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Northwest Face/North Ridge

 
Northwest Face/North Ridge

Page Type: Route

Location: Washington, United States, North America

Object Title: Northwest Face/North Ridge

Time Required: Half a day

Rock Difficulty: Class 4

Number of Pitches: 1

Route Quality: 
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Page By: kevinsa

Created/Edited: Jul 28, 2012 / Sep 5, 2012

Object ID: 802813

Hits: 665 

Page Score: 73.06%  - 3 Votes 

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Overview

Ok, it's time to stop the madness. Morning Star Peak is beginning to aquire an undeserved reputation amongst Snohomish County climbers as a wicked brush bash. Thankfully, there is a much easier approach to the mountain than the "East Route", which for some unknown reason has become the standard route to the summit. If you are not bothered by 50' of class 4 climbing, approaching Morning Star Peak via the Headlee Pass Trail will simplify your life greatly.

Note: The Cascade Alpine Guide refers to this route as "not the simplest way to the summit", an assessment that my climbing partner and I disagree with.

Getting There

Approach via the Sunrise Mine Road and Headlee Pass Trail, as per the East Route, except stay on the Headlee Pass Trail until at the switchbacks immediately below the pass.

Route Description

Turn left off of the Headlee Pass Trail at the base of the switchbacks below Headlee Pass. This point is unmistakable as there will be about 30 closely spaced switchbacks heading up a steep rocky slope.

View of Headlee Pass switchbacks from Morning Star Peak
 

Looking back at Headlee Pass switchbacks on the way to Morning Star Peak
 


Begin an east traverse on rocky slopes towards a point about 0.25 miles northwest of Morning Star's summit. From here, ascend straight up towards Morning Star's summit on steep rocky slopes (Class 3). A number of variations are possible here - one can stay in a gully, or exit onto brushy slopes to climber's right. At approximately 5600' (just below summit block), turn left, and traverse NW towards a notch in the ridge extending north from the summit. Unfortunately, I have no photo of this notch from the west, but upon arriving, you should have a view similar to the photo below.

View from ridge just below and north of Morning Star summit
 


Momentarily cross onto the east side of the ridge, and climb up and around to a slightly higher point on the ridge. Cross back over to the west side of the ridge. Here is where the class 4 climbing starts. (Note: It would be possible to climb up directly without crossing the notch in the ridge, but it would involve steep, loose, unprotected rock.)

In the photo below, the "x" marks the notch you will pass through (as viewed from the east).

Morning Star summit block from the east
 

Descending from Morning Star Peak via north ridge
 


The route consists of about 50' of relatively solid rock, and the climbing is fairly easy. As I recall, I used only two slings for protection on the route. It does appear in the photo that there are some cracks that would be suitable for chocks if one desired - at the time, I did not feel that they were necessary. Our total time to the top, once leaving the trail, was about one hour, which demonstrates how simple and quick this route can be.

View looking east from Morning Star Peak
 


There are plenty of small trees on the descent for an easy rappel back to the ridge notch.

Essential Gear

For this climb, we used two 9mm, 100' ropes, which were more than adequate for the climb and rappel. A single 150' rope would probably be adequate, but I honestly don't remember. We used only a couple of slings for protection, but it couldn't hurt to bring a few chocks if one wanted a little more protection (Size unknown - I will be sure to update this page after my next trip up Morning Star).

External Links

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Images

Descending from Morning Star Peak via north ridge