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Good Books

Post general questions and discuss issues related to climbing.
 

Re: Good Books

Postby Buz Groshong » Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:19 pm

I read Boukreev's book after Krakauer's and although I enjoyed the first part of "Climb," I thought the last half of it was just a pissing contest, complaining primarily about Krakauer. I also enjoyed the first half of Krakauer's "Eiger Dreams," but found the second half of it mostly ego boosting drivel. I thoroughly enjoyed Whymper's "Scrambles Amongst the Alps." I enjoyed "Desert Solitaire," but have met some folks who didn't enjoy it, but who did like Abbey's "The Monkey Wrench Gang," which I also enjoyed.
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Re: Good Books

Postby Finarphin » Tue Dec 06, 2005 6:14 pm

Annapurna, Maurice Herzog. Can't be beat.

The Crystal Horizon, Reinhold Messner. He fell into a crevasse and lived to tell the tale.

The Romance of Mountaineering, by R.L.G. Irving is a good survey, even though by now it's a bit old.

I also personally liked a book by Elizabeth Knowlton about one of the German expeditions to Nanga Parbat; I forget the title. It was well written.
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Re: Good Books

Postby Nelson » Tue Dec 06, 2005 6:23 pm

The book by Knowlton was titled "The Naked Mountain". It's another one sitiing on my shelf, but not read yet. One of these days...

BTW, the info about the title was found right here on <a href="http://www.summitpost.org/mountains/display_component.pl?type=component&mountain_id=100&route_id=&component_id=3742&object_id=3742 ">SP</a>!
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Postby HungarySagehen » Fri May 28, 2010 12:31 am

Lost Horizon by James Hilton is an amazing book for anyone interested. Not primarily about climbing, but it factors into the book quite a bit
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Postby peladoboton » Fri May 28, 2010 6:12 am

Best book I've read on a trip in a long time was Hemingway's "The Sun Also Rises".

Pure debachery in post WWI Paris. Great stuff.
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Postby dskoon » Fri May 28, 2010 6:21 am

Hemingway took off with that book.
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Postby Marmaduke » Fri May 28, 2010 6:29 am

The Long Walk looks like a must.

How about "Missing in the Minarets, The Search for Walter A. Starr"
Problem is the price of the book. Would anybody want to let me borrow it? Please?
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Postby tigerlilly » Fri May 28, 2010 11:27 am

I'm reading The Bookseller of Kabul right now by Asne Seierstad. It is incredible.

The book grabs you with the first sentence and it is impossible to put it down. A friend warned me that this would happen!
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Postby adventurer » Fri May 28, 2010 3:11 pm

I just finished "Walking the Gobi" by Helen Thayer. In 2001, when she was 63 and her husband Bill was 71, they made a 1,600 mile crossing of the Gobi Desert in Mongolia on foot!! Unbelievable story!!
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Postby Mike Swiz » Fri May 28, 2010 5:06 pm

I really enjoyed Bill Bryson's A walk in the woods which is about trying to hike the AT. I preferred Into Thin Air over The Climb but that's just me.

Right now I'm reading Between a rock and a hard place by Aron Ralston. I'm about 3/4 of the way through and so far a good read.
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Postby Mike Swiz » Fri May 28, 2010 5:10 pm

I have to mention No shortcuts to the Top by Ed Viesturs. It's not a great read but has some good stories in it. He just kinda comes off as a show boater towards the end of the book. Not that it isn't an amazing achievement but...

Anyone else read that book and agree / disagree.
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Postby peladoboton » Fri May 28, 2010 7:44 pm

Mike Swiz wrote:I have to mention No shortcuts to the Top by Ed Viesturs. It's not a great read but has some good stories in it. He just kinda comes off as a show boater towards the end of the book. Not that it isn't an amazing achievement but...

Anyone else read that book and agree / disagree.


didnt get to the end of the book. i picked it up in february and about halfway through i jumped into freedom of the hills and started training, and then started climbing again like i mean it.

and hell yeah, i'm going climbing again this afternoon!!!
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Postby Mike Swiz » Fri May 28, 2010 10:49 pm

peladoboton wrote:
Mike Swiz wrote:I have to mention No shortcuts to the Top by Ed Viesturs. It's not a great read but has some good stories in it. He just kinda comes off as a show boater towards the end of the book. Not that it isn't an amazing achievement but...

Anyone else read that book and agree / disagree.


didnt get to the end of the book. i picked it up in february and about halfway through i jumped into freedom of the hills and started training, and then started climbing again like i mean it.

and hell yeah, i'm going climbing again this afternoon!!!


Amazingly enough I have yet to read Freedom of the Hills, I just haven't gotten around to it yet but it is on my list being as it's referred to as the "bible of mountaineering."
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Postby Augie Medina » Fri May 28, 2010 11:28 pm

Mike Swiz wrote:
Amazingly enough I have yet to read Freedom of the Hills, I just haven't gotten around to it yet but it is on my list being as it's referred to as the "bible of mountaineering."


Personally, I wouldn't read it cover to cover, but rather pick chapters on skills you need to refresh (or learn). Of course, in time, you'll cover the whole thing.

For other mountaineering books see this LIST
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Postby Mike Swiz » Sat May 29, 2010 2:50 pm

Mountain Impulse wrote:
Mike Swiz wrote:
Amazingly enough I have yet to read Freedom of the Hills, I just haven't gotten around to it yet but it is on my list being as it's referred to as the "bible of mountaineering."


Personally, I wouldn't read it cover to cover, but rather pick chapters on skills you need to refresh (or learn). Of course, in time, you'll cover the whole thing.

For other mountaineering books see this LIST


I will keep that in mind when I do pick it up.

An excellent list by the way.
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