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Postby norco17 » Tue Oct 27, 2009 5:20 am

suposedly the foam in these pads has "memory" and if they are stored unrolled they will supposedly reinflate quicker when you pull them out of your pack.

Day Hiker wrote:Also, when inflating, it is best to let the pad inflate on its own, without breathing into it (for self-inflating pads, where one has that option).


Mine is supposedly self inflating, but it never really has inflated all the way by itself. Maybe I am not patient enough?

DukeJH wrote:BTW, the patches work.

+1
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Postby Day Hiker » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:13 am

norco17 wrote:Mine is supposedly self inflating, but it never really has inflated all the way by itself. Maybe I am not patient enough?


I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it. Typically, I even have to let out a bit of air to make it comfortable for sleeping. (Princess, I suppose. :oops: )

If yours doesn't inflate, even after several minutes, I would guess it's because it's old, but you wrote that it never has worked right. So I don't know. The only experience I have is with the two I own.
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Postby The Chief » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:30 am

Day Hiker wrote:I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it.


Have you done this procedure at temps below 20 degs F above 11K'?

Your procedure requires certain temps and density alt to be at the right parameters in order for this to occur.

Plus, everyone knows that a Thermorest needs the assistance of Ridgerest in temps below 35 degs in order to insulate. Thermo's have little to no insulation properties and suck in the snow/cold.
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Postby Day Hiker » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:44 am

The Chief wrote:
Day Hiker wrote:I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it.


Have you done this procedure at temps below 20 degs F above 11K'?

Your procedure requires certain temps and density alt to be at the right parameters in order for this to occur.

Plus, everyone knows that a Thermorest needs the assistance of Ridgerest in temps below 35 degs in order to insulate. Thermo's have little to no insulation properties and suck in the snow/cold.


I used one at 18300 feet on Aconcagua. It was 0F at night and "not bad" during the day. It's been a couple of years, so I honestly don't remember if I had to give the pad any help there. I know for sure that it inflated at least mostly on its own.

I used a closed-cell pad underneath and for backup, by the way. I didn't want to blow my entire trip or try to patch a hole some cold dark evening if the inflatable decided to leak.
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Postby Baarb » Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:52 am

Re. self-inflating pads, I only recently bought a sleeping bad and after noting that it described itself as "self-inflating", the first time using it I left it to do its thing. No joy though so figured that the "self-inflating" bit must have meant that it's you that inflates it! Ah well, only takes a couple of mins anyway.
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Postby rhyang » Tue Oct 27, 2009 3:58 pm

everyone knows that a Thermorest needs the assistance of Ridgerest in temps below 35 degs in order to insulate. Thermo's have little to no insulation properties and suck in the snow/cold.


I use a 3/4-length Prolite 4 by itself for snow-camping in temps below freezing, generally in the 20's (F). Seems to work pretty well.

If I think it's going to be colder than say the low teens then I'll also bring one of those blue foam pads.

Darn, I thought this thread was going to devolve into a discussion of whether or not under the bed or behind the couch was better :twisted:
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Postby BrunoM » Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:04 pm

My two thermarests are rolled out/slightly inflated with the valves open behind a cupboard, so the cat can't get to it, it's not in the way and is protected from sunlight.
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Postby norco17 » Tue Oct 27, 2009 4:14 pm

The Chief wrote:
Day Hiker wrote:I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it.


Have you done this procedure at temps below 20 degs F above 11K'?

Your procedure requires certain temps and density alt to be at the right parameters in order for this to occur.

Plus, everyone knows that a Thermorest needs the assistance of Ridgerest in temps below 35 degs in order to insulate. Thermo's have little to no insulation properties and suck in the snow/cold.



Doesn't have to be that high or that cold and the thermarest will not self inflate. At 70 degrees at 2k it will but it takes awhile.

How tight do you guys roll it when you put it in your pack.
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Postby bird » Tue Oct 27, 2009 6:17 pm

I store mine safely with my thumb-tacks of the world collection.
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Postby woodsxc » Tue Oct 27, 2009 7:21 pm

Day Hiker wrote:
norco17 wrote:Mine is supposedly self inflating, but it never really has inflated all the way by itself. Maybe I am not patient enough?


I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it. Typically, I even have to let out a bit of air to make it comfortable for sleeping. (Princess, I suppose. :oops: )

If yours doesn't inflate, even after several minutes, I would guess it's because it's old, but you wrote that it never has worked right. So I don't know. The only experience I have is with the two I own.


The only pad I actually own is a ridgerest, but my family owns five thermarests. We store 'em unrolled, valves open at the back of the gear closet.

Physics says that the pad will inflate itself until it reaches the same pressure as the surrounding air. You'll need to give it a few puffs to firm it up. However, if you just unroll it in your tent and then leave it alone while you cook dinner (or stalk, ambush, butcher, and devour it raw if that's how you roll) and get the rest of your camp set up, it'll be as inflated as it's gonna get.
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Postby mconnell » Tue Oct 27, 2009 10:11 pm

The Chief wrote:
Day Hiker wrote:I have two different ones, and they both inflate without help. It takes at least a few minutes without anything resting on top of the pad, but that's about it.


Have you done this procedure at temps below 20 degs F above 11K'?

Your procedure requires certain temps and density alt to be at the right parameters in order for this to occur.

Plus, everyone knows that a Thermorest needs the assistance of Ridgerest in temps below 35 degs in order to insulate. Thermo's have little to no insulation properties and suck in the snow/cold.


Yup. Up to over 19,000' and temps down to about -25F. I always let mine self-inflate, but I also start it as soon as the tent is set up so it has a lot of time before I'm in it. I also spread out by sleeping bag at the same time to let it regain loft. I have also used my TR alone on snow down to about 20F, but agree with chief that a ridgerest makes it more comfortable. I wouldn't say that it has no insulating properties, just no enough. (It doesn't help that I use a 3/4 length TR, but does help that it is one of the old LE models that's 1.5" thick.)
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