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Mount Hood
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Mount Hood

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Mount Hood

Page Type: Trip Report

Location: Oregon, United States, North America

Object Title: Mount Hood

Date Climbed/Hiked: May 20, 2014

Activities: Hiking

Season: Spring

 

Page By: Diesel

Created/Edited: Jun 13, 2014 / Jun 18, 2014

Object ID: 900478

Hits: 2735 

Page Score: 81.6%  - 15 Votes 

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Mount Hood

The day of the Mount Hood hike could not have been any better: clear sky and cold. I started my hike (solo) at 5:50 AM. (I really wanted to start at daybreak, but I only hit the sack at 1 AM, so I wanted my sleep). Temp was in the low 30s which kept the snow all good and frozen. I hiked on a Tuesday when not many people were on the mountain. I made the mistake of having breakfast before I left; for the first hour of the hike, my body’s entire energy was directed towards digesting food.  Therefore, my breathing was heavy and I felt a lot of discomfort. After that, things got better. I had micro spikes -3/8” (not real crampons) on my boots. That really helped with my hike on the frozen snow.

Mout Hood
Mout Hood

 

At about 6:30 AM I could spot a group of 7 hikers all the way up on the final ascent, from the Hogsback toward the Old Chute. There were also two guys hiking very close to the ski lift, about .5 miles ahead of me. About 1:45 hours into my hike, the operators of the ski lift decided to start the lift. Darn! – I said. I could’ve waited and used the lift for the 2 miles. As I passed the top of the ski lift (I was hiking about 0.25 miles to the right of it), I also passed the two hikers who were hiking very close to the lift. I kept going up and the slope started to be more and more abrupt. At one point, it became quite difficult to hike with my small micro spikes. Lucky me, I came across and followed a nicely frozen track of foot steps. It looked like the foot steps were made the day before, when the temp was probably a little bit more above freezing. They were a bit sunk in but, fortunately for me, they were frozen and I used them as steps. I followed these foot steps until they were not visible anymore.

Mount Hood
Mount Hood

 

When I got to Crater Rock, one guy was coming down. I talked to him a bit. He was telling me how he and his friends attempted to hike two days before, but, there was such a blizzard (read my post on Mount St Helens from two days prior), that they got all confused and lost even before they reached the top of the ski lift. They made the smart decision to turn back. It took me 2:45 hours to get to Crater Rock. This hiker was really impressed with my time. He did not say how long he needed to get to Crater Rock, but I did not care. As far as I was concerned, I was not going fast enough, and it looked like I was going to slow down even more from there on. As I continued to the Hogsback, I could see the group of 7 hikers descending, all of them clearing the Chute at this point. I could also spot two hikers that were making their way to the right of the Bergschrund Crevasse toward the Pearly Gates. This year, that route looked very dangerous and I could tell, by the lack of tracks, that not many hikers were going up Pearly Gates, as of yet.

Pearly Gates
Pearly Gates

 

When I reached the Hogsback, three of the seven hikers were already there and resting. It did not take much to tell them that I was hiking for 3:10 hours so far. They told me that they left the Timberline Lodge at 12 midnight. It took them 7 hours to make it to the summit. I did not say anything, but that seemed like and awful long time. To be hiking for 7 hours, starting at midnight, and only be 2/3 done, it’s a strenuous thing. While I was sorry for them, the multi-point question came from them: do you have an ice pick? No. I realized at that point that I totally, entirely, irresponsibly forgot to bring one. Well, they said, that is bad. The Chute is all ice and it will be very dangerous to go up that way. One girl was even nice enough to almost give hers to me. However, because I was not from Oregon, she figured I was not honest enough to be trusted with mailing it back.

Old Chute hiking down
Old Chute hiking down

 

So, I continued toward the Old Chute having their best wishes. The hike from the Hogsback to the Old Chute was not bad. All these hikers going up and down in the past two days left a very nice hiking trail in the snow. Mid-way to the Old Chute I met the other 4 people in their group. One guy also asked me about my ice pick. I felt like an idiot. I had second thoughts. The rest of the hike looked so difficult, that actually I considered going to the Chute and decide there if I can keep going up or not. The guy said “I’d give you mine but I still need it to go down”. In actuality, from that point on, going down, nobody would’ve really needed an ice pick, but I couldn’t say anything. It wasn’t his fault I did not bring one. The funny part is that this guy also asked me if I was from Oregon. When I said no, he replied with “have a safe trip.” I think people from Oregon don’t particularly trust other people. I kept going up and, in about a couple of minutes, the guy yelled at me. I turned around and he offered me an ice pick. He had two and he figured that, from that point on, he really did not need two of them anymore. Well, my friend, the distance between us was about 50 yards by now. I wasn’t going to hike down and back up for gold, let alone for an ice pick. I said that’s ok, thank you. He replied with strong words: “it will save your life. If you slipped, there is no way you can stop until you hit the fumaroles down there.” He was right; if I slipped, I was a goner. The snow was so frozen and the incline so steep, I couldn’t stop until I hit the rocks down in the fumaroles. Nevertheless, I did not hike down to get the ice pick.

Old Chute
Old Chute

 

I continued on to the Chute. I got to the Chute and that’s when I realized that I had never seen a steeper ice wall that I had to climb without gear. Needless to say, I had never hiked on ice before in my life. But, I took it a step at the time (one can easily establish my novice idiocy here.) In many instances I had no grip, nothing to support myself except the micro spikes on my boots. It was scary. I had a few instances where I slipped a few inches and I really thought that was it. Easy and with a lot of attention, I made my way up. I remember every step I took on that Old Chute, but I hope everyone gets the picture, and I don’t have to engage the drama writer in me. Once I cleared the Chute, there was just an easy, maybe 100 yards walk, to the summit.

Summit of Mount Hood
Summit of Mount Hood

 

The day was beautiful, with sun and clear sky. All white, puffy clouds were below the summit, which made for a beautiful view. In the distance I could see Mt St Hellens, Mt Rainier and Mt Adams. The two guys, who were hiking via Pearly Gates that I mentioned before, were already there. They got there a few minutes before me. They said they left at 4 am. I looked at my watch and I realized that it took me 4:45 hours to the summit. I could not really enjoy my time on the summit. I took a few pictures of the panorama, I asked the guys to take a few pictures of me, I took a few pictures of them, and I was ready to hit the road. All I could think of was how was I going to hike down that horrendous Old Chute without an ice pick.

Clouds
Clouds

 

So, I figured it out (hunger is the best cook.) I did not have and ice pick with me but I had trekking polls in my backpack. I brought them up to use when hiking down. So I took them out, I did not extend them but rather kept them short. When I got to the Chute, I used them to stick them in the frozen snow as deep as I could. That did not provide me with much anchor, but, it provided just enough stability so I could keep my balance while moving slowly. I would not take a step down unless I had both polls jammed all the way to the hilt in the frozen snow. Anyway, I eventually cleared the Chute and from there, everything was just going downhill.

Bergschrund Crevasse
Bergschrund Crevasse

 

By this time of the day, the snow started to melt a little bit, so it made the footing more stable. I hiked down greeting hikers going up. Below Crater Rock I decided to slide down on my back since it was much easier to stop if need be. I caught up again with the 7 hikers that I encountered going up. Boy, these people were moving slow. I kept sliding down as much as I could toward the Loge, since there was no danger anymore. I wished I could slide all the way to the lodge, but the snow was melting a lot in the sun - so much so that it slowed me down to a total stop. I hit the parking lot after exactly 6 hours and 18 minutes from when I started, and 6.64 miles, round trip.

Hogsback
Hogsback

 

My recommendations, besides the right hiking clothing: do not start hiking before the brake of dawn. Have crampons and at least one ice pick. I used 5 bottles of water but, keep in mind, that it was a cold day. All the food I ate on the mountain was energy food. No whole food.

Mount Hood
Mount Hood

 

Images


Comments


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BaddogPlease Use Your Head

Hasn't voted

Congratulations on your successful summit! You don't strike me as someone who follows the advice of others, but please pay attention to what other more experienced climbers tell you. You called this a "hike", but Mt. Hood is a deceptively dangerous climb. Many Mt. Hood climbers are injured or killed by falling rock and ice. Did you even wear a helmet? Even years of experience and 50 or more summits of Hood can't keep climbers from dying on this mountain. Portland Mountain Rescue, Crag Rats, and several other search-and-rescue units are called to Mt. Hood each year to risk their lives searching for and bringing out morons like you who are unprepared and have no business being on the mountain.
Posted Jun 20, 2014 11:10 am

DieselRe

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Greetings Baddog,
I do not appreciate your tone in your comment to my post. I will remind you that this is not Facebook and I am not your friend so you can call me names. One can easily disagree without being out of line. However, the attitude you portray here says a lot of what a type of a person you are. You are condescending, trying to come off as Mr. Know-it-all, telling others how to go about living their life. You are nobody's keeper. Your nick name itself, trying to inspire "badness" says it all anyway.

In regard to your comments, they might be true in theory, but in practice they are not valid. It's hard to consider Mount Hood a "climb." Except the Old Chute where there are 30 yards of steep climb, made only difficult by ice, there is no technicality to this mountain. Helmet: no, I did not have one. Nor the other 15 hikers that were on the mountain that day. When you refer to the "unprepared" hikers I have again to admit that I don't know what you mean. I read a lot about Mount Hood and the accidents before the hike. It did not appear to me that people died or get into accidents due to lack of equipment. Most of them had the right equipment but they still slipped (as it was the 57 years old man who hiked a week after I did and ended up into the fumaroles) collapsed along with the cornices (as it was the priest from New Jersey who felt from the top a week before I hiked) or were not physically fit. Everybody was well equipt. Just not careful.

I very well knew how to handle myself and I was always aware of the dangers. The fact that I was always very much aware of what was going on it's the trip report itself.
Posted Jun 20, 2014 1:47 pm

BaddogRe: Re

Hasn't voted

Diesel: My initial response to your trip report was done almost in a state of shock after reading the report and my hasty choice of language may have started things off on the wrong foot. I apologize for that. I was reacting to someone blatantly disregarding well-meaning advice and offers of assistance from more experienced climbers in order to put his life on the line. If you had hurt yourself because you could not self-arrest on a steep slope or if you had wandered off in a whiteout and become lost in Zigzag Canyon, your actions would affect many more than just yourself. A search-and-rescue operation would involve many people you have never met and public agencies would be footing the bills.

As you noted, people have died on the mountain even though they were carrying the proper equipment. What you don't know is how many people are still alive because they were using a helmet, ice axe, or (real) crampons. I have personally seen lives saved by each of these (although since I have not posted any climbs on this website, I probably can't be trusted.) Mt. Hood, even by the easiest, south side route is a dangerous climb, regardless of your mistakenly labeling it as a "hike". You are correct in that the south side route is not particularly difficult, but that is only when things go well. Starting the climb in daylight and with limited equipment was stacking the odds against you.

To anyone considering climbing Mt. Hood by the standard south side, it should be clear from the responses to this trip report that climbing this mountain is not to be taken lightly. I recommend reading the post on this website describing the Mt. Hood's standard route. (Search for "south-side-hogsback/155408.") As the author states in that description, ice axe, crampons, and helmet are essential equipment. That's just the beginning: A map and compass should also be carried on this mountain as well as common sense and basic mountaineering skills like self-arrest and navigation.

Diesel, I hope you continue to post your "hikes". Having you thumb your nose to others offering to help you, denigrating serious climbers by pooh-poohing their climbs as "hikes", and refusing to use actual terms ("pick" or "peak" instead of "axe") is entertaining, although potentially misleading to novices. As long as readers take your reports with a grain of salt, we'll continue to have fun.




Posted Jun 24, 2014 2:26 pm

DieselRe: Re

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Baddog, wasn't it clear in my TR and my responses to everyone here that I really don't care of what you people have to say? Didn't I present my trip in a manner to be funny and relaxing? If I needed your help, I would've asked. But I didn't. I don't need your free consulting when it comes to safety. If you feel so good about yourself you should join OSHA, together with all these experts that took from their time to show here how great they are. All of you are so smart, so well prepared so amazing; I have no idea why nobody knows?!?!? I wonder when you have time to go hiking. Or maybe you are just couch hikers.

This is my story, the way I wanted to write it. I did not ask Summit Post to feature it. I wrote it for myself and my wife and did not expect anybody to read it. If you take offence with it, if you think is not appropriate for what this website stands for, just write the webmaster and they can ask me to re-write it or delete it. I find it so missed placed for all of you to tell me how to live my life. Make your life better for yourself and just pet yourself on the shoulder you are so incredible.
Posted Jun 24, 2014 4:46 pm

TrueScotsmanAstonished

Voted 1/10

This is a good example of what not to do.

You risked your life without the proper tools and equipment which endangered not only yourself but others, and even refused the assistance of others out of what appears to be convenience. An Ice Axe and Crampons are essential, and a helmet also strongly advised because of the falling rock danger.

It is also highly recommended that one start climbing much earlier in the day, before dawn, contrary to your recommendation.

I will not congratulate you on this summit as you had no business being up there. You left too late, lacked the necessary equipment and should have turned around upon recognizing your death was almost assured should you slip.

My words are harsh because what you did was irresponsible and reckless. I hope that you are able to learn from this experience and invest a little money and training into your safety and that of others.

Regards,
TrueScotsman
Posted Jun 20, 2014 12:00 pm

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Greetings TrueScotsman,
It is a bit funny the way you worded your statement: "you risked your life without the proper tools and equipment." In other words, it is ok to risk your like if you have the right equipment.

As I indicated to another person that was eager to provide me with the hate mail, I did my research seriously before hiking Mount Hood. People don't die on Mount Hood due to lack of equipment. They die of other factors as not being physically fit or not being careful. You pointed out crampons; I had crampon. Not the big blades, but still I had crampons that actually worked out perfectly. In truth, the folks that had the big crampons had difficulty on the Old Chute since the ice was so firm that the hikers could not cut into it anyway. As far as putting my life in danger; there is a danger in absolutely anything we do. One day I biked casually on the sidewalk and a lady driver decided to drive right into me. There are no actions we take that are free of danger. Nobody has "business" of being on the top of a mountain. It is a different kind of fun and a different kind of risk that certain people like to experience. In addition, I did not put anyone's life in danger as you accused wrongly.

As far as a starting time, you have your point of view and I have mine. In this particular case, I started at almost 6AM. I finished the hike before absolutely everybody that started the hike before me. What is the point of hiking in the dark? One cannot see any scenery, if there are dangers, they are hard to spot ahead of way, and one is tired from lack of rest. I assessed the risk every step of the way. It was never above my abilities. I lack experience hiking on ice but I made up being responsible of my moves and thinking about every move I had to take. I find your unkind tone gratuitous and unnecessary. Your big brother attitude resembles bullying.

So long,
Diesel
Posted Jun 20, 2014 2:52 pm

TrueScotsmanRe:

Voted 1/10

You said:

"Greetings TrueScotsman, It is a bit funny the way you worded your statement: "you risked your life without the proper tools and equipment." In other words, it is ok to risk your like if you have the right equipment."

It is about managing the inherent risks of the mountains by being prepared, you can't completely eliminate the risks. So your point is rather ridiculous.

You said:

"As I indicated to another person that was eager to provide me with the hate mail, I did my research seriously before hiking Mount Hood."

Hate mail? It's called stern correction, which is clear that you needed. I hardly doubt that you did sufficient research as is evidenced by the fact that you didn't have the necessary tools. Something you admitted to in your TR.

You said:

"People don't die on Mount Hood due to lack of equipment. They die of other factors as not being physically fit or not being careful."

Absolutely ignorant.. people die or get seriously injured by not having the proper equipment on any mountain, including Mount Hood. Not having an Ice Axe to self-arrest your fall on a steep slope that leads to a terrain hazard is absurd. Simply indefensible. Everyone makes mistakes eventually, which is why you bring those tools.

You said:

"You pointed out crampons; I had crampon. Not the big blades, but still I had crampons that actually worked out perfectly. In truth, the folks that had the big crampons had difficulty on the Old Chute since the ice was so firm that the hikers could not cut into it anyway."

Micro spikes are not crampons. lol

You said:

"As far as putting my life in danger; there is a danger in absolutely anything we do. One day I biked casually on the sidewalk and a lady driver decided to drive right into me. There are no actions we take that are free of danger."

That doesn't mean we go looking for it, while possibly putting other people in harms way. We MITIGATE the risk, by being PREPARED and experienced. When riding a bike we mitigate risk by being vigilant, obey the laws, and wearing a helmet. The same principles apply in climbing.

You said:

"Nobody has "business" of being on the top of a mountain. It is a different kind of fun and a different kind of risk that certain people like to experience. In addition, I did not put anyone's life in danger as you accused wrongly."

If you would have slipped, you would have had no way of stopping yourself, which means you could have taken out anyone below you. That applies for going up and going down. Also, you would have made other people responsible for hauling you out of the fumarole should you have fallen in. Just because you get lucky and don't end up hurting anyone doesn't mean you won't next time.

I enjoy climbing myself and go out and do it nearly every week, but I am extremely careful and do everything I can to mitigate risk.

You said:

"As far as a starting time, you have your point of view and I have mine. In this particular case, I started at almost 6AM. I finished the hike before absolutely everybody that started the hike before me. What is the point of hiking in the dark? One cannot see any scenery, if there are dangers, they are hard to spot ahead of way, and one is tired from lack of rest."

You've never heard of an Alpine start? Tell me, what does snow do as it gets sunnier on a clear day? It softens and melts. There are rocks that become dislodged and can hurt or kill you if struck and you mitigate that risk by starting extra early.

Oh.. but you did your research!

You said:

"I lack experience hiking on ice but I made up being responsible of my moves and thinking about every move I had to take. I find your unkind tone gratuitous and unnecessary. Your big brother attitude resembles bullying. So long, Diesel"

Your arrogance was clear from your post, and has been further demonstrated by your response. You admit that you lack experience, but then go on to defend every stupid thing you did. How does one learn if they don't accept correction?

I hope you don't die up there, and surely don't hope you end up hurting someone else.

Regards,
TrueScotsman
Posted Jun 21, 2014 8:30 am

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Hello TrueScotsman,
I will end the bickering contest here. Your your unnecessary offensive speech is not necessary. Also, your critical position to my hike is futile at this point. Maybe after you hike Mt Hood and post a trip report we can talk from the same level.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 10:25 am

TrueScotsmanRe:

Voted 1/10

It's not a hike. lol
Posted Jun 21, 2014 10:39 am

Fairley8Unbelievable

Fairley8

Voted 1/10

Your arrogance is truly astonishing. I'm glad you live in Ohio so you can't frequent volcanoes that you clearly don't respect. The second someone calls climbing Mt. Hood a "hike" indicates to me ignorance and lack of understanding. I didn't appreciate how you continued to make light of, even mock others who were trying to help you be safe. I also read your post about Mt. St. Helens and I'm surprised you are still alive after these two climbs. Climbing Mt. Hood requires respect and an education/experience that you don't seem to bother with. Your actions were selfish and reckless and there is a reason that others are trying to inform you of your poor decision making.

The reason people climb at night is because the snow is most firm and rock fall/ice fall danger is lower than when the sun is up. Saying that crampons with bigger teeth don't bite snow well when it's firm makes no sense. Mt. Hood is a technical climb because it requires technical gear such as crampons, axe, harness with partners, helmet.. South Sister in summer could be considered a hike. If you continue to climb in such a reckless fashion I'm afraid that you will pay the consequences or worse, someone else will.
Posted Jun 20, 2014 4:42 pm

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

It is disheartening and sad to see you are so hateful of someone disagreeing with you. I can read between the lines that you would be very happy if something bad would happen to me just to prove your point. That is despicable. If you don't like my trip report, just zoom by. I didn't intend for you to read it.

If you have a hard time hiking, don't take it on me. There are lot's of pictures online with folks who hiked Mount Hood in snickers, even regular walking shoes. There is also the famos story of a girl who hiked Mount Hood in high hills. Now, form that, to calling Mount Hood a difficult climb, it's a bit of a stretch. How would you call going up a 14ner in Colorado or Sierra Nevada? Let's be serious. Mount Hood is a mere 3 miles to the top. It took me 4:45 hours because I stopped and talked to everyone I meet going up. Let's not make it a big deal. Just because you are scared hiking such mountains it doesn't mean everybody is. On the Old Chute, with all the ice and concern I had, it took me 15 minutes to go up. It took me10 minutes to go down. I had no "technical gear" so that proves my point that people can go up an down in a casual fashion, just like the pictures show.
You take care of yourself and do not impose on others.
Posted Jun 20, 2014 10:22 pm

Fairley8Re:

Fairley8

Voted 1/10

You clearly don't care to listen to people trying to help educate you on what it means to climb safely. From reading your other responses on here, I'm disappointed to see that you are unwilling to listen to those with a respect and understanding of what it means to climb not "hike" Mt. Hood. Understand that I don't doubt that you are physically fit. However, just because you are in shape doesn't mean that Mt. Hood is not a technical climb.

What would I call a 14er in Colorado or the Sierra Nevadas? It depends on what mountain and the route you take. Give me an example of a specific Mountain and I'd be glad to help.

You straight up lied about your time spent on the Old Chute. It takes longer than 15min to climb the final 500ft to the top and more than 10min going down. Don't be ridiculous!

Out of the 10,000 that attempt Hood each year, the percentage of those attempting the mountain with tennis shoes or high heels is a tiny fraction compared to those who have the proper equipment.

Your arrogant attitude persists which is unfortunate because there are many here that are willing to help educate you if you would only listen.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 9:52 am

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

I have no intention of misleading people. The Chute was timed going up and down. I don't care what you make of my trip report and I don't care how you rate Hood. To me it was a medium to difficult hike at best. And that is only due to the block of ice on the Chute.

Listening to others? I would gladly but none of the critics have a trip report on Mt Hood. None. The only legit person here is Brian C. You have a few walks in the park and the others have nothing. Check it out for yourself. How is it fair to tell others how to do things that you didn't do?
So long.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 10:41 am

TrueScotsmanRe:

Voted 1/10

Some of us don't go tell the world when we climb, looking for glory...

TR's are useful, and this one is great for telling people what not to do.

Also, judging the comments based on their source is a genetic fallacy. An utter failure in logic.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 11:18 am

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

How convenient for you to hike and not tell. Comes very handy today. At least my report, as you incorrectly points out, gives a good account of my hike. That is all it is in the end: a trip report. You don't have to be all upset for I don't see Mt Hood a very difficult hike. That's my opinion and we don't have to agree. But we agree on me hiking it and you didn't.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 12:31 pm

TrueScotsmanRe:

Voted 1/10

Thousands of people climb it without telling. Remember I'm not the one bragging about my accomplishments.

It's not the difficulty of the hike, but the dangers that come with it and the technical tools highly suggested for those who climb this mountain. It is basically a walk up, but that only makes it more likely for people with less experience to try to reach the top. I've heard plenty of stories of guys falling on Mount Hood, and having to be extracted from the fumaroles.

I also went and read your Mt. St. Helens TR and that was a laugh too. You're simply asking for it. Could have fallen off a Cornice.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 4:13 pm

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Greetings SARdawg,
I do respect any valid and valuable advice, especially when I ask for it.
I feel the criticism was gratuitous since I did not see any part of the hike out of my limits. I din't have an ice peak. Too bad. I made it without. Was that bad? How many marathon runners finish the race with one shoe? How many skiers finish the race on one ski? Etc.

I have abandoned hikes due to weather conditions before. I think I know when it's too much risk and turning around it's the best option. I do not see summiting mountains as accomplishments. Millions of folks do it. I see it as great, unnecessary achievement. It's just fun to be outside.

I just din't realize when I signed up with Summit Post that there were so many patronizing people out there.

Yours,
Diesel
Posted Jun 20, 2014 10:33 pm

TrueScotsmanRe:

Voted 1/10

Wow.

How many marathon runners start with one shoe, or how many skiers start the race with one ski? How was your point logical?

There are hazards on sunny days too, such as ice/rock fall that gets more dangerous throughout the day.

I just find it astonishing that you would come up here and brag about what you did, and then not expect this response. If you want to learn how to be safer next time then there are plenty of people who would want to help, but you simply come across as some thrill seeking kid who is going to hurt someone.

I would have loved to have said, "good report," but your errors needed to be pointed out.

Regards,
TrueScotsman
Posted Jun 21, 2014 8:40 am

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

Did you just sign up Summit Post on 6/20 just to reply to my hike? You go ahead and enjoy your walks and call them climbs. I'm done here. It took me less time to hike the mountain than talking about the darn hike.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 10:51 am

DieselRe:

Diesel

Hasn't voted

You are entirety incorrect but you make stuff up just because you want to be right. The most dangerous mountain in the USA is Mt McKinley. In the lower 48 is Mt Washington in NH, mountain that I also hiked. I don't have a TR on it since I hiked it before I signed up with Summit Post.
The most dangerous volcano to climb in the US is Mt Rainier. Maybe your Mt Hood is the most dangerous in OR, but that's a small claim to fame.

Mt Hood looks more dangerous from afar than it actually is. I know because I hiked it. Along with hundreds of people in snickers, walking shoes or high hills.
Posted Jun 21, 2014 1:06 pm

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