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top 10 of the moste dangerous mountain

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Postby xDoogiex » Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:24 am

Mt. Sunflower must be added. Not only tornados and boredom. You also have mad cows, lack of llamas for transportation, a deadly 5000+ ft elevation above sea level, dust bowl, and the risk of mad cows getting blown around in tornados. The always lurking threat of death on the north face of the beloved mt. Hell sunflower
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Postby xDoogiex » Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:26 am

I recommend Olympus Mon for #1
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Postby James_W » Sun Jul 25, 2010 2:51 am

xDoogiex wrote:Mt. Sunflower must be added. Not only tornados and boredom. You also have mad cows, lack of llamas for transportation, a deadly 5000+ ft elevation above sea level, dust bowl, and the risk of mad cows getting blown around in tornados. The always lurking threat of death on the north face of the beloved mt. Hell sunflower


Now this may just be a rumor but I heard someone is attempting a north face winter ascent with no oxygen this year.
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Postby Patrick B » Sun Jul 25, 2010 12:53 pm

The fact of the matter is that these are the top ten most publicized mountains that are known to the general public as well as climbers around the world. They are therefore thought of as dangerous because people who try and climb these aren't the pure climbers we know on this site and others and are therefore are exposed to conditions and terrain they're not used to. Hence why Mount Washington is on the list.

Some of the mountains, like Annapurna I would agree with due to the extreme avalanches and other natural hazards like seracs that it imposes.

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Postby The Chief » Sun Jul 25, 2010 3:44 pm

The MOST DANGEROUS MOUNTAIN IN THE WORLD is the one that kills you.

In most of the cases where climbers get their asses killed, it is due to climber error, lack of knowledge/experience/preparedness, over zealousness, not heeding to the warnings to turn back/retreat or just plain climber cockiness.

Everything else is simply relative.
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Postby MScholes » Sun Jul 25, 2010 5:37 pm

The Chief wrote:The MOST DANGEROUS MOUNTAIN IN THE WORLD is the one that kills you.

In most of the cases where climbers get their asses killed, it is due to climber error, lack of knowledge/experience/preparedness, over zealousness, not heeding to the warnings to turn back/retreat or just plain climber cockiness.

Everything else is simply relative.


+1

While I agree, some mountains certainly carry with them more risks then others.

Creating a list based on the # of people who've died on the mountain is not right... Everest has the most deaths of any 8000m mountain simply because it gets the most traffic... "IF" you're going to make a list (not that I would), I would put a mountain that 'kills' a higher % of the population on that mountain.
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Postby rasgoat » Sun Jul 25, 2010 6:49 pm

Yeah, Imagine the numbers if the same amount of people attempted K2 that attemp everest. I am from the east and really enjoy the mountains here which can have thier challenges. but the list is flawed.
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Postby Scott » Sun Jul 25, 2010 9:32 pm

Some of the world's most dangerous mountains:

18,000+ deaths in one day; ~4000 deaths on another day eight years previous:

http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock ... n-sur.html

23,000+ deaths in one day:

http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock ... rater.html

31,211 deaths in one day:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Pel%C3%A9e

36,417 deaths in one day:

http://www.summitpost.org/mountain/rock ... katau.html

71,000+ deaths:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Tambora

Add up all the deaths from Vesuvius and it would be up there too.
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Postby Snowslogger » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:04 am

I tried to let this thread die, but I cannot believe that Mt. Hood, "mountain of death", does not make this list. :wink: It seems to fill the headlines yearly. However, clearly not in the Mt. Sunflower league. That one is clearly one for those without wives and children. :lol:
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Postby Dow Williams » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:21 am

The Chief wrote:over zealousness, not heeding to the warnings to turn back/retreat or just plain climber cockiness.

Everything else is simply relative.


I turned back on the last move of a 7 pitch route today. Never done that, never even come close to quitting that close to finish in over a million feet of climbing. My partner was recuperating from foot surgery. I was on the sharp end all day, have been for several weeks really..... hot south facing route, knew better, but he needed to be done at a certain time. This was a route I had been on and knew. Going to be an easy day. F*****ing out of gas I tell you. At 46 I did not notice my new limits much. At 47 I do. Obviously I am beating myself up now, that is what we do, wallow in our pity. Sore, tired, burnt. I made more than 10 attempts to get over that last problem. Nothing more than a 5.10c move. Protruding bulge of limestone below had my back written all over it. Do I want to finish my summer? finish my back? (which has been badly damaged before)...got in my head...probably rightfully so....ignorance is bliss I tell you. Funny phenomena I have observed in so many climbers over time....those of us closer to deaths door than life's beginning, value what little time we have and and more particularly the condition in which we live it, more than those with much more to lose. It is a progression that resides within our psyche. It appears to own me at the moment. Anyhow, hear on the sofa, licking my self imposed egocentric wounds as though anyone could care if I finished that route or not. I am so friggin tired, never felt that empty on the wall before. Another beer it is.
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Postby Dow Williams » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:22 am

Mount Hood is actually not a dangerous mountain to climb, rather it is the folks on it who are dangerous. It really is that simple.
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Postby simonov » Mon Jul 26, 2010 2:46 am

Dow Williams wrote:I turned back on the last move of a 7 pitch route today. Never done that, never even come close to quitting that close to finish in over a million feet of climbing. My partner was recuperating from foot surgery. I was on the sharp end all day, have been for several weeks really..... hot south facing route, knew better, but he needed to be done at a certain time. This was a route I had been on and knew. Going to be an easy day. F*****ing out of gas I tell you. At 46 I did not notice my new limits much. At 47 I do. Obviously I am beating myself up now, that is what we do, wallow in our pity. Sore, tired, burnt. I made more than 10 attempts to get over that last problem. Nothing more than a 5.10c move. Protruding bulge of limestone below had my back written all over it. Do I want to finish my summer? finish my back? (which has been badly damaged before)...got in my head...probably rightfully so....ignorance is bliss I tell you. Funny phenomena I have observed in so many climbers over time....those of us closer to deaths door than life's beginning, value what little time we have and and more particularly the condition in which we live it, more than those with much more to lose. It is a progression that resides within our psyche. It appears to own me at the moment. Anyhow, hear on the sofa, licking my self imposed egocentric wounds as though anyone could care if I finished that route or not. I am so friggin tired, never felt that empty on the wall before. Another beer it is.


Is this an entry for a Faux Hemingway contest?
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Postby MoapaPk » Mon Jul 26, 2010 3:27 am

redneck wrote:Is this an entry for a Faux Hemingway contest?


NO! In the rain.
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Postby The Chief » Mon Jul 26, 2010 4:05 am

Well DOW, your wise decision today will indeed allow you to climb another day.

The "Dangerous" decision may have been to push your envelope to an extent that you may not have returned from, alive, to tell the tale that you did above.

That is the difference between a "Dangerous" and "Not Dangerous".

I believe that individuals make the environment Dangerous, not the mountain. The mountain is what it is and always will be. It is ultimately the individual's choices and decisions in the end that make the difference between the two.
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Postby John Duffield » Mon Jul 26, 2010 12:11 pm

Dow Williams wrote:
The Chief wrote:over zealousness, not heeding to the warnings to turn back/retreat or just plain climber cockiness.

Everything else is simply relative.


I turned back on the last move of a 7 pitch route today. Never done that, never even come close to quitting that close to finish in over a million feet of climbing. My partner was recuperating from foot surgery. I was on the sharp end all day, have been for several weeks really..... hot south facing route, knew better, but he needed to be done at a certain time. This was a route I had been on and knew. Going to be an easy day. F*****ing out of gas I tell you. At 46 I did not notice my new limits much. At 47 I do. Obviously I am beating myself up now, that is what we do, wallow in our pity. Sore, tired, burnt. I made more than 10 attempts to get over that last problem. Nothing more than a 5.10c move. Protruding bulge of limestone below had my back written all over it. Do I want to finish my summer? finish my back? (which has been badly damaged before)...got in my head...probably rightfully so....ignorance is bliss I tell you. Funny phenomena I have observed in so many climbers over time....those of us closer to deaths door than life's beginning, value what little time we have and and more particularly the condition in which we live it, more than those with much more to lose. It is a progression that resides within our psyche. It appears to own me at the moment. Anyhow, hear on the sofa, licking my self imposed egocentric wounds as though anyone could care if I finished that route or not. I am so friggin tired, never felt that empty on the wall before. Another beer it is.


Wow

I got goosebumps reading this. But it's true. We set our goals and our standards. Bothers us when we don't do what we set out to do. I'm beginning to think I'll actually die of old age. Not a bad thing when you have children.
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