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Regional discussion and conditions reports for South America. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the South American Climbing Partners section.
 

Chimbo / Coto

Postby Andino » Fri Aug 18, 2006 8:53 am

Dear Ario,

Thanks for your answer :wink:

Is Chimborazo on the Occidental and Cotopaxi on the Oriental ?
If we trust weather patterns, in May/June, which cordillera is "dry" and which one is "wet" ?

Gracias Amigo.
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you plan sounds good

Postby big_g » Fri Aug 18, 2006 1:26 pm

Being from CO and used to cracking up 4000m peaks puts you in a really good position just like you suspect. You shouldn't need to spend time on anything less than Norte. Besides just being a cool mountain Iliniza Norte is also good practice working out transport and the huts. You'll find Ili N. to be similar to the more interesting CO mountains too so it should be a very comfortable experience on a fun mountain with good views.

cuidate!
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Postby hashfxn » Fri Aug 18, 2006 9:09 pm

Ario wrote:hashfxn,
As far as objective danger on Chimborazo, I can just tell you about the Normal Route (El Castillo) and the First Ascent Route (Southwest Ridge or Original Whymper).

...

Thus, if you compare temperatures for footwear you may want to introduce a corrective factor for a possible difference in altitude.

Keep them worm ;)


Thanks for your replies Ario, much appreciated!
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Postby Scott » Fri Aug 18, 2006 11:40 pm

Things may certainly change, but I just recieved an email from Ecuador saying that Chimborazo is impossible to climb because of the recent bigTunguragua eruption. Since I'm leaving in a few months, I hope it changes, but we'll see.
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Postby hashfxn » Sat Aug 19, 2006 2:29 am

Scott Patterson wrote:Things may certainly change, but I just recieved an email from Ecuador saying that Chimborazo is impossible to climb because of the recent bigTunguragua eruption. Since I'm leaving in a few months, I hope it changes, but we'll see.


Sorry to hear that. Please let us know how it went after you get back from your trip.
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I´m here now

Postby oo09nj76t5 » Sun Aug 20, 2006 8:07 pm

I am in Ecuador this very instant, having just come down from Iliniza Norte. I have been here for a few months, but spent the four days before the climb on Iliniza at the coast. Surprisingly, I found myself not challenged at all by the altitude and felt incredibly strong the whole way up the mountain, which is a fairly easy hike until the last 50 or so vertical meters, at which point it becomes a bit of class four scarmbling; nothing dificult, just a bit exposed.

As for Chimborazo being unclimbable that is not the case at the moment exactly, the only effect Tingoragua (sp?) is having on Cotopaxi is that it is dramatically changing the weather here, with rain falling all over the quito area in a month that is normally noted for its dryness.

When I am done with my time here (in ten days, unfortunately) I will post more info.

Best of Luck

Shay
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Postby Ario » Tue Aug 22, 2006 7:11 am

was in the mountains last days...
Have received this e-mail from Marcial Vasquez the President of the ASEGUIM:

TE COMENTO QUE HOY HEMOS HABLADO CON GUIAS QUE INTENTARON SUBIR AL CHIMBORAZO Y ES POR EL MOMENTO NO IMPOSIBLE PERO SI DIFICIL YA QUE EL VIENTO LEVANTA MUCHO LA CENIZA QUE HA CAIDO SI EN LOS PROXIMOS DIAS CAE UNA NEVADA SERIA PERFECTO, HACE UN MES CON LA CAIDA DE LA PRIMERA CENIZA SE FORMO PENITENTES DE HASTA 3 METROS DE ALTO PERO SE HA PODIDO LLEGAR A LA CUMBRE AHORA ES EL PROBLEMA QUE HAY MUCHO HIELO Y CON LOS PENITENTES MAS DIFICIL DE SUBIR.

SI NECESITAS MAS INFORMACION YO REGRESO DE LA MONTAÑA EL 27 DE AGOSTO, EL COTOPAXI ESTA ESTABLE HE BAJADO HOY DE LA MONTAÑA SIN PROBLESMAS

Bottom line: the ash from the eruption of Tungurahua has resulted in snow melting on Chimborazo: there are "penitentes" as high as 3 meters that have made the climb difficult but not impossible. But the new thing is that the route has now got very icy... The combination was enough for the guides to stop any organized ascents but they are looking forward to resume the activity (they think a good snow fall will be enough). The eruption has apparently no major impact on ascents of Cotopaxi.
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Postby Ario » Tue Aug 22, 2006 7:48 am

Shay,
what you’re describing is not surprising at all. Several months at 2800m = being fully acclimatized and 4 days @ sea level is not enough to brake that down. All it does, with the increase of O2, is charging your batteries to an impressive level ! :D
I bet you didn’t sleep at the hut and did it strait from the parking, didn’t you?! :wink:
Congratulations for the ascent !
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Postby Ario » Tue Aug 22, 2006 8:15 am

Myzantrope,
oui Chimborazo (Occidental) et Cotopaxi (Oriental).
If I remember well, they used to say Oriental wet season is from April to September (dry season October to March) and Occidental dry season is from April to September (wet season October to March)...
I don't know much about weather but noticed a considerable snow fall on Chimborazo in June 2005 !!! Enough deep fresh powder snow to run me out of power at my first attempt :(
Furthermore, Cotopaxi is a popular all-year-round climb. Apparently, it would be more cloudy in the "wet season" (in June) and more windy in the "dry season" (in January).

Again, I would recommend not to take this kind of information for granted...
pense a emmener ta boule de cristal avec toi :wink:
Last edited by Ario on Tue Aug 22, 2006 9:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Andino » Tue Aug 22, 2006 11:17 am

Thanks Ario !
You're a great weather man :wink:

Do you have (by any chance) any good information on weather in Northwest Argentinian Andes ? :)
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Postby Scott » Tue Aug 22, 2006 4:48 pm

Dry season in the Occidental is supposed to be June through August with a second shorter but less windy season in Mid-December through Mid-January.

Dry season in the Oriental is supposed to be November through February (but October through January for Cayambe).

Cotopaxi can be attempted year round.

March through May is supposed to be the worst season throughout Ecuador.

At least according to all the guidebook authors, and who knows what Mother Nature will dish out.

Do you have (by any chance) any good information on weather in Northwest Argentinian Andes ?


If the Atacama region is what you are speaking about, it is pretty dry year round, but cooler in the winter. Some places are supposed to be easier to visit in winter because water is available, but summer is when most people climb most of the peaks.

Bottom line: the ash from the eruption of Tungurahua has resulted in snow melting on Chimborazo: there are "penitentes" as high as 3 meters that have made the climb difficult but not impossible. But the new thing is that the route has now got very icy...


Thanks for the info! Good to know! I guess things might change for the better or worse by the time we go. It seems that everytime I plan to climb something 20,000+ feet, something happens before we go! :evil: Still, there are other peaks to climb if Chimbo conditions aren't good. :D
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Postby Andino » Tue Aug 22, 2006 5:07 pm

Dear Scott,

Sorry if I was not clear when I mentioned "Northwest Argentina" : I was thinking of Cachi/Salta region, to climb Nevado de Cachi (6380m). I read somewhere that the weather there, is quite similar to Bolivia (rather than Puna de Atacama).

If so, it may be rainy/snowy if we go there in late February, next year...
Any idea ?
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Postby Scott » Tue Aug 22, 2006 9:01 pm

Sorry if I was not clear when I mentioned "Northwest Argentina" : I was thinking of Cachi/Salta region, to climb Nevado de Cachi (6380m). I read somewhere that the weather there, is quite similar to Bolivia (rather than Puna de Atacama).

If so, it may be rainy/snowy if we go there in late February, next year...
Any idea ?


I haven't been there, but according to Michael Kelsey, the best time to climb it is April through October, with November through March being the wet season.

Mike did however climb neaby Chani in January 1982. He says he had only one clear day out five.

Mike Kelsey probably knows the area better than anyone I know, and you could try emailing him (kelsey@canyoneering.com). He also wrote the book Climbers and Hikers Guide to the Worlds Mountains if you wanted to give it a peek.

I'm actually going on a 4-day trip with Mike Kelsey next week I could ask him some questions for you if you would like, and since I haven't been there and can't tell you anything other than is in his book. Otherwise, you may just want to drop him an email.
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Cachi

Postby Andino » Wed Aug 23, 2006 2:59 pm

Thanks a bunch !
Actually, we want to go to Cachi (not Chani) but there are quite close to each other.

If you get the occasion to ask Michael Kelsey about the Cachi Region (weather in February/March, climbing on Nevado Cachi, etc...) when you see him, that would be great ! :P

Cheers !
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Postby neoday » Sat Sep 02, 2006 8:26 am

I would seriously think about Iliniza Sur. It is an excellent climb- if the conditions are good. And if you are already in the area, what is one more day? It is not a long time- like 5-7 hours rt from the hut, but you get good altitude gain and some great climbing. There was one tough mixed section that we had to negotiate, but that was about it. Getting down it was the toughest, and we just rigged a 30m rap/boot axe lower. last guy downclimbed. I would listen to Big-G- he knows his stuff and was down there for a while. he is the MAN!
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