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Another AT question

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Another AT question

Postby justing » Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:05 am

Noobie question regarding AT bindings that I haven't been able to answer myself online. I was thinking about getting Diamir Freerides and mounting them on some BD Havocs. I'd like to use this as my one ski for resort and backcountry. What I'd like to do is alternate between alpine boots and AT boots depending on how they're being used that day. Is this possible? I would guess that due to the difference between the soles of alpine boots and AT boots some kind of adjustment would be required for the bindings when I go from using one to the other. Is this easy to do and can I do it myself?

More generally, do you think this setup is a good idea? I was thinking I'd like something a bit beefier than the AT boots for resort skiing, otherwise I'd just get one pair of AT boots for everything and be done with it. I'm 5'10" 168#, generally ski blacks and bumps (not a hucker -- barely understand the term!). The skis will generally be used at Tahoe resorts and area backcountry. Thanks!
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Postby Dow Williams » Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:17 am

You would be hard pressed to use a lighter AT binding and boot then I do....Dynafit race....and I can't imagine why I would have two sets of anything, bindings, skis or boots.
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Postby mtngeek » Thu Feb 18, 2010 5:14 am

I have the last generation havocs (green with the weird face on the tips) mounted with the Freeride+ and use Scarpa Denali TTs with them. I have used this as my only pair of skis for the resort and backcountry. I think it's fabulous, if you're limiting yourself to day/overnight trips in the backcountry. This is mostly because it's such a heavy setup and on a multiday trip I believe it would start to feel that way. But if you stick mostly to resort with a few days in the backcountry, I would highly recommend it.

For the boots, my suggestion is to get one pair of AT boots and use that for it all. Most of the new AT boots can ski as well as an alpine boot. No use in spending a couple hundred dollars extra for a second pair of boots that is sort of irrelevant. Invest that money in a good pair of skins, probe, shovel, and beacon.

FWIW, I skied a pair of the current generation havocs with O2 telemark bindings today and I feel they ski just as well as the ones I have.

EDIT: I guess I didn't actually answer your question, yes you can do this yourself and all you need is a screwdriver.
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Postby pvalchev » Thu Feb 18, 2010 9:10 am

Check out the Dynafit ZZeus. You can actually replace the sole with a few screws and have a DIN alpine sole, or Vibram touring sole. They are overlap design and plenty burly... I've had mine since they first came out, but I personally just ski them with dynafit bindings 100% of the time. They are overkill for me but if you want to have an alpine sole option, this is it. (I also have old Scarpa Lasers that I use for climbing approaches and where skiing quality isn't the main purpose of the tour)
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AT gear

Postby Aksel » Thu Feb 18, 2010 4:43 pm

you would need to adjust the bindings when changing between AT and alpine boots.
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Postby kovarpa » Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:49 pm

mtngeek wrote:
For the boots, my suggestion is to get one pair of AT boots and use that for it all. Most of the new AT boots can ski as well as an alpine boot. No use in spending a couple hundred dollars extra for a second pair of boots that is sort of irrelevant. Invest that money in a good pair of skins, probe, shovel, and beacon.


EDIT: I guess I didn't actually answer your question, yes you can do this yourself and all you need is a screwdriver.


This may be a personal preference but I have Scarpa XTs and while I think they are great as an AT boot (and relatively stiff), they are nowhere as stiff as my downhill boots. I believe it is very good "training" to ski AT boots at the resort (and I do sometimes), yet I would still want a dedicated downhill boot for most of any aggressive skiing. Most of my resort skiing is off-piste anyway, if I found a really stiff AT boot that would also tour well, I could see having only one pair. Maybe some of the newer boots you guys are referring to are that way.

Justin, you would want to buy AT boots first anyway so see for yourself whether they ski well enough and whether you want to get something stiffer down the road.
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Postby justing » Thu Feb 18, 2010 11:23 pm

Thanks for the advice folks. As usual I am now more unsure of what do than when I started. The Zzeus sounds like a potential solution though. Just need to find a place to try them on. (Life would be easier if I was a surfer instead!) How do they fit? My feet are a little on the narrow side (10 1/2 C)
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Postby Captain Beefheart » Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:07 am

Check out the Dalbello Virus boots... The future of AT boots.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dj3y-ilCI6A

BTW, you should have no problem using your alpine boots with Freerides. Although, If you have nice AT boots, why not ride them everyday so you get used to them.
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Postby Dow Williams » Fri Feb 19, 2010 3:44 am

The most important tip is to spend as much money as possible, it will make you a better skier.
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Postby nhluhr » Fri Feb 19, 2010 4:00 am

the Freerides will indeed work with both your AT and DIN boots.

The difference will be sole length and as such, you'll need to adjust the binding shorter (simple operation with a screwdriver) for use on your AT boots.

Since only the heel is going to move fore/aft though, you will be riding more forward on AT boots and more rearward on DIN boots, for a given binding mounting.

Also, keep in mind that boot sole length affects DIN release setting directly so changing your bindings to accomodate different boots might call for a DIN adjustment as well.
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Postby justing » Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:27 pm

FortMental wrote:
Dow Williams wrote:The most important tip is to spend as much money as possible, it will make you a better skier.


HA HA HA HA!

...and get duplicate gear...you'll be twice as good!


I don't get your snarky comment. I'm trying to get one setup to do it all. Lots of people on this site have a dedicated backcountry setup and a dedicated downhill setup. Why not just get some silvrettas and use your mountaineering boots at the resort? Anything more is duplication right?

From the (constructive) comments here, it seems the new AT boots can serve all purposes pretty well. I'd like to get the dynafit bindings, but I'm worried about release. Otherwise I think they would work for me at the resort. It's not like I'm skiing 50 days per year.
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Postby justing » Sat Feb 20, 2010 4:31 pm

Dow Williams wrote:The most important tip is to spend as much money as possible, it will make you a better skier.


The second most important rule is to spray as much as possible -- it makes you a better climber. :twisted:
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Postby RickF » Sat Feb 20, 2010 11:13 pm

My hunch is that A/T gear designed and built to function at a very light weight may not last as long as Alpine Downhill gear for resort skiing. A/T gear is typically about half the weight of Downhill gear. Alpine Downhill gear just seems burlier and more heavy-duty to take more repetitive poundings. This is only my hunch, I have only had my A/T gear since last year. My A/T gear skis great and my Dynafit bindings release when I need them too.

I've been resort skiing on the same gear many years. I skied my old 207 cm straight skis and Salomon bindings for about 20 years. After hundreds of days they became obsolete, but didn't really break down or wear out. I bought some new 190 cm shaped skis about 8 years ago but I'm still using my 30 year-old Lange boots for resort skiing.

When I was in my 20's and single I'd typically ski about 30 days each winter. Now I only go resort skiing 5 to 10 days a year. So If I didn't already have downhill gear I might buy only one set-up to use for both resort and backcountry.
Last edited by RickF on Sun Feb 21, 2010 8:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mtngeek » Sun Feb 21, 2010 1:16 am

justing wrote:From the (constructive) comments here, it seems the new AT boots can serve all purposes pretty well. I'd like to get the dynafit bindings, but I'm worried about release. Otherwise I think they would work for me at the resort. It's not like I'm skiing 50 days per year.


Fritschi bindings are designed to release like a downhill binding, Dynafit is not (its release is simply when you over-power the springs). However, it still does work before you start breaking bones.

In my opinion, if you are a regular at the resort and enjoy some backcountry time, the Fritschi is much more user friendly than Dynafit. I would recommend the Dynafit only if you want to spend most of your time in the backcountry and are serious about counting ounces to be more efficient. The G3 Onyx is certainly a more user friendly version of TLT, but it's heavier and the number of components makes me wonder about its reliability until it has been field tested by users for a few more seasons.

Perhaps the first thing you really need to determine for yourself is whether you will be spending more time in the resort or in the backcountry. Then perhaps the people here and in your nearest BC ski shop can help you better.
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