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Postby Hotoven » Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:12 pm

norco17 wrote:
ExcitibleBoy wrote:
Hotoven wrote:I did Rainier late last summer, and It didn't get below frezzing, so I wouldn't worry about a parka.


One of my friends did raineer two years ago. He said he got temps below-5F. You want a parka!


I guess every one is different. I haven't owned a parka until now, and I haven't used it yet. I was in -30F (with wind chill) 2 weeks ago in the White Mountains, and I was cold, but not shivering. I was not stupid enough to stand around, but when I would stop for water, I would get cold fast. Since that time though, I bought a parka because my friends who had them didn't burn as many calories and were not as beat as I at the end of the day.

I have also used my 20 degree sleeping bag for winter backpacking when it got down to -16 in New York. Sure I was cold, but I still slept fine. Whats winter backpacking without a little discomfort anyway? :D

I know a lot of you may think I'm stupid for doing stuff like that, many of my friends do, but I don't care, a true dirt-bagger doesn't worry about comfort, they worry about getting the job done!
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Postby Autoxfil » Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:32 pm

What would have happened if you sprained your ankle, or worse? It's not about comfort, it's about safety. If you get hurt and don't have extra insulation, you can become dead or at least badly frostbitten in a big hurry.

Rainier in particular - weather makes the climb. If you pick your days carefully, it might be sunny and 30 degrees on the summit. Or, it could be bitterly cold with high winds. Some people are willing to take that chance, but recommending that someone else doesn't need a parka because of one anecdotal trip is dangerous and irresponsible.
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Postby Hotoven » Tue Feb 16, 2010 5:43 pm

Autoxfil wrote:What would have happened if you sprained your ankle, or worse? It's not about comfort, it's about safety. If you get hurt and don't have extra insulation, you can become dead or at least badly frostbitten in a big hurry.

Rainier in particular - weather makes the climb. If you pick your days carefully, it might be sunny and 30 degrees on the summit. Or, it could be bitterly cold with high winds. Some people are willing to take that chance, but recommending that someone else doesn't need a parka because of one anecdotal trip is dangerous and irresponsible.


I carry an emergency Bivy with me in the winter. Also, I was with 2 other dudes who own down jackets. So if I were in trouble, or anyone else was, we would share.

You are correct, I was a little quick to give advice on one personal experience. I had a wonderful time on that mountain, and the weather was almost perfect for me. I don't know the skills of the person I was giving advice too as well, so I should have took that into consideration too. I know my limits, and boundaries and know what I can handle, but now see that giving advice to others based on my standers is not good. Thanks for reveling that to me! :D :D

In Vertical Limit they didn't have parkas, and they were climbing K2! :D
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Postby wargowsky » Tue Feb 16, 2010 6:03 pm

Hotoven wrote:
Autoxfil wrote:What would have happened if you sprained your ankle, or worse? It's not about comfort, it's about safety. If you get hurt and don't have extra insulation, you can become dead or at least badly frostbitten in a big hurry.

Rainier in particular - weather makes the climb. If you pick your days carefully, it might be sunny and 30 degrees on the summit. Or, it could be bitterly cold with high winds. Some people are willing to take that chance, but recommending that someone else doesn't need a parka because of one anecdotal trip is dangerous and irresponsible.


I carry an emergency Bivy with me in the winter. Also, I was with 2 other dudes who own down jackets. So if I were in trouble, or anyone else was, we would share.

:D


Great reply Autoxfil. I completely agree. My first time on Rainier a watched the bodies of two men being flown off the mountain. Even with right gear, they still froze to death in May. Proper gear and knowledge of how to use it is essential on any mountain.

Hotoven, how exactly does one share a down jacket?
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Postby ExcitableBoy » Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:59 pm

My .02 cents:

I have been climbing in the Cascades for 20 years and have climbed Rainier dozens of times in every season from every compass point. I consider a parka to be essential on Rainier. In perfect weather down will work but when you need it most (i.e. when the weather turns to crap) down will fail.

I stopped using down clothing years ago and opt instead for synthetic, hooded jackets. I own two; a Patagonia Micropuff and a Wild Things Belay parka. I only use the Wild Things on Rainier in the dead of winter and in the Alaska Range. The Micropuff gets used much more. If I expect colder temperatures I layer a little heaver under the Micropuff. There are a lot of companies that make good synthetic, hooded jackets. I like the Patagonia because it was way on sale.

On Rainier a good stategy is to dress so you are just warm enough when moving. The parka comes out and is thrown over all your layers at rest stops. If it gets really cold you can wear it while on the move. The key is to not overheat and sweat through your layers.

Hope that helps.

EB
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Postby kevin trieu » Tue Feb 16, 2010 8:47 pm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3QWyMmZZBmM

Rainier in late May. Day 1 & 2 were absolutely freakin' gorgeous. Day 3 & 4 were survival mode. Sure, leave that parka at home. :?
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