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restrictions in parque nacional huascaran

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Cordillera Blanca Access Issue

Postby MRoyer4 » Tue Jan 20, 2009 11:53 pm

I found this on the ever-changing access restrictions in the Cordillera Blanca: http://www.theuiaa.org/news_detail.php?ID=93

From my experience last year (although it was before this news article), things seemed to go on a case-by-case basis. Some had no issues, some had to sign something, some were hassled but let through...who knows. Personally, the park office in Huaraz told me they wouldn't give me a park pass, even just to go in and trek, without a guide. I went anyway and purchased a pass from someone at the access point without issues.

Has anyone heard any updates on this subject? Specifically, did anyone have problems late last year (post-July)? Also, did anyone comply with the 30 day regulation? I don't quite know how that would work since the only way I know to get a park pass is in person upon arrival.
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Postby kylenw » Wed Jan 21, 2009 12:07 am

I was climbing there until August 10th last year and never had any problems although I did join the AAC prior to leaving in order to climb without a guide.

I used both the Quebrada Llanganuco entrance and the Quebrada Ishinca entrance. At both guard stations they were considerably more interested in making sure you had paid the 65 soles climbing park pass fee than making sure you were a member of a UIAA affiliated climbing club. I never tried to buy my pass in Huaraz, I just paid at the guard stations at the entrances to the park.

The climbers I was with who did not have membership with a club typically just claimed to be trekking instead of climbing. This worked well. But, like I said, they mostly just wanted to collect money from everyone.

There were definitely no problems with the 30-day registration period. Nor was there any need to indicate an itinerary to the guard station or anyone else.

But who knows what will happen this season.
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restrictions

Postby georgen » Wed Jan 21, 2009 4:03 pm

What about restrictions in Bolivia?As far as I know there should not be restrictions at all.But for how long??
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Re: restrictions

Postby Haliku » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:08 pm

georgen wrote:What about restrictions in Bolivia?As far as I know there should not be restrictions at all.But for how long??


There aren't any restrictions in Bolivia at this point. Considering how few climbers Boliva sees compared to Peru I don't see Peru like restrictions being a concern. Bolivia needs climbers to visit and spend. Cheers!
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Postby TYeary » Fri Jan 23, 2009 6:17 am

I was there climbing for a month last summer. My group climbed in several valleys. We got our 30 day park ticket and had no real problems. But restrictions are coming. I would suggest contacting Chris Benway at the Cafe Andino, in Huaraz or Beto Santillan(www.andesmadness.com) for real, up to date info. You have to remember, this is Peru. Because they checked you at the Ishinca today doesen't mean they will tomorrow. We found it was a bit of hit and miss.
Environmental issues are among the stated reasons behind the new regulations. Please, if you are climbing in the Blanca( or anywhere for that matter) please clean up your base camp area. Use the out houses, like the composting toilet in the Ishinca, the out houses in the Santa Cruz and Alpamayo base camp ect... Leave it cleaner than you found it. I bring large trash bags and hand them out to neighboring groups, as a way to encourage self-policing. I am not always greated with smiles, but if we, as climbers, don't become pro-active in helping to conserve and preserve this resource we use,( which is a privilege, not a right) then the Peruvian Goverment have no choice but to emplace new restrictions. We can help to mitagate their actions by being responsible NOW.
Sorry for the rant.
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enviroment

Postby georgen » Fri Jan 23, 2009 3:17 pm

To keep mountains tidy is without any doubt very important thing but I do not think that Peruvians care about taking rubbish back to valley.To hire a guide is clearly about money not about enviroment.
TYeary wrote:I was there climbing for a month last summer. My group climbed in several valleys. We got our 30 day park ticket and had no real problems. But restrictions are coming. I would suggest contacting Chris Benway at the Cafe Andino, in Huaraz or Beto Santillan(www.andesmadness.com) for real, up to date info. You have to remember, this is Peru. Because they checked you at the Ishinca today doesen't mean they will tomorrow. We found it was a bit of hit and miss.
Environmental issues are among the stated reasons behind the new regulations. Please, if you are climbing in the Blanca( or anywhere for that matter) please clean up your base camp area. Use the out houses, like the composting toilet in the Ishinca, the out houses in the Santa Cruz and Alpamayo base camp ect... Leave it cleaner than you found it. I bring large trash bags and hand them out to neighboring groups, as a way to encourage self-policing. I am not always greated with smiles, but if we, as climbers, don't become pro-active in helping to conserve and preserve this resource we use,( which is a privilege, not a right) then the Peruvian Goverment have no choice but to emplace new restrictions. We can help to mitagate their actions by being responsible NOW.
Sorry for the rant.
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Postby Buz Groshong » Fri Jan 23, 2009 4:05 pm

georgen wrote:

To hire a guide is clearly about money not about enviroment.


So what's wrong with that? The average Peruvian makes about $2 per year (in cash income). Arrieros get $10 a day plus $5 for each burro. Mountain porters get $25, cooks $50, and mountain guides $100 a day. Many of us earn $25 to $50 an hour or more, and we get that all year round, not just seasonally. So why shouldn't they make a bit of money off of us when we go down there?
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Postby TYeary » Fri Jan 23, 2009 4:30 pm

Yes , you are right. It is about the money. Everything is ultimately about the money.
We are not going to stop the quest for funds dead in it's tracks, but we can make a difference. The AAC and the Mountain Institiute found that it was the enviromental practices of the LOCALS, not "eco-tourists" who impacted the environment below the snow line. If we as a group can limit our impact below and above the snowline, then the Goverment's argument is weakend, and the looming restrictions modified in our favor. The new regulations are not just about having to hire a guide. And you are right about the locals: they are not going to pick up "gringo shite" for free. However, the young men who work at the Ishinca Hut are servicing the composting toilet ( info from Adam French via the AAC) without pay and are taking pride in doing something good for the environment and those down valley who are the direct benefactors of cleaner water for crops and human consumption. Small change is a start and if we collectivily "pitch"in, we can make a difference. We can continue to use the park relativily un-restricted and manage the resource for the better. That is the goal. If we don't meet this challenge I can see a day when there may be peak fees, a environmental deposite fee(partialy refunded upon leaving) and other types of fees imposed upon us. Thanks for your ears.
Tony
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park fee

Postby georgen » Sun Jan 25, 2009 11:26 am

I do not have any problem to pay much higher park fee/eg $200 or more/if this helps enviroment and local comunity.I can afford guide too but I do not want to do so because I want to climb without guide`s help.There should be always choice-to hire or not to hire a guide.... :wink:
Buz Groshong wrote:georgen wrote:

To hire a guide is clearly about money not about enviroment.


So what's wrong with that? The average Peruvian makes about $2 per year (in cash income). Arrieros get $10 a day plus $5 for each burro. Mountain porters get $25, cooks $50, and mountain guides $100 a day. Many of us earn $25 to $50 an hour or more, and we get that all year round, not just seasonally. So why shouldn't they make a bit of money off of us when we go down there?
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Postby georgen » Sun Jan 25, 2009 11:40 am

I can agree with all the restrictions excluding that you have to hire a guide,porters even for the easy summits.
TYeary wrote:Yes , you are right. It is about the money. Everything is ultimately about the money.
We are not going to stop the quest for funds dead in it's tracks, but we can make a difference. The AAC and the Mountain Institiute found that it was the enviromental practices of the LOCALS, not "eco-tourists" who impacted the environment below the snow line. If we as a group can limit our impact below and above the snowline, then the Goverment's argument is weakend, and the looming restrictions modified in our favor. The new regulations are not just about having to hire a guide. And you are right about the locals: they are not going to pick up "gringo shite" for free. However, the young men who work at the Ishinca Hut are servicing the composting toilet ( info from Adam French via the AAC) without pay and are taking pride in doing something good for the environment and those down valley who are the direct benefactors of cleaner water for crops and human consumption. Small change is a start and if we collectivily "pitch"in, we can make a difference. We can continue to use the park relativily un-restricted and manage the resource for the better. That is the goal. If we don't meet this challenge I can see a day when there may be peak fees, a environmental deposite fee(partialy refunded upon leaving) and other types of fees imposed upon us. Thanks for your ears.
Tony
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Postby TYeary » Fri Jan 30, 2009 6:10 am

hapas wrote:I have lived and worked in the Cordillera each season for the last 8 years. The rule is an impossible one for the park to fulfill as there are not enough guides to guide even the trips that want guides much less the hundreds of people that enter the park each day without guides.
The good news is the park is so completely disorganized and corrupt that they have no way of enforcing the rules that they generate. I would not worry too much about the park as there are many ways to get around their rules. This last year if you showed them your AA club card that was enough to let you in.
Good luck!


There is some truth in the above post. However, putting your head in the sand will help nothing and no one. It is not a good enough argument to say, "because they can't; they won't." They will try and the result will be chaotic at best. He who resignes himself to fate, finds that fate always accepts your resignation. I prefer to be pro-active and and not resigned.
Tony
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