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Mt. Adams Questions

Regional discussion and conditions reports for Washington and Oregon. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the Pacific Northwest Climbing Partners section.
 

Postby TheViper » Sat Jul 03, 2010 10:03 pm

lol, again...I cannot afford crampons...if I could I absolutely wouldve purchased them, the most I can do is $50
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Postby Autoxfil » Sat Jul 03, 2010 10:31 pm

I have some old school SMC strap ons, brand new. You can use them and then either ship them back or pay me $30 if you want to keep 'em. How's that? I'll send them 2-day air on Tuesday, you'll have them Thursday.
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Postby TheViper » Sun Jul 04, 2010 12:53 am

Well I found the solution, finally...very suprised no one suggested this.


Next Adventure in Portland rents crampons that fit hiking boots, specifically mine...$5 1st day $3 each add, thats one heck of a deal.

Thanks Autoxfil: Def wouldve considered that, although the term "old school" scares the heck out of me, thanks for your offer.
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Postby Moni » Sun Jul 04, 2010 2:22 am

TheViper wrote:Well I found the solution, finally...very suprised no one suggested this.


Next Adventure in Portland rents crampons that fit hiking boots, specifically mine...$5 1st day $3 each add, thats one heck of a deal.

Thanks Autoxfil: Def wouldve considered that, although the term "old school" scares the heck out of me, thanks for your offer.


Why should Old School scare you? I am definitely old school , very much alive and still climbing.

Since I do not live in Portland, did not know of other vendors who rent. Sounds like a screaming deal - so hopefully the crampons aren't museum worthy. Hope your trip goes well and that you have a great time!
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Postby TheViper » Sun Jul 04, 2010 4:24 am

Could still use some more advice from those who have climbed Adams. :)
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Postby billisfree » Sun Jul 04, 2010 11:36 am

I made a few attempts on Mt. Adams, succeeded once.

There's nothing heroic about the climb - its just HARD WORK.
You better be a good hiker/walker, who can hike 10 hours in a day.

Generally, GO SLOW. Two days is great! Pushing yourself
fast, risks headaches, upset stomachs. Be patient, every
five feet of elevation is a vital gain. It just takes time - lots of it.

Go when weather promises to be nice and sunny.

It can be done without crampons, but if snow conditions are
wet and slushy, forget the crampons. I've seen
amatuers climb Mt. Adams without crampons or ice axes.
They seem to do alright - even wearing tennis shoes!
I'm sure the failure rate is higher for them.

Drink lots of water - even when you don't think you need it.
Everybody is different, some do fine with little water, some don't.
You just have to get some personal experience what your body likes.
If your "burn out" for lack of drinking water - it's prob too late to
recover your strength. It's best to go down and try another time.
Your strength will likely recover as you descend.

There's mice at the lunch counter. Keep your food zipped
up in your pack. They chew through tent fabic and plastic bags.
Keep plastic bags tightly closed so mice don't smell the location.

Use an ALPINE START if you can. Get up at 4am, use crampons
if you can and take advantage of firm crampon snow.

If you intend to go without crampons... try not to climb on
frozen snow. Wait till later in day when snow starts to turn
slushy. Slushy snow is frustrating, with the feeling you'll
climb the mountain one and a half times... as your feet
slip back on many of the steps. It also means WET FEET.

Get a bit more oxygen... exhale (blow?) through your lips with a small
opening. This helps your increase air pressure inside your lungs.

Treking poles might be helpful. They're great for recovering balance quicky
if you slip on snow or rocks. Others say, they take pressure
off your knees and back. I prefer only one pole - that keeps
my other hand free for other uses. I use an ice axe above the
lunch counter, but from my experience its not highly important.

Mt. Adams isn't really that dangerous. The south route has
no creavasses. The slope isn't steep enough to slide out of
control - UNLESS it's flat and frozen. Suncups are some
help for your steps... gives you a flatter area to place your
feet.

Take some waterproof pants. Wear them when you glisade
down the "chutes" that previous climbers have created.
Costco used to have some lightweight waterproof jacket
and pants for $39.95 - and they work great.

Don't forget the lotion and chapstick with SUNBLOCK.

I'm NOT impressed with freeze-dried meals. They don't
seem very tasty. Snacks work just fine. Sweet rolls
seem yummy in the monring. A large Hersey Bar has 600 calories.

I'm one of the few that can't EAT and CLIMB at the same
time. Oxygen must go to the legs OR the stomach, but
not both. So when you take your snack breaks, eat first,
then relax for ten minutes afterwards.

Take cough drops in case you get a very dry throat
while sleeping at lunch counter.

Don't forget your sunglasses.

A few people CAN get confused and dis-orientated
even at 10,000 ft, but it's rare.

Try to climb with others around and look after others
in turn.

And above all - RELAX! You can do it!
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Postby Bombchaser » Sun Jul 04, 2010 9:24 pm

I climbed this peak in september 2009. Most of the snow had melted off and it was mostly a steep boulder / scree climb. There were two ice / glacier crossings on the south side route. I had to becarefull in the drainage areas because there would be occasional fist sized rocks that would come screaming down the mountain. There is nothing technical on the south side route, it is just very steep and exausting. I braught about 40 pounds of gear and spent a night at around 11,000 feet or so. I would suggest spending the night, especially if there is still snow. The last I saw the mountain is still covered in snow, so Ice Axe and crampons would be reccommended. And knowing how to use them!!! Watch the weather reports using NOAA or some other good site. The weather out here has not been typical and you need to make sure a storm is not coming in first. Weather can get brutal up there. I would also check to see if the road is open to the trailhead. Again this will likely be a snow ascent.
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Postby lcarreau » Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:28 am

I'm OLD SCHOOL, and PROUD of it!

(1) Forget crampons

(2) Bring portable stove

(3) Rent ice axe for glissading

(4) Monitor local weather

(5) Get an early start from camp

(6) Take lots of pictures

(7) Don't forget - have sum fun !!!

8)
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Postby Moni » Mon Jul 05, 2010 1:56 pm

lcarreau wrote:I'm OLD SCHOOL, and PROUD of it!

(1) Forget crampons

(2) Bring portable stove

(3) Rent ice axe for glissading

(4) Monitor local weather

(5) Get an early start from camp

(6) Take lots of pictures

(7) Don't forget - have sum fun !!!

8)


I would disagree with forgetting the crampons - we got an early start (5am) from the Lunch Counter and were glad to have them. All depends on conditions and time of day.
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Postby lcarreau » Mon Jul 05, 2010 3:06 pm

Moni wrote:
I would disagree with forgetting the crampons - we got an early start (5am) from the Lunch Counter and were glad to have them. All depends on conditions and time of day.



Agreed! When I went, we didn't get up to the "Lunch Counter" till High Noon.

I thought that was WHY they called it the Lunch Counter.

Geez, I wonder if the 'OP' hasn't climbed Adams 5 times already, in the course of this thread.

:lol:
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Postby TheViper » Mon Jul 05, 2010 4:12 pm

quick question...For an average person, how long does it take to climb to lunch counter from the trailhead? From lunch counter to the summit?
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Postby dskoon » Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:31 pm

It's been awhile since I've done it, but, I'd say approx. 3-4hrs. to the lunch counter, or a bit more, and then another 3 or so to the summit. Depends on your conditioning.

Camping at the lunch counter is a great idea,(might be doing it with my son soon), but, you can also do it in a single day's push from the trailhead. I think my time, ctc, was around 11-12hrs. Doing it in a single day definitely leaves you feeling a bit haggard.
Oh, about the crampon question. First, glad you found a cheap rental. Second, it does all depend on conditions. I've done it twice; the first time without, (though I didn't summit due to deteriorating weather), and the second time with. I was glad to have them the second go-around, as the conditions were hardpack and icy. Just depends on what time of day, what month, etc. etc. Better to have 'em if you're starting early in the day, and early on in the summer. Later in the summer, not so necessary, maybe, though my second trip was in Aug. and I was glad to have 'em.
Gloves, make sure you have some damn warm ones, whether you need them or not. My second trip, it was very, very windy up top, and my hands were very happy when they received the backup, heavier gloves.
Good luck!
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Postby Bombchaser » Mon Jul 05, 2010 8:52 pm

Looking at my GPS track it took me about 7.5 hours to reach the ridgeline (11,500 ft) above Lunch Counter just before Pikers Peak. This is where I spent the night. I advise doing this in two days for sure. I was a bit out of shape when I chose to go, and was hauling a 40 pound pack. Total climbing time was about 12.5 hours (includes ascent and descent). The mountain likely has a lot more snow on it then when I went. I would guess most of the route will be snow and ice.
Last edited by Bombchaser on Mon Jul 05, 2010 11:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby TheViper » Mon Jul 05, 2010 9:17 pm

I wonder why my friend said expect it to take 6-7 hours just to reach lunch counter?

He has sumitted Mt. Adams several times.

BTW: the trip (overnight) is scheduled for next weekend
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Postby dskoon » Mon Jul 05, 2010 10:32 pm

My estimate may be a bit off; might be more like 5-6hrs to lunch counter. Again, depends on how much you're carrying(I went really light), and what conditions are like, ie, where the snowline begins, etc.
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