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Mountain Climbing and Rock Climbing...do you do both?

Post general questions and discuss issues related to climbing.
 

Re:

Postby WyomingSummits » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:33 pm

Hotoven wrote:
fatdad wrote: IMHO gyms are pretty close to being worthless.


I think so too! :D

Although for starting out and getting use to the ropes they are helpful. By the time you consider yourself a "rock climber" you will hate gyms.


Eh, I'd have to disagree. For many living pretty far away from decent rock, a gym is critical for staying strong while performing climbing specific movements. A pullup bar or weight training definitely won't cut it. In my honest opinion, indoor gyms are why we have 5.15 now. You don't have the commute to the crag or weather to derail your training. There are definitely pitfalls to indoor climbing.....it for sure doesn't replace outdoor climbing by any stretch of the imagination. You don't have weather or altitude to deal with. You get no route finding experience on an indoor wall. You get no gear placement experience. You do get the feel of being on lead on walls that have bolted routes. You get basic rope work experience. The glaring issue is you get no ANCHORING experience. I know a lot of climbers who focus on belaying and placing gear on lead, but don't put a lot of thought into anchor building. So in all, an indoor gym isn't a replacement for outdoor climbing, but it's definitely NOT worthless! :) It's simply another tool at your disposal.
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Re:

Postby WyomingSummits » Sat Apr 06, 2013 4:42 pm

Gator wrote:I'm more of a mountaineer but rock climb too. This summer I met some people at the Climbers Ranch in the Tetons. One of the girls had climbed in the gunks and was doing well there. This was her first time trying all out mountaineering and it really kicked her ass. Not only was she not prepared for the amount of effort to climb some of these peeks she was totally out of her element in all the transition areas. Moving from tallus, scree, vertical, then wet then back to loose ect., really messed with her. Not to mention all the sections of class 4/5 that were often climbed with out ropes in the name of speed plus all the down climbing. Car to car of the Grand.... out of the question. She learned quickly that you need to be in very good shape for the mountains, climb several grades lower and to leave the Starbucks coffee for the drive up and start climbing routes. She is going to go all out next season and I know she will be fine. Even with all of her frustration she really loved it and has now opened a whole new world.


Altitude could have thrashed her too. Mentally, it's just about getting out and getting your brain accustomed. Even guys who climbed for a decade or two can get a bit sketched out if they take a few years off and then dive back in. Like you said, Mountaineering routes that combine distance, weight, weather, altititude, and all aspects of climbing require a level of fitness that is not needed in most other sports. I know a lot of people who considered themselves good athletes who got thrashed on the approach hikes, let alone climbing the actual peak.
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