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Meals Ready to Eat (MREs)
Gear Review

Meals Ready to Eat (MREs)

 
Meals Ready to Eat (MREs)

Page Type: Gear Review

Object Title: Meals Ready to Eat (MREs)

Manufacturer: Warnick Company

Your Opinion: 
 - 4 Votes
 

 

Page By: plain zero

Created/Edited: Jun 21, 2007 / Jun 21, 2007

Object ID: 3446

Hits: 5576 

 


Product Description

Meals Reasy to Eat, or MREs, are military rations designed for soldiers who are away from organized food service facilities. They are a complete meal contained in a single package. A single meal provides about 1250 calories (per mreinfo.com).

Contents generally include an entree, a chemical heater, a main side dish (e.g. applesauce), a package of seasonings and accessories (salt, pepper, gum, matches, tobasco, etc), and usually some sides such as cheese and crackers and M&Ms.

MREs are widely available through military surplus stores, hunting and outdoor websites, and eBay. Because they are portable and require nothing more than water to prepare, MREs should be considered as a meal option for the hiker/climber/backpacker.

Features

The primary feature of the MRE that should be of interest to the outdoorsman is the chemical heater. The MRE meal is placed inside a pouch containing the heater, and once water is added the heater gets very hot and heats the meal usually within 5 minutes. No stove is required, and no flame is produced (no fire hazard).

MREs have become surprisingly palatable since my days in the Army in the late 90s. Gone are the terrifying Frankfurters Beef, soilent green-esque Ham Slice, and the alien Omelet with Ham. The current lots have 24 different entrees including Chicken and Dumplings, Spicy Penne Pasta, and Beef Ravioli. Chicken and Rice will be missed however, it's a shame to see that missing from the current menus.

Personal Experience

I've been eating MREs for 11 years, and when you are out there humping a pack for 15 miles, it's some pretty good chow. This is not for the backpacker gourmet who takes pride in preparing quality field chow, but should be considered by any backpacker who wants a hot meal that isn't dehydrated and doesn't want to hassle with a stove.

I usually pack 2 MREs per day for a full day (breakfast and dinner) and eat snacks for lunch, or just one MRE for an entry or exit day. The key is to open the MREs ahead of time and take only what you want. Most MREs are full of extra items that you will probably never eat, and there is a large amount of extra packaging that is fine when you are storing your MRE in the back of your HUMVEE, but not so good for a cramped backpack. Removing and tossing that excess reduces the weight and space requirements considerably.

Because MREs are not dehydrated they do weigh more than other meals, so they are probably not appropriate for very long trips. I've used them for as many as 4 days in a row, carrying six meals without much problem.

I'm giving MREs 5 stars, although this can depend on which entree you get. If you have never tried one, or had one a long time ago and thought it was terrible, try one of the new ones. They have gotten much more tasty, and you can't beat the convenience. If they are good enough for our boys and girls overseas, then they are are certainly good enough for me a few times per year.

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Reviews

Viewing: 1-5 of 5

gruntA good meal

Voted 5/5

I've eaten probably hundreds of MREs during my time in the Army (12 years), and I will agree that they have vastly improved. I find them to be quite tasty (even when eaten cold) and filling.

In the military, MREs have a bit of a reputation for causing constipation, but this should not be an issue for someone not eating them for days or weeks on end.

The cons: heavy, lots of packaging, messy garbage remains, and generally high sodium and fat content.
Posted Jun 23, 2007 3:51 am

tommiA good meal

Voted 4/5

I tried several MREs in the last years,
the heavy garbage and the weight of these packages are really not ideal, there are also things includet you dont need every time but the system of heating is very good, the meals taste better than i thought.
Posted Jul 17, 2007 4:21 am

mtybumpoYummy

Voted 5/5

I prefer MREs to freeze-dried. They are more filling and often taste better. There are also more varieties. The one disadvantage to MREs is the weight. They are on the heavy side. They also produce a lot of garbage.
Posted Aug 23, 2007 2:14 am

davebobk47Good

Hasn't voted

Most MREs are pretty good. The heater pack is nice and easy to use. I usually open them up and only take what I need since they can be a little heavy if you bring the whole thing.
Posted Aug 1, 2008 4:07 pm

Viewing: 1-5 of 5