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Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby lopgok » Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:49 am

ExcitableBoy wrote:
mistdaemon wrote: I suspect you are trying to claim that I use two accounts. Care to put money on it? Any amount, as long as you actually have to money to pay me.

No shit Sherlock, and yes. Hiding behind two separate IP addys doesn't change your writing style.

lopgok wrote:And I am not mistdaemon, though you seem to think so (with absolutely no evidence)

Me thinks the lady doth protest too much.


Me thinks you have no clue. How much money do you have to bet?
Put up, or shut up. I will bet $1000.00 US that I am not mistdaemon.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Fri Nov 18, 2011 12:56 am

Deleted User wrote:Put up, or shut up.


Looks like you just got shut up. Deleted. Ouch!
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby cadence218 » Fri Nov 18, 2011 3:22 pm

Is the waterproof socks efficient in trapping moistures from your feet?
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Fri Nov 18, 2011 3:47 pm

cadence218 wrote:Is the waterproof socks efficient in trapping moistures from your feet?


VBL socks are very good at trapping moisture in your feet. VBL socks require a fastidious attention to your feet to avoid trench foot. Frequently changing one's liner socks, drying one's feet, and medicated foot powder all help.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby mistdaemon » Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:07 pm

Well, you seem to like false statements and you prefer to try to deflect the real issue to other things.

I am not hiding behind two IP addresses, that is a complete and utter lie from you. I made an offer to you, but talk is cheap, action is harder, so please let me know if you want to take me up on the offer. I suspect not since you really know the truth. Your claim that the writing style is the same if funny. Perhaps you are posting as two people to try to defend yourself, but I am not, as the admin of the site should be able to determine.

Perhaps you will learn about VB and try it, then you might have a valid opinion on the subject.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Vitaliy M. » Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:35 pm

mistdaemon, you think it is convenient to have a two sleeping bag set up (one inside the other) and sleep without your clothes(which will be cold in the morning)? How many times a night do you need to wake up and vent? What if you oversleep and don't vent?
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Fri Nov 18, 2011 6:46 pm

mistdaemon wrote:Well, you seem to like false statements and you prefer to try to deflect the real issue to other things.

I am not hiding behind two IP addresses, that is a complete and utter lie from you. I made an offer to you, but talk is cheap, action is harder, so please let me know if you want to take me up on the offer. I suspect not since you really know the truth. Your claim that the writing style is the same if funny. Perhaps you are posting as two people to try to defend yourself, but I am not, as the admin of the site should be able to determine.

Perhaps you will learn about VB and try it, then you might have a valid opinion on the subject.

Go climb something.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby mistdaemon » Fri Nov 18, 2011 7:39 pm

Vitaliy M. wrote:mistdaemon, you think it is convenient to have a two sleeping bag set up (one inside the other) and sleep without your clothes(which will be cold in the morning)? How many times a night do you need to wake up and vent? What if you oversleep and don't vent?


You are incorrect, please don't make claims as to what I think. My sleeping bag has the VB built into it.

You need to wake up the same amount of times to vent regardless of whether you have a VB bag or not, but if you don't have a VB bag it means that all the moisture is going into the insulation and it does not come out as easy as you would like. The fact is that you get used to it and know what to do so that it becomes second nature and you don't even think about it any more, but I think you are still more aware of the need to properly vent, both with a sleeping bag and with clothes.

When you are learning on how to deal with a VB, you will get hot and sweaty. The first time I used one it was horrible and I said I would never use one again, but then in doing some research (curious) I realized my mistakes and tried it again, then I bought my own.

Morning is really not much of an issue actually as you have some time in which you will still be very warm when you get up. It could be because your body greatly reduces the sweat needed to keep your skin moist, so until your body realizes that more sweat is needed for the skin, you can get dressed and be warm.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Sierra Ledge Rat » Fri Nov 18, 2011 8:42 pm

When I was on Denali (Mid-to-late May) it dropped to minus 35 degrees F inside of the tent.

When I was on Denali in late May-Early June it was so warm that we got rain (not snow) below 10,000 feet.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Dane1 » Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:38 pm

I've climbed a few things in Alaska over 8 seasons and used a VBL inner bag or a sleeping bag with a sew in VBL everytime. Done the same many many seasons in winter while in the Canadian Rockies. VBL socks aren't VBL bags by any means.

When I go back to Alaska this spring I suspect I use a custom VBL down bag again,
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby JHH60 » Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:47 pm

If you use a VB liner in your sleeping bag, will your damp socks, inner boots, pants, etc. still dry out overnight if you sleep with them in your sleeping bag? I haven't used a VB sleeping bag liner but I would guess that wet stuff would stay wetter inside a VB lined bag than in a non-VB lined bag.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Gimghoul » Fri Nov 18, 2011 11:56 pm

Suffice it to say I won't be using a VBL other than inside my socks.

Thanks EB for the good information. Sounds like my 15 degree synthetic is out. I have a 0 degree down that might work, although I'd hate to suffer at 17000 feet because of a light bag.

My big concern with down was getting soaked if bad stuff happened and I ended up having to dig a snow cave.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Dane1 » Sat Nov 19, 2011 1:26 am

You put the wet gear between your VBL and your bag..it drys just fine there. You put on dry clothes to sleep in inside the VBL. They don't get wet as long as you keep your head out of the VBL.

A lot and I do mean a LOT of mis-info on VBLs in this thread.
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby JHH60 » Sat Nov 19, 2011 2:18 am

Dane1 wrote:You put the wet gear between your VBL and your bag..it drys just fine there. You put on dry clothes to sleep in inside the VBL. They don't get wet as long as you keep your head out of the VBL.

A lot and I do mean a LOT of mis-info on VBLs in this thread.


In my case at least I was just asking a question - not trying to spread misinformation. How does this work if the VBL is sewn in? Do you leave an unsewn space to stick your gear in between?
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Re: Lightest Bag for Alaska Range?

Postby Vitaliy M. » Sat Nov 19, 2011 2:30 am

mistdaemon wrote:
Vitaliy M. wrote:mistdaemon, you think it is convenient to have a two sleeping bag set up (one inside the other) and sleep without your clothes(which will be cold in the morning)? How many times a night do you need to wake up and vent? What if you oversleep and don't vent?


You are incorrect, please don't make claims as to what I think. My sleeping bag has the VB built into it.

You need to wake up the same amount of times to vent regardless of whether you have a VB bag or not, but if you don't have a VB bag it means that all the moisture is going into the insulation and it does not come out as easy as you would like. The fact is that you get used to it and know what to do so that it becomes second nature and you don't even think about it any more, but I think you are still more aware of the need to properly vent, both with a sleeping bag and with clothes.

When you are learning on how to deal with a VB, you will get hot and sweaty. The first time I used one it was horrible and I said I would never use one again, but then in doing some research (curious) I realized my mistakes and tried it again, then I bought my own.

Morning is really not much of an issue actually as you have some time in which you will still be very warm when you get up. It could be because your body greatly reduces the sweat needed to keep your skin moist, so until your body realizes that more sweat is needed for the skin, you can get dressed and be warm.


A claim wouldn't have a question mark in the end, would it? Was previous question a claim? LOL You are amusing. I asked you questions about it, because I never used one, that's it. In my opinion when it is -20 in the tent there is no way in hell I want to be naked putting on clothes!
By the way I did not need to vent in my down bag once during the whole trip, and it did not end up weighting 35 pounds somehow...must be magic.
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