Mount Kenya's first ascent was done by two Brits: Eric Shipton and Percy Wyn Harris on January 3, 1929



I don't believe that this is correct.



The first ascent of Mount Kenya's highest summit, Batian (5199m), was by Halford MacKinder, C. Ollier, and J. Brocherel in 1899.



Shipton and Wyn Harris made the second ascent of Mount Kenya to Batian. They did, however, in the process make the first ascent of Nelion (the lower of the twin summits at 5188m) by what is now the Normal Route on the SW face.



The Mount Kenya page now includes a summary of the mountain's climbing history.



Posted Feb 19, 2004 12:19 pm

HeyItsBenUntitled Comment

HeyItsBen

Hasn't voted

The real reason that the kink in the Tanzania/Kenya border exists is because of Mombassa and a deal struck between Germany and Britain, not Kilimanjaro.

The kink in the border was placed so that Mombassa would fall into British territory. The British needed Mombassa as a port, and the Germans already had Dar.
Posted Dec 3, 2004 1:29 am

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

That is interesting. It seems like still another opinion... do you have a source to document?
Posted Dec 3, 2004 3:19 pm

NelsonUntitled Comment

Nelson

Voted 10/10

In my pre-trip reading I am currently into Kilimanjaro by John Reader. (Elm Tree Books, 1982). He devotes pages 22-26 to this subject. I will give a very brief synopsis:



1884 - Harry Johnston, a 26-year old British explorer makes an agreement with Chagga chief Mandara to acquire absolute rights to 15 square km of forest near Taveta, north of the mountain.



1885 - Dr. Carl Juhkle, a member of the GDK, a German colonization society concludes 10 treaties with the Sultan of Zanzibar placing the territory around Kilimanjaro under German "protection".



1886 - In the complex web of 19th century geo-politics Britain, Germany, and France step towards war over this, but a treaty is reached. Each power is granted the rights to a port: Mombassa to the Brits, Dar es Salaam to the Germans, with the French consolidating positions in Madagascar. The Sultan kept control of Zanzibar and not much else. When negotiators worked out the border between Kenya and Tanzania, the 1884 and '85 Johnston and Juhkle agreements were held to be binding. Thus Taveta is in Kenya today, and the border near Kilimanjaro has a kink.



Reader concludes with:

There is a story that the boundary is kinked because Queen Victoria gave Kilimanjaro to her grandson (the future Wilhelm II) as a birthday present when the Kaiser complained that she had two snowy mountains ... while he had none. The gift, the story goes, caused some realignment of the boundary. This hoary old legend, which must have come from some humorist's pen, is often presented as solemn, unquestioned fact; but there is no truth in it.



John Reader is a writer and photojournalist who has spent decades living and working in Africa. I'd consider his an authoritative voice on the matter.
Posted Dec 7, 2004 12:53 am

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Good insight Nelson...thanks! I am going back to Kili in February to try a different route this time ( Machame) with my son in law and another friend. Here's wishing you success in your climb and hoping we all make it... or at least don't get too much altitude sickness!
Posted Dec 7, 2004 9:03 pm

CoraxUntitled Comment

Corax

Hasn't voted

Basically all agents in Moshi, Arusha and in particular overseas tries to convince you that there are no ways around having a guides (sometimes even assistent guides), porters and cooks and that all this is governmental rules.

This is not true!

The only requirement which is supported by the government of Tanzania is one guide!

There are some agencies that are straight shooters and inform you about this.

The best we found is Eagle Adventure in Moshi.

Contact info:

Abby M. Sawaya.

P.O. Box 449

Marangu, Kilimanjaro

Office in Moshi:

THB Bldg

Room # 204 2'nd floor.

Boma Rd. (Opp. clock tower, Moshi Town).

E-mail: kilimanjaro_sawaya_eagle@yahoo.com



The process of arranging the deal was very straight to the point. Mr. Sawaya told us excactly what the fees for the park were and what his commission was.

The tip for the guide was included in the price and was clearly stated in the contract.

The total sum for three persons for four days was $1080, which brought the total cost down to $360/person, which I found pretty good.

He asked us what type of a guide we wanted and when we told him we wanted a strong and fast person to accompany us, he recommended a man called Hamadin. It was the right choice.

Hamadin had to put up with a break-neck speed and an unorthodox approach. We started from Kibo Hut at 06:15 in the morning and pushed on quickly to the summit which was reached in less than three hours. Most guides we saw on the summit day was not up to this type of approach.

Highly recommended!



Da Costa Hotel is conveniently located some hundred meters from Eagle Adventures' office, where clean basic doubles goes for $6. A good restaurant upstairs.

The hotel next door, Kidoroko is more expensive ($15) and a good choice if you want a little bit more luxury, a funky restaurant and internet services etc.
Posted Dec 18, 2004 10:26 am

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Good info. I agree with you only one guide is required. Many people like to do the minimum, annd that would be it. However, I think the majority of people would prefer to go with the extra expense and get the porters. All a matter of preference and budget. Thanks!
Posted Dec 22, 2004 3:11 pm

DigglerUntitled Comment

Diggler

Hasn't voted

It would be appropriate to acknowledge the deaths/injuries (seems like the accounts vary) of the porters involved here as well. They do the greatest amount of work on the mountain, & consistently exert themselves & risk their safety in this comparatively (as far as E African wages go) well-paid yet dangerous livelihood.
Posted Feb 9, 2006 5:32 pm

kilimanjaro1Untitled Comment

kilimanjaro1

Hasn't voted

Yes, I could not agree with you more. It seems the Western press tells of Westerners who where killed, but never mention the tragedies with the local guides and porters. As a result I don't know what really happened to any porters or guides. It seems that their fate is often hushed up because it doesn't rate ink in the West or because the local tour companies want to play down any tragedies. Regardless, I have expressed my sympathies to porters and asked that Westerners take care of them when climbing on a thread on the bulletin boards under Africa. They do indeed risk their lives for modest compensation by Western standards and they deserve all the respect possible. I certainly express condolences for any porters or guides who may have been killed or injured and I express my deepest sympathies to their families.
Posted Feb 10, 2006 9:16 pm

rlawsonAvoid the middleman to save a few bucks

rlawson

Hasn't voted

We booked our trip through 7summits.com, which we found by following the link on theSummitPost Kilimanjaro page (http://www.kilimanjaro-trips.com/). The service was excellent all around, and we have no complaints. But it turns out that 7summits.com is simply a booking agent for Zara Tanzanian Adventures, the largest such company in the area. If you want to save yourself the middleman fee (about $200 per person), I suggest going directly to Zara here: http://www.zaratravel.com/.
Posted Mar 13, 2007 5:05 pm

hans.schenkA little history...

hans.schenk

Voted 10/10

Thanks for your page! I agree a bit of history is in order. Here is just a little of what I understand of the original sighting...

Johann Ludwig Krapf was a member of the Church Missionary Society (Anglican Church) who established a mission station at Rabai in 1846 along with Johannes Rebmann. They decided to explore the interior to locate more tribes that might be receptive to the Gospel. Frequently, they would split up in order to be more efficient in their explorations, and it was Johannes Rebmann who first sighted Kilimanjaro on 11 May 1848. Rebmann's report of Mount Kilimanjaro was published in the Church Missionary Intelligencer and was quickly looked upon with scorn by a geographer named W.D. Cooley. W.D. Cooley and other geographers didn't think that snow could exist on a mountain on the equator, so they thought that Rebmann had hallucinated or misintepreted what he saw. In 1862 Baron Karl Von Der Decken and R. Thornton were on their second attempt of the mountain when it snowed during the night, thus ending the debate.

Sources:

Bengt Sundkler and Christopher Steed, A History of the Church in Africa (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000), 517.

Stock, Eugene. The History of the Church Missionary Society: Its Environment, Its Men, and Its Work, 3 vols. London: CMS, 1899.

Pirouet, M. Louise. “The Legacy of Johann Ludwig Krapf.” International Bulletin of Missionary Research 23 no 2 (April 1999): 69-74.

Burns, Cameron M. Kilimanjaro and East Africa: A Climbing and Trekking Guide. (Seattle: The Mountaineers Books, 1998), 240pp.
Posted Jun 17, 2008 10:59 am

kingofbanffFirst Snowboard Descent was in 1988

Hasn't voted

In 1988, Barry Lewis and I hiked Kilimanjaro and I snowboarded down the snowcap. There are a bunch of pics in the link and if you skip to the end of the pics you will see the articles in various ski/board magazines.

http://picasaweb.google.com/jericocoloco/KilimanjaroFirstDescent1988#

Ace
Posted Aug 27, 2010 7:51 pm

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