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Western Mountaineering Winterbag: GWS vs MF?

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Western Mountaineering Winterbag: GWS vs MF?

Postby chbla » Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:30 pm

Hi there,

I need some opinions. I will get a Western Mountaineering Lynx sleeping bag for the european alps.
I will use it mostly in small double wall tents, in an event bivy for quick overnights and under a tarp.

I asked WM whether or not I could take MF for this purpose, as it's more breathable and reduces
condensation from inside.
They said it will be no problem unless water is applied with pressure (lying on the snow, against a snow cave, etc)
which I do not intend to do.

I figured that if I would have this problem, I could always use either my Event bivy or a lightweight pertex endurance
bivy which is around the same weight as the GWS shell.
With the added benefit that I can remove the cover and the ice that will build up inside the cover, as opposed to the fixed
GWS shell.

What do you think?
chbla

 
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Re: Western Mountaineering Winterbag: GWS vs MF?

Postby Sunny Buns » Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:45 am

What is MF; and for what purpose are you planning to use it? :?:

This conversation appears to have some answers to your questions:
https://backpackinglight.com/forums/topic/sleeping-bags-outer-fabrics-gore-winds-topper-vs-pertex/

What is GWS? AH HA! Looks like Gore Windstopper. Website says the down filled collar and draft tube fabrics are GWS. What Is that supposed to do for you? Are you thinking you will use the bag without a bivy bag or tent? I wouldn't, but that's up to you.

How many nights in a row will you be using the bag? Are you saying ice will be building up inside of your sleeping bag? Or inside of your bivy bag? :?:

You can wear vapor barrier clothes if the ice is forming due to moisture from your body; or you can use a vapor barrier liner for the bag. These used to be available, not sure if they still are or not, but any long plastic bag stuffed inside your sleeping bag would prevent water vapor from migrating to the sleeping bag - as long as there are no holes in the plastic bag - but you may be at little clammy. :)
Sunny Buns

 
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