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training on the east coast for alpine climbs

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training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby skyward22 » Sun Jun 12, 2011 11:50 pm

So I moved back from Colorado to North Carolina last summer for a 2 year grad program. I'm going to Peru at the end of the summer but am worried that I won't be able to train for the types of climbs I want to do in the Cordillera Blanca b/c I don't have access to the same mountains--so no long, 22 hour days at altitude, carrying a pack over uneven terrain, fighting the cold, front-pointing up steep snow, etc. I've been getting out to the AT with a pack on to do some 20+ mile days on the hardest sections of the AT I can find to try and simulate long days, and also doing a shit-load of stairs with a pack on. But how ready can I get? Would be interested in hearing how people in my area or in similar situations got ready for the likes of Artesonraju, Alpamayo, Huascaran, etc all while living in the flat-lands....
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby psycobill » Mon Jun 13, 2011 3:07 am

Never got ready for those climbs but me and my buddy were planning on doing this training trip in Linville Gorge that we were calling "The Retarded Traverse". Basically going and linking up a bunch of moderate routes on 3 big cliffs out there. Was something like 13+ miles on foot w/ 4500' gain, 9 routes, 35 guidebook pitches & 3300'+ of technical climbing to 5.7. Sad to say business & family matters has stopped us from making it out there to do it. So you can understand the name, we just wanted to crush ourselves retardedly... I'm sure that would be good training!
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby bird » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:02 pm

There's plenty of other threads with a similar theme. Keep doing what you are doing and check out www.mtnathlete.com.
They'll make you "harder to kill" ;-)
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby albanberg » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:13 pm

Sounds like you are doing some serious workouts. Just give yourself some time when you get down there to acclimatize. I know I need more at ~15,000ft or so to do better higher up, so next time I go I'll do some laid back camping at that altitude for 3 to 4 days before trying something at 6000 meters or higher.

Strength/conditioning is one thing but the altitude is another.
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby psycobill » Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:43 am

Lol bird... I should've be doing some Mtn athlete WO's. My lower back today could use some of that "harder to kill"!
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby bird » Tue Jun 14, 2011 4:51 pm

psycobill wrote:Lol bird... I should've be doing some Mtn athlete WO's. My lower back today could use some of that "harder to kill"!

You need more deadlifts! :D
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby wkriesel » Tue Jun 14, 2011 6:44 pm

Sounds like you are doing the right stuff. The AT is great training that helped me on Aconcagua. Might also suggest doing long ascents with a heavy pack. Mt Sterling and Mitchell both have 4,000' ascents from the trailhead. If you can do that in under 4 hours, you're in shape. Regarding altitude, I think its right when they say its more genetics than preparation.
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby Sierra Ledge Rat » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:07 pm

tobe945 wrote:I've been getting out to the AT with a pack on to do some 20+ mile days on the hardest sections of the AT I can find to try and simulate long days, and also doing a shit-load of stairs with a pack on...


Keep doing what you're doing.
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Re: training on the east coast for alpine climbs

Postby EverydayExplorer » Wed Jun 29, 2011 3:02 pm

When I was in Charlotte, NC I did a shit load of stairs and took the 30 minute drive to Crowder's to get a bit of uneven terrain to hike up. This was training for Rainier so nothing really high altitude but it got me in shape. Surprisingly the best training was also the most fun. I think the best training was climbing at Linville Gorge and at Laurel Knob. psychobill's retard traverse sounds like something I would unintentionally do back in the day. Just to get into Linville Gorge you've got a healthy scramble with a trad rack and ropes.

When I was in NC the CCC had just bought access rights to Laurel Knob and there had been minimal i.e. no trail development. My buddy and I epic'd back there and having a 2 hour uphill hike out after a 18 hour day is brutal. It builds character for sure.
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