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Fort Ord becomes National Monument

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Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby ScottHanson » Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:23 am

Jeez, I am out of the loop. I didn't realize Fort Ord was closed in 1994. The article I read sounds like half of the 14,000 acres is off limits to clean up ordinance, while BLM runs the other half. Curious if any folks here have hiked over stretches of this area. An peak bagging opportunities? Or is it mainly sand dunes next to the ocean? I was under the impression a National Monument was "smaller" than a National Park, but I should probably re-read the definition of a National Monument and what makes of piece of land unique to qualify for this status.
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Re: Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby simonov » Mon Apr 23, 2012 6:34 pm

ScottHanson wrote:Curious if any folks here have hiked over stretches of this area.


I bet anyone who did their Basic class at Fort Ord (like my brother) has hiked over stretches of this area.
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Re: Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby Bob Sihler » Mon Apr 23, 2012 7:45 pm

ScottHanson wrote:I was under the impression a National Monument was "smaller" than a National Park, but I should probably re-read the definition of a National Monument and what makes of piece of land unique to qualify for this status.
Scott


Park vs. Monument

According to the source, size does not play a role. However, national monuments do tend to be smaller, though Grand Staircase-Escalante is an example of one much larger than many national parks.

A key difference is how they're established. Congress has to make a national park, but a president can declare a national monument under the Antiquities Act.
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Re: Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby coldfoot » Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:01 pm

Fort Ord has been closed for quite a while and people have been using the land (the parts that are not restricted) for recreation. When I lived in the area a few years ago there was some uncertainty about which areas might get sold off for development. We used to run some MTB races up in the northern part. I think the area under designation is NW of highway 68, and that's an area of rolling hills and shrubs to small trees. No peaks, not much in the way of sand dunes. There is a large road/trail network through the former fort area which is one of the attractions for users. Unf., I also found it to be a good place for bagging poison oak.
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Re: Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby Augie Medina » Mon Apr 23, 2012 9:07 pm

Part of this former Army post is now Calif State University at Monterrey.

I did basic training at Ft. Ord. Spent most of the time on the firing ranges which were on the beach. I remember rolling hills in the open areas. That was essentially my first experience "camping" in the great outdoors. But let me tell you camping in the military is a far cry from the way you do it in civilian life-lol. Least-wise, I've never gone back-packing where someone continually posts guard duty during the night!

Sure glad to see the government has given this area some permanent protection from development.
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Re: Fort Ord becomes National Monument

Postby ScottHanson » Tue Apr 24, 2012 3:33 am

I get why Devils Postpile near Mammoth Lakes is a National Monument with its columnar basalt formation, but I wasn't aware of a scientific reason for Fort Ord becoming a National Monument. Thanks for the definitional difference between a National Park versus National Monument Bob Sihler. Maybe it is a National Monument for historic reasons because a fort existed there for 80 years? I didn't train at Fort Ord; I was a Fort Lewis, Fort Sam Houston, and Fort Lee guy. I faintly remember a few of my high school and college friends ended up at Fort Ord. This is back in the days of the draft lottery (I was #61, ha) and the end of the Vietnam era.
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