Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

Nepal Trekking

Regional discussion and conditions reports for Asia. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the Asia Climbing Partners section.
 

Nepal Trekking

Postby photo61guy » Fri Dec 02, 2011 6:28 am

Looking at a trek and a little climbing in Nepal in about a year. Plan to be gone close to a month. Just was wondering what anyone's thoughts are concerning going with an American company or a local Nepalese company...obviously the latter is a bit cheaper. That being said.....what say you?
photo61guy

 
Posts: 94
Joined: Sun Dec 07, 2003 12:29 am
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby dmiki » Fri Dec 02, 2011 11:59 am

Hi,

Have you checked the earlier similar threads in the forums?

bye
Michael
User Avatar
dmiki

 
Posts: 248
Joined: Tue Aug 24, 2004 5:54 am
Location: Budapest, Hungary
Thanked: 17 times in 13 posts

The following user would like to thank dmiki for this post
photo61guy

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby skigirl918 » Mon Dec 12, 2011 1:31 am

Hi,
I just got back from spending 2 months in Nepal (still feeling nostalgic, which is why I have so much motivation to reply to this topic!). I spent 36 days trekking and climbing in the Everest area (Island Peak and Lobuche Peak climbs and over Cho La pass), then I went on a trek to Annapurna Base Camp (10 days) and then a 5-day trek in Langtang National Park (started in Dhunche and hiked up to Tserko Ri). I first organized my trek/climbs in the Everest area before coming to Nepal through Unique Adventure Intl. (http://www.uniquetreks.com/), they provided me a very good guide with lots of experience, and I ended up hiring him after our first month to accompany me on the last two treks. His name is Lakpa Sherpa and I can provide his contact info if you want it (as of right now he has no reservations for next year's trekking season). It is cheapest to simply hire a guide/porter directly (not through a company), more expensive to go through a company (like Unique Adv.), although they do organize everything for you which is nice if you've never been to Nepal before, and most expensive to go through an American based company. There are lots of well-regarded companies that are based in Nepal (like Unique Adv.) and the advantages of going through one instead of an American based one is that your money benefits Nepalis and the Nepal economy directly, and as mentioned before it is also cheaper. I was a solo female traveling alone and felt very safe and had an amazing experience with the company and guide I used. If you have only one month in Nepal I would recommend spending time in the Everest area to climb/trek, since I was most impressed with the mountains there compared to the Annapurna and Langtang regions. But everywhere was amazing, so you can't go wrong!
skigirl918

 
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2011 5:24 am
Location: evergreen, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

The following user would like to thank skigirl918 for this post
photo61guy

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby Scott » Mon Dec 12, 2011 2:10 am

For trekking in the popular areas (Everest, Annapurna, Langtang), it's pretty pointless to have a guide. A much better option is a porter-guide(s), guidebook and a map. It's much better, safer and more enjoyable to set your own itenerary.

If you are climbing "easy" peaks, then a Nepali guide service would usually be recommended and more ethical (keeps more money local). Spending locally is pretty important, IMHO.

If you are doing something technical (Ama Dablam or an 8000 meter peak for example), then a western guide service may be the way to go.

If you are going to the popular trekking areas, the following books describe about every step of the way on the main routes:

http://www.amazon.com/Trekking-Everest- ... 559&sr=1-1

http://www.amazon.com/Trekking-Annapurn ... 589&sr=1-2

http://www.amazon.com/Trekking-Langtang ... 680&sr=1-1

They also cover many routes and side trips well off the beaten track. It's pretty hard to get lost, even off the beaten track using a map/book and even if you did, your porter (porter-guide) will know where to go or will at the very least be able to ask. On the main routes, it's almost impossible to get lost.
User Avatar
Scott

 
Posts: 7478
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2003 1:03 pm
Location: Craig, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 604 times in 325 posts

The following user would like to thank Scott for this post
Cy Kaicener, photo61guy

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby Cy Kaicener » Wed Jan 11, 2012 4:33 pm

Here is a video of trekking the Great Himalaya Trail
http://theadventureblog.blogspot.com/20 ... il-in.html
User Avatar
Cy Kaicener

 
Posts: 6214
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2004 10:59 pm
Location: Rialto, California, United States
Thanked: 238 times in 217 posts

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby geeyore » Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:54 pm

For trekking to Everest, Gokyo, or Annapurna Sanctuary/Circuit you don't really need a guide or a porter. You can certainly do so if you want to help the local economy, but keep in mind that you will be the "manager" of your temporary employees. I've done it with and without, and without is better. Hiring climbing guides is quite a different matter and others have said it already.
User Avatar
geeyore

 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:32 pm
Location: Virginia, United States
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby Scott » Fri Feb 17, 2012 3:33 am

I've done it with and without, and without is better.


I would have to respectfully disagree. While a guide is certainly not needed, I would recommend a porter. Last time we were in Nepal my wife was five months pregnant and we did a 350 km/216 mile trek. Since she was pregnant we had to get her a porter. I opted to carry my own pack even though I could have easily gotten another porter. Although I'm certainly capable of carrying my own pack (and did so for the entire trek), it didn't take into the trek before I was wondering what I was thinking turning down another porter. Hiring one helps the local economy and is well worth the small cost by western standards ($5 a day when we were there, currently $6-9 a day).

I'm headed back to Nepal later this year and will certainly hire a porter this time.
User Avatar
Scott

 
Posts: 7478
Joined: Thu Aug 21, 2003 1:03 pm
Location: Craig, Colorado, United States
Thanked: 604 times in 325 posts

Re: Nepal Trekking

Postby geeyore » Sun Feb 19, 2012 2:06 pm

Scott wrote:
I've done it with and without, and without is better.


Last time we were in Nepal my wife was five months pregnant and we did a 350 km/216 mile trek... I'm headed back to Nepal later this year and will certainly hire a porter this time.

If I was with my pregnant wife I would most certainly hire a porter and understand why you did so.

Yet for the Everest/Gokyo treks (whether from Jiri or from Lukla. I've done both routes twice) it is basically a simple teahouse to teahouse walk, albeit sometimes strenuous, yet also quite busy with trekkers and locals during the trekking season of October/November.

I can safely say that there will never be any problem whatsoever in trying it without a guide or porter, and changing one's mind if needed at almost any point along the route.

Especially in Lukla, Namche, or Tengboche I would assert that one could hire assistance in one hour or probably less with zero difficulty.
User Avatar
geeyore

 
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2011 9:32 pm
Location: Virginia, United States
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts


Return to Asia

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2013 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.