Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

mountaineering pack recommendations

Post climbing gear-related questions, offer advice. For classifieds, please use that forum.
 

Postby albanberg » Wed Jul 28, 2010 7:12 pm

Vitaliy M wrote:
zeroforhire wrote:^ Sweet score! Those packs are very under-rated.


Yeah, this weekend I will try to keep it under 25lbs, which would be awesome. When I just started out my pack was about 45lbs.

I got a load of deals at those returned gear sales in REI
4 season 370$ tent for 70$
70$ helmet for 30$
165$ cramons for 50$
70$ ice axe for 25$
100$ climbing shoes for 20$ 2ce
350$ arcteryx AWESOME pants for 80$
300$ REI shuksan hardshell jacket for 75$
120$ north face windbreaker for 20$
200$ REI mars 85L backpack for 30$
and all of it as new...awesome


Hey man, stop telling people about the gear sales! lol...already too many people show up for those..
User Avatar
albanberg

 
Posts: 162
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 12:34 am
Location: Mill Valley, California, United States
Thanked: 8 times in 8 posts

Postby Alpinisto » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:06 pm

albanberg wrote:Hey man, stop telling people about the gear sales! lol...already too many people show up for those..


The first rule of REI Garage Sale is: don't talk about REI Garage Sale. 8)
User Avatar
Alpinisto

 
Posts: 554
Joined: Wed Mar 14, 2007 1:39 am
Location: Danbury, Connecticut, United States
Thanked: 5 times in 4 posts

Postby albanberg » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:34 pm

Alpinisto wrote:
albanberg wrote:Hey man, stop telling people about the gear sales! lol...already too many people show up for those..


The first rule of REI Garage Sale is: don't talk about REI Garage Sale. 8)


It's funny that my GF often wants to go and I complain, but then I find things about 50 or 60% of the times that I go. But yeah, keep it quiet...sheesh! lol
User Avatar
albanberg

 
Posts: 162
Joined: Fri Aug 01, 2008 12:34 am
Location: Mill Valley, California, United States
Thanked: 8 times in 8 posts

Postby Buz Groshong » Wed Jul 28, 2010 8:56 pm

For me it depends on the mountains involved. I like having a waist belt to put the load on the hips and off of the shoulders, but that requires a really snug waist belt. When the altitude gets up there, the snug waist belt interferes with the heavy breathing I need to do. So, at least for me, at higher altitudes I'd do better with a frameless pack and a loose waist belt.
User Avatar
Buz Groshong

 
Posts: 2798
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 10:58 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia, United States
Thanked: 664 times in 468 posts

Postby ColoradoLawDobe » Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:14 pm

I've been using the MH Dihedral pack this summer. Its 40 liters and has pockets in all the right spots. Plus a lot of it is Cordura so it is bombproof. It may be heavier than others, but I really enjoy knowing that it is durable. I also got in from Altrec for $62 during a sale they had in May.
User Avatar
ColoradoLawDobe

 
Posts: 53
Joined: Sun Sep 07, 2008 4:56 pm
Location: Highlands Ranch, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby fatdad » Wed Jul 28, 2010 10:21 pm

Vitaliy M wrote:
zeroforhire wrote:^ Sweet score! Those packs are very under-rated.


Yeah, this weekend I will try to keep it under 25lbs, which would be awesome. When I just started out my pack was about 45lbs.

I got a load of deals at those returned gear sales in REI
4 season 370$ tent for 70$
70$ helmet for 30$
165$ cramons for 50$
70$ ice axe for 25$
100$ climbing shoes for 20$ 2ce
350$ arcteryx AWESOME pants for 80$
300$ REI shuksan hardshell jacket for 75$
120$ north face windbreaker for 20$
200$ REI mars 85L backpack for 30$
and all of it as new...awesome


I've been a member for like 30 yrs. When did I miss out on those?

Anyways, I feel like when pack questions come up, I'm always the one who mentions Wild Things or Cold Cold World. Solid packs and designed for climbing, not just schlepping gear. I've had a couple of Ice Sacs, which have gone trekking in Nepal, 3-5 day light trips in the Sierra, a couple of trips up the Captain (in the haul bag), ice climbing in Lee Vining and Ouray. Not cheap but I've been really happy with them.
User Avatar
fatdad

 
Posts: 1377
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 9:39 pm
Location: Los Angeles, California, United States
Thanked: 83 times in 57 posts

Postby JHH60 » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:26 pm

While there have been lots of good pack suggestions here, I'd suggest deciding what what your planned applications are (alpine climbing? rock climbing? ski touring? day hiking?...), what size you want, what your spending limit is, and then visit a well stocked and knowledgeable shop and try some on. I wanted a 50 liter pack for alpine and rock climbing last year and had decided in advance that I wanted a BD Predator based on reviews and the fact that several people I knew had them. But when I went into a local mountaineering shop and tried it and some similarly sized packs on with weight inside, I discovered that the Osprey Exposure 50 was more comfortable on me, and bought that instead.
User Avatar
JHH60

 
Posts: 1151
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2008 6:59 pm
Location: Belmont, California, United States
Thanked: 87 times in 73 posts

Postby Brad Marshall » Wed Jul 28, 2010 11:33 pm

e-doc wrote:
Brad Marshall wrote:Unless you provide more info my only advice would be to get one.


I'm 5-7; ~4-5000 cu" attachments for sharp things, 2 shoulder straps, hip belt


I'm a big fan of Osprey, how about their Aether 70?

http://www.ospreypacks.com/detail.php?p ... escription

You can get one for $194 here:

http://www.theoutfitteratharpersferry.c ... 27s/Detail
User Avatar
Brad Marshall

 
Posts: 1948
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2006 6:54 pm
Location: Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada
Thanked: 17 times in 15 posts

Postby KevinCraig » Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:27 pm

Most important thing, of course, is fit. The best pack is the one that fits your back/body (and of course has the features you need for your planned endeavors).

For alpine "stuff" this leads me to the Osprey Variant series which come in S/M/L even in the smallest version of this pack (the "28" liter). I have a really long back and 99.99% of packs in the 30 liter range don't fit my back and are either awkward or uncomfortable when I stuff way too much stuff in them (as is usually necessary when approaching alpine climbs). The Variant 28 fits/carries very well for me (though, to be fair, the size L is larger than the billed 28 liter volume).

Starting in the 45L size, the Cilogear packs fit me well also, and I feel they are competitively priced with other brands that are made off-shore rather than in the U.S. as Cilogear packs are.

Cilogear is kind of like Crossfit though - you get two extremes: kool-aid-drinkers and haters. It's a complete waste of time to argue with either. Flame-on guys!

:lol:
Last edited by KevinCraig on Sat Jul 31, 2010 12:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
User Avatar
KevinCraig

 
Posts: 463
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 3:48 am
Location: Arvada, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby fossana » Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:04 pm

KevinCraig wrote:Most important thing, of course, is fit. The best pack is the one that fits your back/body (and of course has the features you need for your planned endeavors).

For alpine "stuff" this leads me to the Osprey Variant series which come in S/M/L even in the smallest version of this pack (the "28" liter). I have a really long back and 99.99% of packs in the 30 liter range don't fit my back and are either awkward or uncomfortable when I stuff way too much stuff in them (as is usually necessary when approaching alpine climbs). The Variant 28 fits/carries very well for me (though, to be fair, the size L is larger than the billed 28 liter volume).

Starting in the 45L size, the Cilogear packs fit me well also, and I feel they are competitively priced with other brands that are made off-shore rather than in the U.S. as Cilogear packs are.

Cilogear is kind of line Crossfit though - you get two extremes: kool-aid-drinkers and haters. It's a complete waste of time to argue with either. Flame-on guys!

:lol:


Can't speak to the Variant but I had some major quality issues with the Mutant. After 6 months the pack shows more signs of wear than my well loved Arc'teryx Khamsin I've used regularly for 6+ years. Osprey told me I'd have to pay to ship it to them and they couldn't guarantee the replacement fabric would be any more rugged than the original.
User Avatar
fossana

 
Posts: 1005
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2003 9:31 pm
Location: Boulder, Colorado, CO, United States
Thanked: 38 times in 31 posts

Postby Autoxfil » Fri Jul 30, 2010 8:32 pm

Really, your 2.5lb pack is less durable than your 4.5lb pack? Go figure. Why did you buy an UL pack?

The Variant are bombproof. Super rugged materials.
User Avatar
Autoxfil

 
Posts: 558
Joined: Thu Sep 17, 2009 5:40 pm
Location: NEPA and Upper Jay, United States
Thanked: 36 times in 29 posts

Postby KevinCraig » Sat Jul 31, 2010 12:48 am

I can't speak to the Mutant's quality, but i've used the Variant 28 for alpine for at least a couple of years and their 37 for ice for at least as long and both look nearly new (and one or the other goes out pretty much every weekend day for 8-9 months of the year plus the the obligatory longer road trips).
User Avatar
KevinCraig

 
Posts: 463
Joined: Tue Sep 21, 2004 3:48 am
Location: Arvada, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby sneakyracer » Sat Jul 31, 2010 1:29 am

I have an Osprey Mutant and looks, feels and so far has been pretty bombproof. Its a light simple pack with enough good features to make it versatile but simple enough to be light without using superlight materials. Its about 40-45L.
sneakyracer

 
Posts: 238
Joined: Fri Aug 28, 2009 12:52 am
Location: San Juan, United States
Thanked: 13 times in 11 posts

PreviousNext

Return to Gear

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2013 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.