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Kids and Climbing/Hiking

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Postby Stu Brandel » Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:43 am

Most of the best ideas have already been mentioned

1 Scrambles over long hikes (See this trip reoprt for my discovery of this principal: http://www.summitpost.org/trip-report/399576/Scrambling-with-an-11-Year-Old.html

2 Lots of Food as reward at end of day
3 Have them bring friends, or bring their fun crazy uncle
4 Relax at night
5 Plan for Swimming holes along the way if possible
6 Rest day to do tourist stuff (mini golf etc)
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Postby phydeux » Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:24 am

Sbrande wrote:Most of the best ideas have already been mentioned

3 Have them bring friends, or bring their fun crazy uncle


That's ME! I'm the crazy uncle that knows this stuff around L.A. Here's what my nephews/nieces have found fun and interesting:

Since you're in L.A., try some of the lower peaks with great views: Sandstone Peak and/or Malibu Creek in the Santa Monica Mountains, maybe the peaks around Big Bear Lake (crowded Bertha Peak or lonely Gold Mountain, both with great views on top). All are around 3 miles one way/ 6 mile RT.

Maybe drop a few $$$ and do the hike up Mt. San Jacinto from the Palm Springs Tram? Costly, and longer (11 miles RT at higher elevation), but the Tram ride is pretty cool for a noob, Round Valley Meadow looks cool, Wellmans Divide's view is great, and the summit view is always pretty spectacular for the first time. Also fun to go out to Josuha Tree NP and scramble around, drive up to Keys View for the great overlook of the Coachella Valley, and maybe mountain biking on the fire roads in the park, too.

Just some suggestions . . .
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:26 am

Sbrande wrote:Most of the best ideas have already been mentioned

1 Scrambles over long hikes (See this trip reoprt for my discovery of this principal: http://www.summitpost.org/trip-report/399576/Scrambling-with-an-11-Year-Old.html

2 Lots of Food as reward at end of day
3 Have them bring friends, or bring their fun crazy uncle
4 Relax at night
5 Plan for Swimming holes along the way if possible
6 Rest day to do tourist stuff (mini golf etc)


...sounds like a plan :)

many thanks
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Feb 09, 2010 2:30 am

phydeux wrote:
Sbrande wrote:Most of the best ideas have already been mentioned

3 Have them bring friends, or bring their fun crazy uncle


That's ME! I'm the crazy uncle that knows this stuff around L.A. Here's what my nephews/nieces have found fun and interesting:

Since you're in L.A., try some of the lower peaks with great views: Sandstone Peak and/or Malibu Creek in the Santa Monica Mountains, maybe the peaks around Big Bear Lake (crowded Bertha Peak or lonely Gold Mountain, both with great views on top). All are around 3 miles one way/ 6 mile RT.

Maybe drop a few $$$ and do the hike up Mt. San Jacinto from the Palm Springs Tram? Costly, and longer (11 miles RT at higher elevation), but the Tram ride is pretty cool for a noob, Round Valley Meadow looks cool, Wellmans Divide's view is great, and the summit view is always pretty spectacular for the first time. Also fun to go out to Josuha Tree NP and scramble around, drive up to Keys View for the great overlook of the Coachella Valley, and maybe mountain biking on the fire roads in the park, too.

Just some suggestions . . .


Thanks for the suggestions. The tram in Palm Springs certainly will impress them. And I like the High Country in that area a lot. Joshua Tree sounds great too. A lot of bouldering there to do. Thanks again.
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Postby Alpinisto » Tue Feb 09, 2010 1:25 pm

-Go at their pace. (I always have to watch myself here, as I'm a normally fast hiker.) Struggling to keep up with dad or make X miles in Y time to get to camp before dark prob'ly isnt' their idea of a good time.

-Make it fun for them. (We might enjoy "roughing it" in a bivy sack, but doesn't mean the kids necessarily will.) So far, I haven't made my kids carry their own packs yet, though they'll start with light loads this summer.

-Set low expecations at first, and then gradually work up from there. A fun two-hour afternoon hike will make them want to go out again more than a two-day slogfest through the rain and mud. (Hell, just getting the kids away from all the damned screens is a success in my book!)

-Know that, at the end of the day, all kids are different and some just may not dig hiking/climbing/camping and that's OK. Love 'em just as much anyway.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Feb 09, 2010 4:10 pm

Alpinisto wrote:-Go at their pace. (I always have to watch myself here, as I'm a normally fast hiker.) Struggling to keep up with dad or make X miles in Y time to get to camp before dark prob'ly isnt' their idea of a good time.

-Make it fun for them. (We might enjoy "roughing it" in a bivy sack, but doesn't mean the kids necessarily will.) So far, I haven't made my kids carry their own packs yet, though they'll start with light loads this summer.

-Set low expecations at first, and then gradually work up from there. A fun two-hour afternoon hike will make them want to go out again more than a two-day slogfest through the rain and mud. (Hell, just getting the kids away from all the damned screens is a success in my book!)

-Know that, at the end of the day, all kids are different and some just may not dig hiking/climbing/camping and that's OK. Love 'em just as much anyway.


Great advice, thanks. Nice words at the end.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Tue Feb 09, 2010 4:13 pm

MikeTX wrote:
they both were complaining at the end, but they had fun exploring. exploring. ever since that day, i try not to use the h-word.



Good idea to avoid the word "hiking"; sounds boring and tedious. Adventure and exploring is more fun. Yeah, I can understand that. The pic where your kids are scrambling up the rocks...my kids would love that too. Thanks.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Wed Feb 10, 2010 3:59 pm

gbeane wrote:I have a 1.5 year old son (born exactly 18 months ago today, boy that has flown by). We've been taking him out hiking and snowshoeing since he was about a month old. He loves it, and I hope he still does once he is older (and daddy isn't carrying him any more). He also seems to like spending time at the family camp (gas lights, no running water). I've just started taking up rock climbing (this winter, so all my time has been in a gym so far), and hopefully that will be something we can do together when he is older.

There was this one traumatizing hiking incident, but he forgave me pretty quickly - I was hiking with him in the fall in Acadia National Park, he was small (born in August, a month early) so he was still in the chest carrier, but had graduated to facing forward. I took a spill and caught myself with my hands with his face about an inch from the ground. When I was going down all I could picture was a broken nose at best, but he escaped without injury. That was one of the worst feelings in the world.


Yes, I was carrying my kids in these carriers all the time too when they were little. We went out basically every weekend. We did many really long hikes with a lot of elevation gain with these carriers. It was fun. Once they were old enough to walk by themselves they gradually lost interest over the years until they completely stopped enjoying it (at least that's what they tell me before the hikes) when they were around 8 years old.

I am glad that incident did not cause any injuries to your baby. I was worried about that many times myself.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:10 pm

Dougb wrote:I've hiked with my kid 2-300 times (at least) and the worst thing that has happened was that she got stung by a bee. I didn't see it in time and it got her. The one thing I'm concerned about where I live is her stepping on a snake. But generally, hiking with kids is a relatively safe exercize, the dangerous part is the driving. The exhausting part for me is keeping her mentally engaged, and happy, and going at a very slow pace. I used to memorize children's books and regurgitate them on the trail, now we just make up our own story as we go. More than one person has told me "they grow up fast" and boy they weren't kidding. It won't be long til she's gone and I'll be lucky to see her at Christmas.


Yeah, I am always worried about their safety when we are at some more remote places outdoors. We ran into rattlers many times, sometime too close for comfort. My kids find that very interesting and thrilling. I have to hold them back usually to not get closer. We went to the Eastern Sierra many years ago and the kids were running quite a bit ahead of me along a trail. Then I saw two coyotes fairly close to them. I was really very scared and made sure to keep them close by (at least in reach) after that. Yeah, worries come along with being a parent.
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Postby SoCalHiker » Wed Feb 10, 2010 4:34 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:
Its the human part of these adventures, where the real danger lurks. A snake, coyote, or lion... million to one, imo.

DMT


I totally agree. But the worries will still linger in the back of my head every time we go outdoors.
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