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Medicine For a First Aid Kit

Discussion of medical or rescue topics related to climbing and mountaineering.
 

Medicine For a First Aid Kit

Postby Rthorn » Tue May 19, 2009 2:56 pm

I went through my First Aid Kits lastnight and got rid of the stuff that expired. I was wondering where the best place to replenish my supplies. Also anyone know where to get a suture kit?
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Postby pinscar » Wed May 20, 2009 3:18 am

What ever it is that is lacerated should just be irrigated well with clean water (doesn't need to be sterile), and then butterfly it closed with thin strips of duct tape. Next, get to trained medical help and have it evaluated.

Unless you're in the market for a major infection, suturing in the field is highly contraindicated.

pinscar, EMT-P
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Postby Brad Marshall » Wed May 20, 2009 3:38 am

Don't know where you could get a suture kit but serveral climbers I know carry the 3M Steri-Strips for closing wounds.

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Postby SpiderSavage » Wed May 20, 2009 5:15 am

I don't think anyone makes good first aid kit supplies. Stuff at the average drugstore is very expensive in my opinion. My first aid kit is based on a fresh roll of athletic tape, some gauze pads, a few bandaids, lots of moleskin and scissors, some ibuprophen and a triangular bandage. I'm pretty well first aid trained and that covers most everything I can imagine.

Perhaps Pinscar can reveal the sources that EMT's use to fill their first aid kits?
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Postby pinscar » Wed May 20, 2009 6:18 am

SpiderSavage wrote:My first aid kit is based on a fresh roll of athletic tape, some gauze pads, a few bandaids, lots of moleskin and scissors, some ibuprophen and a triangular bandage. I'm pretty well first aid trained and that covers most everything I can imagine.


I don't recall whether or not it was on this forum, but there you go: That's good solid kit that will cover most everything you should be tackling in the woods. Anything more than what you can handle with those items and it's time to get to an emergency department.


SpiderSavage wrote:Perhaps Pinscar can reveal the sources that EMT's use to fill their first aid kits?


Well, you'd be surprised. Winters I work as a ski patroller (pro division), so all my supplies are provided by the mountain; I replenish my patrol vest from the base area clinic after every run. Summers I guide south of the equator and we're provided with a big honkin' kit with everything from flagyl to a King airway to a trach set-up. In both cases, though, I have no idea as to whence the supplies are ordered.

My advice to the OP would be to do what SpiderSavage does: Keep it simple and keep it smart. That is, minimum gear + maximum knowledge.
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Postby Pablohoney » Wed May 20, 2009 8:29 am

My experience "adventure medical kits" are pretty top notch with good quality supplies, though I usually have to add and subtract a few supplies to personalize the kit. Otherwise, I usually get my supplies from my ER, if you have access it's nice as you can put together exactly what you want.

adventure medical kits makes a suture kit:

http://www.adventuremedicalkits.com/pro ... roduct=132


Just curious where you head to with your kit that you need suturing supplies? Although not contraindicated, closing wounds in the field by suturing is indeed quite risky and should be carefully considered. I wouldn't do it on my overnights to Colorado 14neers (nor did I bring the stuff to Denali with me recently). However, if you are in the middle of mongolia for a month, might not be a bad idea.
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Postby Rthorn » Wed May 20, 2009 3:26 pm

I have had a nice ammount of medical training(from the millitary), and have given sutures before. I use to get a suture kits from a friend. The main reason I am looking for one is for my dogs not for a person. Plus the neddles that comes in the kits are the best, and are very handy.
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Postby rhyang » Wed May 20, 2009 3:37 pm

Possibly this place -

http://www.chinookmed.com/

Haven't ordered a suture kit from them however ..
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Postby Pablohoney » Wed May 20, 2009 3:39 pm

As for the med kit companies I disagree. The new kits are great. You just have to be smart when you pick them up. I never go with any of the kits "recommendations." They'll tell you if you are out for so many days with so many people you need such and such a kit. Way overkill. I use one of the ultralight kits by adventure med kits and they are more then sufficient for extended trips. A pair of gloves and tape is a great start, a few extras can make you comfortable and there's nothing wrong with that in the back country. Admittedly a bit more pricy then if you put it together yourself, but hey whatever floats your boat.

FYI most of the docs who are the med directors for the med kit companies all sit on the wilderness medical society board.

As for meds previously listed, or the original posters want for a suture kit, or anything beyond gloves and tape it way just depends on where the heck you're going and for how long. If we're talking about a suture kit for trips in Colorado that's insane...in fact it would be rare to be in a position to suture in the field...it is taking quite a chance for infection. I do agree with most of the previous posts that suturing in the field is pretty dangerous. But if you're going to siberia for two months with a large expedition, have a significant wound and have suturing skills, suturing MAY be an option.
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Postby e-doc » Fri May 22, 2009 5:09 am

I like the Minimal equipment/maximum knowledge quote. Even more important is maximum experience! For kits, I usually take duct tape. Sometimes I'll take a first aid kit, just depends. I don't think you can pigeonhole every procedure into do/don't do as every situation is different.As far as where to restock, just depends on what. Personally I have never been in a situation where I needed my first aid kit and didn't have. Ones wits and ingenuity will help u fix many things. I've never seen much of anything bad in the woods but if someone has a bad multi system trauma out in backcountry, they are pretty much toast
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Postby Day Hiker » Fri May 22, 2009 6:52 pm

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Postby Yeti » Fri May 22, 2009 9:00 pm

The simlest advice you can get is to simply read the name of the kit:
First
Aid
Kit
"First Aid" does not imply healing anyone, just giving aid. Your kit should center around; cleaning wounds (and keeping them clean), stopping bleeding, and imobilizing fractures.
SAM splint
Gauze pads
Tape
Betadine/alcohol/peroxide
20ft basic rope
Maybe some bandaids
Water will already be in your pack.

Add in a sharp knife, som scissors, and tweasers to pull material out of wornds, and you'll be equipped to prep some one for transport.

That's all winderness first aid is intended to do; get the victim into a state in which they can be transported, or move on their own.

Warning: Note that I don't bring pain killers, don't get hurt around me because I won't care how much you hurt. :)
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