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Does watered down Mountain House taste like salt?

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Postby peladoboton » Mon May 10, 2010 12:56 am

Catamount wrote:I wonder if that camper down below gets cable TV?

Image


i remember pulling the crux move on my first 5.10 with a heroic battlecry that woke the campers 200 feet below in the campground in American Fork Canyon....

....that was one that required a significant gear haul....can't beat Escape Buttress!!!!
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Postby peladoboton » Mon May 10, 2010 1:24 am

knoback wrote:
peladoboton wrote:
knoback wrote:Hell yes! If I'm going climbing, I want to climb, not go for a goddamn hike. That's the boring crap you do for training or family vacations. That said, most of the trad climbers I know will do what it takes to get to good routes or away from the crowds. They just won't enjoy it, and why should they? Trail running is fun, mountain biking is fun, humping a pack full of gear uphill is an annoyance.


uh, for some reason, hauling a load of gear up a steep long approach gets me even more excited about a climb and makes me feel like i have earned it more.

Then you are one sad, sick individual - more power to you. As for me, if I could make Garnet Canyon and the 'trail' from Big Sandy to the Cirque of the Towers magically disappear (leaving the climbing intact of course) I'd do it in a second.


dude, you should read up on the misery that the early guys went through to reach the lower saddle....the 9+ switchbacks wouldnt seem so miserable
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Postby rhyang » Mon May 10, 2010 3:09 am

Oh sure, I see lots of sport climbers signing up on summitpost :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby MoapaPk » Mon May 10, 2010 3:42 am

I'm not a climber, so I get to look at this debate with a distant amused eye. I've found that when I am with trad climbers, I can blame anything on sport climbers -- global warming, the recession, sinking of the Andrea Doria -- and they will heartily agree.
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Postby Aaron Johnson » Mon May 10, 2010 3:53 am

Rock climbers seem to be interested only in fair-weather climbing too.


That would be me. I used to rock climb, I used to climb in snow. I got tired of bad weather. I no longer tolerate the cold very well from working in it, from climbing in it, from camping in it. So now I'm a fair weather mountain climber. I'm what may be considered "old" by a lot of you, but I'm still going at it, albeit in nice weather, thank you very much. There's nothing wrong with executing one's passion in NICE WEATHER. It makes it more fun! :D

That being said, there's something to be said for those that love to suffer in low temps, raging storms and adverse conditions. I did it once, long ago. I understand the appeal. Does that mean I'll do it that way forever? Nope. Not this guy.

I also agree with ksolem. There are many things one should do for well rounded physical training to prepare to actively undertake one's passion. And it gets harder as you get older to maintain that level of physical ability. It's hard work and it takes tenacious determination. If we don't, that ability can be lost very quickly. I'm thankful I still have the strength to persevere, and I can still march folks half my age into the ground.

That being said, SP's young members would do well to take such comments to heart and treat yourselves well, so you can be doing these same activities when you're my age and older (if you really want a shining example, check out Bryan Benn), and here's the important part: FEEL really good while doing it, FEEL better than I feel at my age. Start young with your training and maintain it, stay focused on it, and treat yourself right. Get plenty of sleep, eat right and do all you can to protect yourself, so you're always well and strong enough to pursue YOUR passion.

Make it a priority. It will pay off. Big time!
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Postby The Chief » Mon May 10, 2010 4:10 am

Aaron Johnson wrote: I still have the strength to persevere, and I can still march folks half my age into the ground.


This is the grandest of all statements on this thread.

I love to eat them youngn's up for breakfast and when they beg me to slow down or even stop to take a break.

My favorite come back....

"This Old Man kicking your ass...AGAIN!"



Feels good actually to make them young guns beg for mercy.
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Postby Andinistaloco » Mon May 10, 2010 4:25 am

knoback wrote:the 'trail' from Big Sandy to the Cirque of the Towers


Ugh. I hear you, man. The first thing I thought of when I saw that sentence was... mule shit. Now, that sucks. I'd rather think about the great climbing, not the constant downpours which turned the trail into a mule diarrhea ditch.

MoapaPk wrote:I'm not a climber, so I get to look at this debate with a distant amused eye. I've found that when I am with trad climbers, I can blame anything on sport climbers -- global warming, the recession, sinking of the Andrea Doria -- and they will heartily agree.


You mean sport climbers aren't responsible for those things? Why... why... why... you ghey liberal muslim!

The Chief wrote:
Aaron Johnson wrote: I still have the strength to persevere, and I can still march folks half my age into the ground.


This is the grandest of all statements on this thread.


Hell yes. Although for the last few years it would have been implausible, I now have hiking partners half my age. That "dude, can we slow down a bit" is (guilty pleasure) music to my ears.
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Postby CClaude » Mon May 10, 2010 3:30 pm

Andinistaloco wrote:In general, my experience is that they are. I've climbed tons of easy and moderate stuff in Sedona that no one seems to know about... because you have to fight through class 3 and 4 crap rock and bushwhacking for a couple hours to get there. Whereas the 5.12 stuff that's a five-minute walk from the road's been done hundreds of times by the same very skilled climbers that couldn't be troubled to make the approach on the other stuff.


Which would be too bad, since the best route in Sedona is 1.5 to 2 hrs hike in, but it won't see much traffic anyways.
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Postby CClaude » Mon May 10, 2010 3:33 pm

peladoboton wrote:
knoback wrote:Hell yes! If I'm going climbing, I want to climb, not go for a goddamn hike. That's the boring crap you do for training or family vacations. That said, most of the trad climbers I know will do what it takes to get to good routes or away from the crowds. They just won't enjoy it, and why should they? Trail running is fun, mountain biking is fun, humping a pack full of gear uphill is an annoyance.


uh, for some reason, hauling a load of gear up a steep long approach gets me even more excited about a climb and makes me feel like i have earned it more.


To me, its all part of the overall experience. As for crappy weather,.... it just makes it a different experience, but an experience all the same.
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Postby ksolem » Mon May 10, 2010 4:21 pm

I’m more of a rock climber than mountaineer, and I switch it up between sport and traditional all the time, but my best times climbing have been at crags which are at least somewhat remote.

My favorite place to climb is The Needles, in Sequoia. I had a good laugh a couple years ago when some writer in Climbing magazine referred to this area as “back country” climbing. A car camping area with a two mile approach, mostly on a freeway trail with a little up and down but no actual elevation gain is now back country? Next thing we know Tahquitz Rock will be a back country crag. Really, that’s not a Harley you can hear from the summit is it?

My friends and I climb lower down the Kern Canyon in the winter. Where we go the rock is fantastic. The approach is two miles, gaining 500 ft in the first mile and 1500 in the second with a bit of class III here and there. I have never seen anyone up there I did not know. Most of the climbers I do know won’t go there despite the fact that it is some of the best winter climbing in socal. I find the hike to be spectacular, but your average crag rat just won’t sack up for it. Like 2K of gain is a big deal…

And don't let me see you rap bolting up there or it's "game over."

Even in Joshua Tree I would much rather walk an hour or so than climb near the road. This will get you away from most of the people, and you can experience the beauty of the place while you climb. My old friend Charlie used to say “We’re deep in the desert now…”

I’m thinking about another trip to The Gorge of Despair summer of 2011. There are several good formations back there which I have not yet climbed. The question remains, will one of my contemporaries go in with me or will I have to sign up some younger person who is willing to get their ass kicked?

I’ve always thought the whole thing about sport climbers and big legs is just weak sauce. A stronger body is a stronger body. All of this super specialization does not pay off in the long run. The best climbers I know do not think that way at all.

Last I heard we’re doing Cactus to Clouds tomorrow. Probably have to climb some snow up high.

There you have it: ethics, spray and slander all in one post. Carry on. 8)
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Postby rhyang » Mon May 10, 2010 5:04 pm

ksolem wrote:I’m thinking about another trip to The Gorge of Despair summer of 2011. There are several good formations back there which I have not yet climbed. The question remains, will one of my contemporaries go in with me or will I have to sign up some younger person who is willing to get their ass kicked?


I keep wanting to visit this place. Just the approach to Mt. Harrington is a butt kicker. As your Gorge of Despair page states -

This pass leads to the upper entrance of the Gorge. When you cross the pass you are in about 10 miles and have gained about 6,200 ft.


I've also read about a 5.7/5.8 route on the east face of Mt. Harrington -

http://www.climber.org/TripReports/2006/1517.html
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Postby Alpinisto » Mon May 10, 2010 5:05 pm

MoapaPk wrote:[...] sinking of the Andrea Doria [...]


It didn't sink due to a mid-ocean collision, as the history books would have you believe. The sporties torpedoed it with a bolt gun!


(The truth is out there.)
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