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Gila Wilderness - NM

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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby Bubba Suess » Mon Apr 04, 2011 4:18 pm

Speaking of the Gila, this area has always intrigued me. The West and Middle Forks justifiably get all the attention but the area east of the Middle Fork looks interesting. I saw a couple pictures of this area a long time ago and I have been intrigued ever since. Just curious if anyone had been there.
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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby jfrishmanIII » Mon Apr 04, 2011 5:56 pm

I'm intrigued by that area too. I expect it would be best in spring or a dry-ish winter. Some day!
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Gila Wilderness Loop Backpack

Postby MtnHermit » Sun May 01, 2011 5:17 pm

Gila - Full Meal

Last week did the Gila Loop which was the reason for starting this thread, see map:

Image

I started at the 4WD TH on the Powerplant Road, hiked down #810 to #207, Whitewater Ck Trail, and followed it a short way to #212, S Fork Trail. The S Fork Trail crosses the creek some two-dozen times in a narrow lush canyon with lots of deadfall either in the creek or over the trail. That trail showed the most recent maintenance, with evidence of saw cuts in many downed trees. Here's a creek photo for ambiance:

Image

As was suggested in this thread, Gila miles are harder/slower than other trails, the many creek crossings with their constant up and down, coupled with the rocky trails made for slow going. However, the steep canyon was constant eye candy. The trees, mostly Douglas Fir and Ponderosa were tall and straight, easily 70-feet tall, and only 10-20 feet apart. Not at all like where I live.

I camped about a mile short of Camp Creek Saddle because I was totally gassed and the creek was down to one gallon per minute flow, the last flowing water I was to see until the next afternoon. Also, unlike my Colo backpacks, the temperature doesn't fall off a cliff at sunset, rather declines steadily all night long. Got to 32°F that first night, saw an ice covered puddle the next morning.

When I reached Camp Creek Saddle the next morning that was the end of the trail maintenance and the end of a visible trail. The Holt-Apache Trail, #810, hadn't seen a saw blade is ten+ years. The recent burn north of Camp Creek Saddle made sight navigation easy, just needed to avoid the deadfall tangle. I headed for an obvious saddle and lo-and-behold picked up the trail well off from its map location. In that quest I ran into a 10-foot variant of Crucifixion Thorn, looked just like an aspen until you had a half-inch thorn embedded in your palm. Didn't make that mistake twice.

The Crucifixion Thorn was everywhere in the Gila, mostly 3-5 foot tall and most plentiful in that burn area above 8000 feet. Nothing like the combination of a thorn grove and a deadfall tweener to strike fear into a backpacker. By the time I got out of the burn area I had torn pants, bloody knuckles, and numerous scratches on my arms and legs. The same burn area was covered in raspberry brush, never thought I ever ignore raspberry, but Crucifixion Thorn will demand your undivided attention.

Shortly after the burn area, I needed a physical and mental break and stopped at a rare opening in the trees for this view of Black Mtn, 10,600', east of Spider Creek. There were a few snow patches visible near the summit. I saw no snow on my loop and I topped out at 9400 feet.

Image

After my rest it was a relatively short hike to Spider Saddle and the DeLoche Trail, #179, into Winn Canyon. #179 was by far the best trail, with little deadfall, almost no rocks and may switchbacks to ease the grade. I camped as soon as I reached Whitewater Creek, I'd run out of water on the way down the 2600' descent. Just a few hundred yards down #207 from my camp, I encountered a large group of backpackers going from the Willow Creek gate on Hwy 159 to the Catwalk TH. Talked to a couple and they counted the number of crossings, 36, of Whitewater Creek. Here's an example:

Image

So my Gila "meal" was 19-miles and a bit over 5000' of elevation gain. Never been anyplace quite like the Gila. That's why I go.

Edit 1: Oh I should mention, driving toward Glenwood on US 180 & NM 12, saw a couple of anti-wolf billboards. Basically, wolves eat elk and the locals would rather shoot elk or sell supplies to others who come to hunt NM elk. I heard turkeys twice and saw one flying. Otherwise just elk and deer prints on the trail.
Last edited by MtnHermit on Sun May 01, 2011 8:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gila Wilderness Loop Backpack

Postby Clark_Griswold » Sun May 01, 2011 6:45 pm

MtnHermit wrote: Never been anyplace quite like the Gila. That's why I go.
If you get the chance, consider crossing McKenna Park in the central part of the Gila. It's one of the few areas of the west with virgin ponderosa pines and after decades of fire exclusion, the FS has recently "allowed" a few fires to penetrate that area. Unfortunately, they suppressed a lightning fire in that area last spring, but it's still a really nice location.
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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby Clark_Griswold » Tue May 10, 2011 5:26 pm

http://inciweb.org/incident/2207/

FYI, the exceptional drought in the SW has started a slightly earlier than normal and very active fire season this year. The Miller Fire in the Gila Wilderness may affect plans. Some trails are currently closed. Best to contact the forest for details about a trip.
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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby Clark_Griswold » Sat Jun 02, 2012 4:43 am

http://inciweb.org/incident/2870/

Anyone following this complex? Lightning caused, and while a few days saw explosive growth through long since fire excluded stands, the recent growth over the last 5 days has been more backing, flanking and slower heading, and often through some fairly high fire frequency stands of pure pine and mixed conifers. Good news for people who love wilderness and fire maintained ecosystems, not to mention the Gila itself. It's southeastern edge is running into last year's Miller Fire. Hopefully, the entirety of McKenna Park as well as Woodland Park burn. McKenna could really stand to return to a < 10 year fire cycle of low to moderate intensity. For being faily high and moist, it is still pure ponderosa with only scattered oak, and mixed conifer near the canyons and Diablo Range.
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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby jfrishmanIII » Sat Jun 02, 2012 2:13 pm

Yeah, I've been following it, had hoped to be heading down there soon, but I'm not surprised given the lousy spring we had around here. I hope you're right Lionel, and I'm sure that this will benefit a lot of forest, especially the ponderosa parks. I just hope it's not too hard on the riparian areas. This one blew so big and fast, it's not exactly low to moderate intensity.
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Re: Gila Wilderness - NM

Postby Clark_Griswold » Sat Jun 02, 2012 3:46 pm

I guess in the Upper Rio Grande basin, it's been hard not to follow the fire, or know about it. The parks will be improved and refreshed, unless they went a log time without fire. The denser mixed conifer forests and areas that haven't burned in decades, or many decades, are probably destroyed. The fire was a lot like the June 2006 Bear fire that was wind blown and grew 50 to 60000 aces in one day. They would be better off if they just let things burn in the wilderness, but they still want to play god.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/gilaforest/7318196816/in/photostreamThis is probably on a road, not in the wilderness interior, but they have used this in the interior, as in last year's Miller Fire. I would love to know what part of the Wilderness Ethos of: "A wilderness, in contrast with those areas where man and his own works dominate the landscape, is hereby recognized as an area where the earth and community of life are untrammeled by man, where man himself is a visitor who does not remain.”, a giant airplane dumping chemicals onto the land fits into. Bicycle=bad, airplane with chemicals=good.
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