Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

Entry level digital SLR

Post climbing gear-related questions, offer advice. For classifieds, please use that forum.
 

Canon G11

Postby wasclywabbit » Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:32 pm

I use a very high tech method to keep my G9 dry. I put it in a zip lock bag then inside a LowePro case. I keep an eye on the bag for holes and replace it when it gets one.

If heavy rains come I'll double bag it and put it in my pack.
User Avatar
wasclywabbit

 
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:31 pm
Location: Denver, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby verdeleone » Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:34 pm

My ultra-light camera protection system:
Image

EDIT:It's a picture of a plastic bag with my trusty G5 in it - I apparently can't use the effing computer!
User Avatar
verdeleone

 
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue May 01, 2007 4:36 pm
Location: Midpines, California
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Postby connollyck » Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:16 pm

Nikon D3000 :D :D
User Avatar
connollyck

 
Posts: 110
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 11:57 pm
Location: Roseville, California, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby nartreb » Tue Dec 08, 2009 2:18 am

Any old case will be fine. Keep a ziploc folded at the bottom in case of really heavy downpours or tough river crossings. Snow is not a problem, just brush it off. (But: keep a spare battery in a warm pocket near your skin.) The leaking-camelback scenario shouldn't happen: If you're keeping your camera in your backpack, switch to a smaller camera!
User Avatar
nartreb

 
Posts: 2190
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:45 pm
Location: online or in boston, Massachusetts, United States
Thanked: 169 times in 141 posts

Postby EastcoastMike » Tue Dec 08, 2009 3:17 am

nartreb wrote:Any old case will be fine. Keep a ziploc folded at the bottom in case of really heavy downpours or tough river crossings. Snow is not a problem, just brush it off. (But: keep a spare battery in a warm pocket near your skin.) The leaking-camelback scenario shouldn't happen: If you're keeping your camera in your backpack, switch to a smaller camera!


Well yeah it shouldn't have happened, it was the perfect storm of bad luck actually.
User Avatar
EastcoastMike

 
Posts: 141
Joined: Mon Jul 16, 2007 9:06 pm
Location: Washington, DC, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

Postby Day Hiker » Tue Dec 08, 2009 5:44 am

nartreb wrote:The leaking-camelback scenario shouldn't happen: If you're keeping your camera in your backpack, switch to a smaller camera!


I know this is a camera thread, so I'll try to keep my interruption brief.

How many times do we have to hear about leaky water bags and nozzles before people realize they suck and people stop using those lame things? You can't even drink fast out of one of those; you have to nurse it like an infant or something. And then the bags, hoses, and nozzles become like petri dishes, with crap and mold growing inside and slime on the nozzle. Blech! Just use a Gatorade bottle, and you can actually slam drink the contents, like a thirsty adult hiker would want to do.

Ok, end rant; back to DSLRs. :D
User Avatar
Day Hiker

 
Posts: 3156
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2003 2:57 am
Location: Henderson, Nevada, United States
Thanked: 61 times in 43 posts

Postby T Sharp » Tue Dec 08, 2009 6:30 am

I use a Lumix LX2, very nice little camera, very nice Leica lens, 12.2 m-pixels 2 modes of IS , and even if zoomed out, I can get very sharp images hand held if I use the auto time mode. Nice macro-focus for those pretty flowers too! I like the camera with reservations, a dslr will likely have a very short [1/4000 sec] delay, where as most point and shoots are more like [1/2 sec] this can be frustrating when shooting very active 2 year old kids or other fast action subjects. I also, like Bob have some issues composing with the led. and would very much like a through the lens view finder. If you can live with those issues, a small point and shoot can create fantastic images you will treasure. I keep mine in a padded Lowe Alpine bag with a pull out rain cover, but like everyone else, if it is wet out it goes in a zip-lock, then in the bag.

Hints about condensation...burp the excess air out of the zip-lock, and let the camera come up to room temp, or in other words, equalize with the surrounding temp before opening the zip-lock.

Happy Imaging!
User Avatar
T Sharp

 
Posts: 662
Joined: Sun May 28, 2006 3:45 am
Location: Missoula, Montana, United States
Thanked: 42 times in 9 posts

Postby nattfodd » Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:26 pm

You might find the following article instructive: http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutor ... bing.shtml

I somewhat disagree about the previous comments, as I think that trading a high-end compact (such as the G11) for a light DSLR with a single zoom lens will is well worth the extra weight, in terms of responsiveness, speed, image quality and versatility, but you can always get great results with whatever you bring, as long as you bother to get it out of the bag.
User Avatar
nattfodd

 
Posts: 208
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:11 am
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Thanked: 10 times in 5 posts

Postby radson » Tue Dec 08, 2009 6:39 pm

I too prefer taking a DSLR.

but..For anyone interested in the LX-3 I have assembled some images taken with Panasonix LX series from sea level to 8,000 m.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/radson/sets/72157622961912388/
User Avatar
radson

 
Posts: 1968
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 11:34 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia
Thanked: 122 times in 86 posts

Re: Entry level digital SLR

Postby thexcat » Tue Dec 08, 2009 6:50 pm

EastcoastMike wrote:Noticed the fiance is really impressed with some of the better outdoor photography on this site and others. Not sure if this is in the right forum, although not sure if qualifies as gear either. Looking to get her a digital slr as a Christmas gift. We are not experienced or knowledgeable when it comes to cameras, so I guess I am looking for something 'entry-level'. Also, since we do a lot of hiking/backpacking/kayaking something suitable for carrying would be excellent. If you have any advice or suggestions they would be really appreciated. Thanks a ton!

- Mike


IMHO - Canon is the way to go. Go for the cheapest dslr body (they are all superb). Then, get a decent lens. The lens selection for Canon mounts is probably the best (nikon would be close too I'd imagine). Don't get a kit lens, they generally suck.

You could go point and shoot as many have suggested. These are very convenient. But then you can't swap out the lens. Nor keep your old lens on a new camera body if you ever decide to upgrade.
User Avatar
thexcat

 
Posts: 123
Joined: Thu Apr 24, 2008 6:25 pm
Location: San Francisco, California
Thanked: 4 times in 2 posts

Postby nartreb » Tue Dec 08, 2009 6:52 pm

In response to natfodd:

Sure, I always carry a DSLR (unless I'm doing vertical climbing or the weather is truly horrendous), because I know that there are some shots that just require the right lens for the job, and there's nothing worse than thinking about "the ones that got away" just because you didn't want to carry an extra pound or two. But I looked at my profile yesterday, and of my top 27 highest-rated shots on SP, 20 were taken with a P&S. So a P&S can easily compete with an SLR in quality* in most situations, and therefore my original advice stands: what you shoot with is less important than that you shoot in the first place, and for that reason, the convenience of a compact P&S is worth a lot.

*obviously quality standards for SP voters are not the same as for certain professional uses. If this thread were about cameras for professional use, my advice would be a bit different.
User Avatar
nartreb

 
Posts: 2190
Joined: Sat Apr 03, 2004 10:45 pm
Location: online or in boston, Massachusetts, United States
Thanked: 169 times in 141 posts

Postby radson » Tue Dec 08, 2009 7:14 pm

nartreb wrote:In response to natfodd:

Sure, I always carry a DSLR (unless I'm doing vertical climbing or the weather is truly horrendous), because I know that there are some shots that just require the right lens for the job, and there's nothing worse than thinking about "the ones that got away" just because you didn't want to carry an extra pound or two. But I looked at my profile yesterday, and of my top 27 highest-rated shots on SP, 20 were taken with a P&S. So a P&S can easily compete with an SLR in quality* in most situations, and therefore my original advice stands: what you shoot with is less important than that you shoot in the first place, and for that reason, the convenience of a compact P&S is worth a lot.

*obviously quality standards for SP voters are not the same as for certain professional uses. If this thread were about cameras for professional use, my advice would be a bit different.


Personally, I wouldn't put too much weight into the merits of a photo based on SP ratings.
User Avatar
radson

 
Posts: 1968
Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 11:34 pm
Location: Sydney, Australia
Thanked: 122 times in 86 posts

Postby nattfodd » Wed Dec 09, 2009 8:45 am

nartreb wrote:In response to natfodd:

Sure, I always carry a DSLR (unless I'm doing vertical climbing or the weather is truly horrendous), because I know that there are some shots that just require the right lens for the job, and there's nothing worse than thinking about "the ones that got away" just because you didn't want to carry an extra pound or two. But I looked at my profile yesterday, and of my top 27 highest-rated shots on SP, 20 were taken with a P&S. So a P&S can easily compete with an SLR in quality* in most situations, and therefore my original advice stands: what you shoot with is less important than that you shoot in the first place, and for that reason, the convenience of a compact P&S is worth a lot.

*obviously quality standards for SP voters are not the same as for certain professional uses. If this thread were about cameras for professional use, my advice would be a bit different.


Sure, I agree with most of that. All I'm saying is that, assuming that you know how to use it well and that you will make the effort to keep it accessible and get it out of the bag often, then a DSLR, even with a single normal zoom lens, will consistently give you much better results than a P&S.
I really mean no offence by that, but I think that the fact that you prefer your P&S shots to your DSLR ones is probably caused by you not fulfilling one of the assumptions.

It's all about what level of image quality you can be satisfied with. If a P&S is enough for what you feel that you need, then that's great (and your back will thank you), but if you want to set high standards, then a DSLR is definitely going to help.
User Avatar
nattfodd

 
Posts: 208
Joined: Fri Aug 22, 2008 1:11 am
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
Thanked: 10 times in 5 posts

Previous

Return to Gear

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2015 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.