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hydration, cramping, recovery and all that

Tips, tricks, workouts, injury advice.
 

Postby Brad Marshall » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:39 pm

Hey MikeTX, I suffer from similar symptoms on expeditions. Mine also starts in the hip (right side only though?) and progresses to wicked cramps in the small of my back. I couldn't tell from your post if you're doing any of this already but, if so, please disregard.

I have two suggestions. First, try to hyperhydrate at the start of each day. We usually do this by drinking one liter of water as we are getting ready in the morning to replace the water lost throughout the night when breathing in dry air. The second would be to drink throughout the rest of the day by taking small sips but very often. My understanding is that the body can only absorb water at a specific rate so if you stop every hour or so and take big gulps it's not that efficient and you end up peeing more out than you should.

Good luck.
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Postby RayMondo » Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:16 pm

Take care not to consume too much water in any one period. Water is toxic in large quantities because it dilutes the electrolytes. Possible to drop dead if one drank many litres in one go.

I've never suffered from cramps. Whether my high intake of Salt (Sodium Chloride - the Sodium part) plays a contribution, I don't know. Though the body also needs Potassium for electrolyte balance. Try plenty of bananas.
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Postby Brad Marshall » Wed Mar 24, 2010 4:28 pm

Very interesting article. I always thought my cramps were related to hydration but perhaps they're not.
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Postby MoapaPk » Wed Mar 24, 2010 4:44 pm

We had a similar discussion a year or so ago. One fellow presented articles suggesting that cramps were more due to overuse, with little contribution from hydration or electrolytes in the short run.

In one study, the hydration and electrolyte levels of runners were monitored. Those who got cramps (during athletic activities) did not have hydration or electrolyte levels significantly different from those who did not. Bear in mind that all started the activity with proper levels.
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Hydration

Postby E_Rolls » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:18 pm

Hydration needs are different for everyone. I, being a very heavy sweater lose a ton of sodium and tend suffer from hyponatremia sypmtoms if I don't balance electrolite intake with water.
After my last outing solo this has become a most important necessity and I need a lot more than I imagined.

I've never heard of Cytomax. I started using an electrolite supplement "Sicaps" and have had good results. Contains four different salts and potassium
Also, if you bulk up on electros before you really get moving you won't sweat as much.

If you don't like poppin pills, V8 and raisins the highst form of potassiium I've found. Bananas seem to be kinda low on the scale and I don't care for them .
I think anyone who perspires profusely owes it to themselves to find what works for them. Cramping or staggering? What's worse in the bc? I prefer niether.

Cheers -E
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Postby MoapaPk » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:46 pm

Read into it what you will; I'm not saying this exercise is typical of mountaineering.
http://hwmaint.bjsm.bmj.com/cgi/content ... t/38/4/488

Note "significant" from a statistical analysis perspective is not the same as "clinically significant."

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1150229/

http://217.19.231.189/customers/SPORTS% ... -Drank.pdf
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Postby jordansahls » Wed Mar 24, 2010 5:50 pm

I would not recommend hyper hydrating, this is not going to help you hydrate at all, instead its going to lead to hyponatriemia which is low sodium serum levels. To much water, and not enough sodium means that your body is going to piss out all of that water until it reaches an equilibrium, which leaves you even more dehydrated than before.

I used to have lots of problems with hydration until I started using Nuun (http://www.nuun.com/) which is amazing stuff. Give it a try, or look around for other electrolyte replacement products (as others have suggested). I really like it because its very light weight, packs down easily, and dissolves to give the proper ratio of water-electrolytes.
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Postby RayMondo » Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:14 pm

Muscle twitches

Wheter related to cramps (which I don't get), I don't know. But anyone have any ideas on what those little localised twitches are. Like a small portion of muscle is tugging in a series of rapid twitches. You might have seen horses do that.
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Postby jordansahls » Wed Mar 24, 2010 6:41 pm

MikeTX wrote:i'm wondering about the role that calories/carbs play in this issue. if i skimp on fuel, am i more susceptible to cramping?


A majority of our electrolytes come from the food that we eat, so I would think so. Plus, stress hormones, such as Cortisol can play a big role on balance of electrolytes in the blood. And I'm guessing that any climber on an extended climb (especially at altitude) has elevated levels of Cortisol.
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