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Getting in Shape to climb Mt. Whitney

Tips, tricks, workouts, injury advice.
 

Re: Getting in Shape to climb Mt. Whitney

Postby Zzyzx » Tue Aug 31, 2010 11:36 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:
nancybloomfield wrote:Last year I made it to 14,000 feet and then had to turn back and let my spouse summit alone.
I got altitude sickness along with feeling weak.
Does anyone have suggestions for a 59 year old women to get in shape to summit Mt. Whitney? Right now I am doing the Biggest Loser Boot Camp workout and running 4 miles 2 times a week. Whenever I get a chance I carry 20 lbs. in my back pack and hike hilly terrain.


Stop and rest 10 minutes out of every hour on the trail.

Drink water frequently. If bladder, well, sip frequently. If more of a canteen type of person, drink as much as you can at each 10 minute rest stop. Don't like force it and over drink though.

EAT some food, whatever you like (don't worry about space age bullshit, if you like, for example, peanut butter sandwiches and glazed donuts... take em. Its important to eat. What's not important is having the latest fad in outdoor crap food). Eat at every rest stop, even if its only 2 or 3 bites.

Walk at YOUR pace, not your partner's. Breathe through the nose most of the time. If you find yourself huffing and puffing, particularly on the lower part of the mountain, SLOW DOWN.

Lastly, at some point you have to 'push through' whatever it is that ails you, on a given hike/climb if you are going to top out. Its your decision - turn back or keep going. Stubbornness alone may get you to the top but be careful you don't spend your last internal resources (nothing left for the descent).

Eat often, drink more often, rest 10 minutes out of every hour, and WALK YOUR OWN PACE.

The exercise you're doing sounds fine to me.

DMT


Nancy, that's pretty much all you need to get to the summit of Whitney. If you have time the day before you can also drive to a higher elevation and do some easy hiking. That may help a little with acclimatization. White Mountain is one of the places where you can drive to over 10,000 feet.
Good luck with your next attempt!
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Postby chrismarks » Wed Sep 01, 2010 4:13 am

I tired Whitney myself this year, I was pretty out of shape and had done no real climbing or hiking in almost two years. So I decided I was going to devote myself to training. Three days a week I went out running, at least once a weekend I did some hiking, and since I live in california, backpacking a legitimate option near the coast, so I threw that in as well.

I wish I did more acclimation but I do feel like I did a lot right.

I work up well before dawn and got going on the trail and that allowed me to take my sweet sweet time. I drank plenty of water along the way, probably 5 or 6 full nalgenes. I rested often, including a full hour for lunch at Outpost Camp.

I actually turned around due to my poor campon technique, but I seemed to have made the most of my poor physical condition by just going super slow and fueling myself often.

My attempt: http://www.backcountrybliss.net/2010/06/mt-whitney-main-trail-inyo-national.html
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