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Mountain Climbing and Rock Climbing...do you do both?

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Postby MoapaPk » Wed Sep 15, 2010 12:38 am

SpiderSavage wrote:Nice list of peaks, but she lives in the UK, so think really big hill with a hard rocky bit on one side, scrambling up that in winter, full conditions.


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Postby Andinistaloco » Wed Sep 15, 2010 2:12 am

SpiderSavage wrote:Nice list of peaks, but she lives in the UK, so think really big hill with a hard rocky bit on one side, scrambling up that in winter, full conditions.


Ah, good point. I just started to think of summits that require some rock climbing... and off the brain went. :oops:
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Postby emmieuk » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:31 am

:D I really do appreciate all your help guys! x
Couldnt get in to the rock climbing place this weekend so I shall go the one after. Been reading into it a bit and think possibly finding a beginners outdoor rock climbing would be better as I dont want to get used to griping on to something indoors that wont be there in the real outdoors!!

You have all been a huge help so cheers xx
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Postby Gator » Wed Sep 15, 2010 7:39 pm

I'm more of a mountaineer but rock climb too. This summer I met some people at the Climbers Ranch in the Tetons. One of the girls had climbed in the gunks and was doing well there. This was her first time trying all out mountaineering and it really kicked her ass. Not only was she not prepared for the amount of effort to climb some of these peeks she was totally out of her element in all the transition areas. Moving from tallus, scree, vertical, then wet then back to loose ect., really messed with her. Not to mention all the sections of class 4/5 that were often climbed with out ropes in the name of speed plus all the down climbing. Car to car of the Grand.... out of the question. She learned quickly that you need to be in very good shape for the mountains, climb several grades lower and to leave the Starbucks coffee for the drive up and start climbing routes. She is going to go all out next season and I know she will be fine. Even with all of her frustration she really loved it and has now opened a whole new world.
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Postby SpiderSavage » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:26 pm

Some good tips on this thread. Here's more:

If you're going after some alpine 5.6 (US) you'd better be a solid 5.9 leader at the local crag or much higher in the gym.

That loose crap, at high altitude, with weather conditions, under the deadline of avoiding an epic, will be much harder in real life than it seems in the guidebook. Case-in-point: Mt Whitney, East Face, Shaky-Leg Traverse - A 30 ft, 5.7 layback crack which takes pro easily, onto a ledge covered with a cone of scree, 2000 ft exposure. (whoot-whoot!) elevation about 13,800 ft.
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Postby welle » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:34 pm

Gator wrote:I'm more of a mountaineer but rock climb too. This summer I met some people at the Climbers Ranch in the Tetons. One of the girls had climbed in the gunks and was doing well there. This was her first time trying all out mountaineering and it really kicked her ass. Not only was she not prepared for the amount of effort to climb some of these peeks she was totally out of her element in all the transition areas. Moving from tallus, scree, vertical, then wet then back to loose ect., really messed with her. Not to mention all the sections of class 4/5 that were often climbed with out ropes in the name of speed plus all the down climbing. Car to car of the Grand.... out of the question. She learned quickly that you need to be in very good shape for the mountains, climb several grades lower and to leave the Starbucks coffee for the drive up and start climbing routes. She is going to go all out next season and I know she will be fine. Even with all of her frustration she really loved it and has now opened a whole new world.


Whoa, Gator, at first I thought you were talking about me: Climbers Ranch this summer - check, girl - check, Gunks - check. I had no problems with unroped travel, or scree/talus though. I still would have not done it car to car. Maybe at the end of my trip, when I was fully acclimated not sure... Do you have the contact info of that girl? It'd be great to find another female alpine climber locally.
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Postby CClaude » Wed Sep 15, 2010 9:56 pm

As DMT mountaineering involves a large range of styles and skill sets. If it involves technical climbing, then becoming a proficient rock climber will be either necessary or could improve your efficiency. The indoor gyms while do little to improve the simplest of skills (ie: belaying and some rudimetry techniques (and sometimes advanced techniques depending on the quality of route setting), for a fairly large population of climbers, it is where they maintain climbing specific fitness.

Depending on the quality of staff (it varies from god-aweful to some like my local gym, Flagstaff's Vertical Relief as being really good to excellent), they can be pretty good for beginners or confusing if the staff is poor and only beginners themselves which many gyms employ.
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Postby MoapaPk » Wed Sep 15, 2010 10:32 pm

SpiderSavage wrote:Some good tips on this thread. Here's more:

If you're going after some alpine 5.6 (US) you'd better be a solid 5.9 leader at the local crag or much higher in the gym.

That loose crap, at high altitude, with weather conditions, under the deadline of avoiding an epic, will be much harder in real life than it seems in the guidebook. Case-in-point: Mt Whitney, East Face, Shaky-Leg Traverse - A 30 ft, 5.7 layback crack which takes pro easily, onto a ledge covered with a cone of scree, 2000 ft exposure. (whoot-whoot!) elevation about 13,800 ft.


SpiderSavage wrote:Nice list of peaks, but she lives in the UK, so think really big hill with a hard rocky bit on one side, scrambling up that in winter, full conditions.
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Re: Mountain Climbing and Rock Climbing...do you do both?

Postby Charles » Thu Sep 16, 2010 12:51 pm

emmieuk wrote:So I am thinking of trying some indoor rock climbing and build up some upper body strength to help when climbing mountains...

who here does the two?? do you feel they benefit the other?

Discuss please...Im kind of in two minds...

Hey hi to Scouseland!!
Upper body strength is naturally good for rock/ice climbing. Mountaineering need not be the same as rock/ice climbing though. Depending on what you´re doing and where, can mean you need other skills too. Stamina is, in my opinion, important for mountaineering. Having a big chest 8) does not make it easier to climb mountains. Horses for courses.
Cheers
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Postby emmieuk » Thu Sep 16, 2010 1:49 pm

big chest :lol: :lol:

i can imagine climbing with one those could be a hazzard for many reasons :lol:
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Postby Charles » Thu Sep 16, 2010 2:58 pm

emmieuk wrote:big chest :lol: :lol:

i can imagine climbing with one those could be a hazzard for many reasons :lol:


Like getting your thumbs caught in a crab. gate. :wink:
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Postby emmieuk » Thu Sep 16, 2010 3:36 pm

hahahaha

exactly :wink:
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Postby Gator » Mon Sep 20, 2010 3:33 pm

welle wrote:
Gator wrote:I'm more of a mountaineer but rock climb too. This summer I met some people at the Climbers Ranch in the Tetons. One of the girls had climbed in the gunks and was doing well there. This was her first time trying all out mountaineering and it really kicked her ass. Not only was she not prepared for the amount of effort to climb some of these peeks she was totally out of her element in all the transition areas. Moving from tallus, scree, vertical, then wet then back to loose ect., really messed with her. Not to mention all the sections of class 4/5 that were often climbed with out ropes in the name of speed plus all the down climbing. Car to car of the Grand.... out of the question. She learned quickly that you need to be in very good shape for the mountains, climb several grades lower and to leave the Starbucks coffee for the drive up and start climbing routes. She is going to go all out next season and I know she will be fine. Even with all of her frustration she really loved it and has now opened a whole new world.


Whoa, Gator, at first I thought you were talking about me: Climbers Ranch this summer - check, girl - check, Gunks - check. I had no problems with unroped travel, or scree/talus though. I still would have not done it car to car. Maybe at the end of my trip, when I was fully acclimated not sure... Do you have the contact info of that girl? It'd be great to find another female alpine climber locally.


No not you, a friend from Canada. She is going to meet us again next summer for climbs in the Winds and Tetons.
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Postby AlexeyD » Mon Sep 20, 2010 9:51 pm

Not sure if this has been mentioned already, but rock climbing can also help improve your rope skills, which of course is an essential part of mountaineering. However, if you only climb indoors the benefits of this will be very limited, so I would definitely suggest getting outside, practicing making your own anchors, rappelling, learning to place gear, etc. Many skills that will be useful in the high mountains can be learned on small, local crags.
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Re:

Postby Cissa » Thu Apr 04, 2013 7:05 pm

AlexeyD wrote:Not sure if this has been mentioned already, but rock climbing can also help improve your rope skills, which of course is an essential part of mountaineering. However, if you only climb indoors the benefits of this will be very limited, so I would definitely suggest getting outside, practicing making your own anchors, rappelling, learning to place gear, etc. Many skills that will be useful in the high mountains can be learned on small, local crags.


Agreed. I began with mountaineering and thought I´d never learn all the knots, safety procedures, etc. I went into trad climbing, picked it up quite fast, and it helped immensely with mountaineering. On top of it, dealing well with these techniques will most likely open up the world of technical mountains, instead of keeping one in "walk up" types of mountains.

Plus, long trad routes are really awesome. :wink: Especially if you don´t have anything alpine nearby.
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