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Mount Avalon
Mountain/Rock

Mount Avalon

 
Mount Avalon

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: New Hampshire, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 44.20600°N / 71.429°W

Object Title: Mount Avalon

Elevation: 3430 ft / 1045 m

 

Page By: EastKing

Created/Edited: Jan 11, 2004 / Dec 11, 2012

Object ID: 152226

Hits: 18620 

Page Score: 80.48%  - 12 Votes 

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The Presidentials from Mt. Avalon

Beautiful Shot of the the...
Beautiful Shot of Mount Washington

Overview

Looking into Crawford Notch...
Looking at Crawford Notch


Mount Avalon clearly contains one of the best view of the Presidential of all the mountains at Crawford Notch. This is a smaller peak that one achieves as they attempt to climb Mount Field and Mount Willey. As a matter of fact, it is difficult to determine the actual peak until you come across the cairns marking the summit. Views from the are excellent north toward the Presidentials and east towards Crawford Notch.

Summit Scramble
Summit Scramble


Mount Avalon is located in Grafton County in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. The actual hike to Mount Avalon is fairly straight forward with well maintained and marked trails. The trail starts off on a relatively small incline but eventually turns into a rather steep climb to the "summit" of Mount Avalon.

Scramble Section
Looking at the scramble

Getting There

Beginning at the town of North Conway, New Hampshire, take Route 302 norhtwest to the Crawford Depot which will be on the left side of the road and also being at the highest point that Route 302 reaches in this area. There is adequate parking here. The actual depot is a train station.

Once you've parked your vehicle, cross over the railroad tracks and look for the sign marking the trailhead. Head into the forest along the well worn trail and follow the signs towards the summit. As soon as you enter into the forest, you will see a large sign at a split in the trail. This sign has a map all of the trails in the area. Bear to the right at the split in the trail and follow the Avalon Trail, making several stream crossings, and then paralleling the stream. This portion of the trail is fairly flat as it follows the contours of the stream. At the next well marked trail juncture, make a left and follow this rather steep portion of the trail (continues as the Avalon Trail) to the summit of Mount Avalon. If you care to make it to the top of the ridge, you could continue on the Avalon Trail and summit Mount Field and Mount Willey.

Red Tape

On this trailhead there are no fees due to the fact that the AMC Crawford Notch Lodge is located right there.

When To Climb

This small mountain could be climbed year round. Conditions could be pretty severe in the White Mountains. Make sure to dress appropriately and don't underestimate the conditions. Also, the day I climbed Mount Avalon, the steep portion of the trail was covered in ice. This area gets little sunlight. Don't let the flatter portion of the trail fool you for what may come. In winter crampons are nessesary. Though Class 1, the last half mile of the trail steep and is hard to do on snowshoes.

The AMC White Mountain Guide is an asset when climbing in this area. I've found the maps and information to be very helpful.
In additon, you may want to purchase the USGS quad sheet for this area: Crawford Notch

Camping

There is a campsite several miles south of the Crawford Depot called Dry River Campground. There are (31) primitive campsites available for $13 per night. Here is a link to the campground.

Dry River Campground

Mountain Conditions

The Mount Washington Webcam can give you an idea of current conditions in the White Mountains

Here are two websites that will provided you the best information on conditions on Mount Avalon.


Appalachian Mountain Club

Current Trail Conditions


Weather Forecasts

Here is a link to Weather at Crawford Notch. Take into account the elevation increase for weather on the summit.

Weather in Crawford Notch

Summit Picture Log

Post all hero pictures here.

Special Thanks

Special thanks to iceaxeman for his original submission of this page.

External Links

Images