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Cordillera Huayhuash

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Cordillera Huayhuash

Postby Andinistaloco » Tue Apr 17, 2007 2:25 am

Lots of folks are saying it'd be best to go there, due to the restrictions in the Cordillera Blanca. Okay... so, has anyone here climbed there recently? I've heard that the peaks there might be fairly difficult to solo and also heard bad things about Shining Path guerillas in the area. Anyone got information on the subject?
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Postby Buz Groshong » Tue Apr 17, 2007 3:18 pm

I'd forget about the shining path, but there have been instances of plain old armed robbery. As I understand it, the area is relatively safe if you go with a group, but might be a bit risky if you are on your own. The camping areas near villages should be relatively safe and I would guess that once you get off of the trekking circuit path there won't be any significant risk. You still might want someone to guard your camp while you are climbing though.
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Postby Andinistaloco » Wed Apr 18, 2007 12:56 am

Thanks, Buz. Got any ideas about the difficulty of the peaks in the area? I'm usually comfy soloing up to AD+/D or so, but I've heard that many of the peaks (Yerupaja, Jisrishanca) don't have routes that are that easy. Appreciate the info in advance....
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Postby Damien Gildea » Wed Apr 18, 2007 2:36 am

If you haven't already got it, you need to get Jeremy Frimer's guidebook to the area (Google for it).

From what I know from friends who've been, esp. on the eastern side of the range the approaches are the real problem, up glaciers and icefalls that are increasingly broken. Generally the peaks are pretty steep, though of the main peaks the west side of Jirishanca doesn't look too bad. The normal route on Yerupaja used to be the west face, but no one went there during the Shining Path years and in that time the warming broke it up considerably, so it's rarely done - though it did get soloed a couple of years ago.

Some good general pics at: http://www.photoseek.com/peru/Huayhuash.html

Best map, a 1:50 000 topo, is by these guys: http://www.alpinemapguild.com/ but should be available online via Google.

D
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Postby Buz Groshong » Wed Apr 18, 2007 7:11 pm

Juh33:

I'm not at all in your league when it comes to climbing, so I really can't help you there, but I'll PM you a couple of contacts who might be able to provide some info.

I'll also add that the CB is much more accessible than the Huayhuash, so I wouldn't dismiss the CB too quickly. You'll probably have to start in Huaraz in either case, since it is a good place to start acclimatizing and get supplies. Transportation down to the start of a hike-in for the Huayhuash could be expensive, so that should be considered in deciding between the two.

The world has plenty of people who will gladly take some money for doing nothing, so it might be possible to find a local guide who will tag along in the CB and just let you do your own thing. Unfortunately they might want the standard fee and might expect you to hire a cook and porters, etc. Another possibility is a guide who already has a client and would let you tag along to a base camp area and then go solo. Once you are in the park, you are not likely to see any park officials (all they do is watch the gates and collect the fees).
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Postby Andinistaloco » Wed Apr 18, 2007 9:02 pm

Damien Gildea wrote:If you haven't already got it, you need to get Jeremy Frimer's guidebook to the area (Google for it).

From what I know from friends who've been, esp. on the eastern side of the range the approaches are the real problem, up glaciers and icefalls that are increasingly broken. Generally the peaks are pretty steep, though of the main peaks the west side of Jirishanca doesn't look too bad. The normal route on Yerupaja used to be the west face, but no one went there during the Shining Path years and in that time the warming broke it up considerably, so it's rarely done - though it did get soloed a couple of years ago.

Some good general pics at: http://www.photoseek.com/peru/Huayhuash.html

Best map, a 1:50 000 topo, is by these guys: http://www.alpinemapguild.com/ but should be available online via Google.

D


Damien, thanks for the info. I suppose I could get the book... however, I was thinking that if the easiest routes to all the high summits in the Huayhuash are ED and TD, then there's no point in my even ordering it - I'm not going to solo stuff that technical.

Great pics at that site, too.


Buz Groshong wrote:Juh33:

I'm not at all in your league when it comes to climbing, so I really can't help you there, but I'll PM you a couple of contacts who might be able to provide some info.

I'll also add that the CB is much more accessible than the Huayhuash, so I wouldn't dismiss the CB too quickly. You'll probably have to start in Huaraz in either case, since it is a good place to start acclimatizing and get supplies. Transportation down to the start of a hike-in for the Huayhuash could be expensive, so that should be considered in deciding between the two.

The world has plenty of people who will gladly take some money for doing nothing, so it might be possible to find a local guide who will tag along in the CB and just let you do your own thing. Unfortunately they might want the standard fee and might expect you to hire a cook and porters, etc. Another possibility is a guide who already has a client and would let you tag along to a base camp area and then go solo. Once you are in the park, you are not likely to see any park officials (all they do is watch the gates and collect the fees).


Thanks again Buz... eh, you're probably just too smart to solo stuff, unlike me. Appreciate the info about the possibility of a "guide" doing nothing... it's a thought, but then again my Spanish isn't the greatest so I'm not sure how well I could negotiate things. Sounds like you know a bit about the process - have you heard of "guides" there who'd do something like let someone tromp along to BC for a nominal fee and then let folks cruise off? That'd be ideal, I think.
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cordillera huayhuash

Postby TonyP » Fri Apr 20, 2007 8:54 pm

I was there twice last year and returning again mid july of this year. I had no problems during my visit, the shinning path era is over but like any other place crime still a fact. During my second trip i made a summit attempt on Mt Pisco but needed to retreat about 600 ft from the summit do to weather conditions. Thats what i get for climbing in December. All in all had a great time.
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Postby MichaelJ » Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:18 pm

Damien Gildea wrote:If you haven't already got it, you need to get Jeremy Frimer's guidebook to the area (Google for it).
D


This post is the first hit on Google I got! I've tried to find the book online before without any luck. His AAJ reports however are available online on the club's web site.

Edit: Just scored a copy!
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Postby Brad Marshall » Fri Apr 20, 2007 11:32 pm

MichaelJ wrote:
Damien Gildea wrote:If you haven't already got it, you need to get Jeremy Frimer's guidebook to the area (Google for it).
D


This post is the first hit on Google I got! I've tried to find the book online before without any luck. His AAJ reports however are available online on the club's web site.

Edit: Just scored a copy!



How about here:

http://www.chesslerbooks.com/eCart/view ... oduct=3018
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