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Dog Rescue - Mt. Bierstadt Area

Regional discussion and conditions reports for the U.S. Rocky Mountains. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the Colorado Climbing Partners section.
 

Re: Dog Rescue - Mt. Bierstadt Area

Postby lcarreau » Sat Aug 18, 2012 2:18 pm

This news release states that Missy weighed 112 # ..

http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory/man-charged-abandoning-dog-colo-mountain-17030701#.UDDmj6CQl_Y

Just another case where people don't want to take personal responsibility for something that (once) belonged to them. Sad ..
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Re: Dog Rescue - Mt. Bierstadt Area

Postby jcsesica » Sun Aug 19, 2012 7:14 pm

FWIW, on a day hike into Loch Leven Lakes above the Yuba Gap a few years ago I ran in to a guy on the way out whose Rottweiler had thrown in the towel and laid down on the trail, refusing to move any further. Apparently his paws just weren't used to the rocky trail. The dog had been sitting there for over an hour. I tried to pick him up but he growled and bared his teeth at each attempt. I eventually left him and reported it to the ranger station near the trailhead. The ranger didn't seem very sympathetic, who could blame him-he said this happens all too often every summer-and said that he would see if anyone was available for rescue. However, he said they didn't usually do anything.

I run my lab daily 1-2 miles on a gravel road to condition his paws and have never had a problem, even on hikes as long as 15-20 miles. You can't take a city dwelling pooch on a big hike and expect them to be trouble-free. It's common sense.
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Re: Dog Rescue - Mt. Bierstadt Area

Postby SeanReedy » Sun Aug 19, 2012 10:28 pm

I once saw a guy from Oakland put himself and his St. Bernard in a tough situation on the Lost Coast Trail. Fortunately they made it out with nothing more than some encouraging words, the minimal peace of mind of a borrowed cell phone, and some good decisions. They rested overnight, cut their trip short, and detoured to smoother terrain. Barring a properly equipped team to carry it, a St. Bernard that won't budge might as well be an elephant. Meanwhile, my lab happily made it through the Lost Coast trip with enthusiasm leftover to go peakbagging on the way home. Rangers mention that many dogs paws have suffered there.

jcsesica wrote:...he said this happens all too often every summer...he said they didn't usually do anything.

^^^It will continue to happen, but it can't hurt to keep putting the word out.

jcsesica wrote:I run my lab daily 1-2 miles on a gravel road to condition his paws and have never had a problem, even on hikes as long as 15-20 miles.

^^^That's a great tip to pass along. My dogs do well on hikes in the 20 mile range with rough, rocky sections, as long as I have been getting them out regularly beforehand on rougher surfaces than grass, smooth sidewalks, and soft dirt. The harsher the terrain will be on the hike, the more conditioning is needed going in (if rough conditions aren't part of a daily routine). I find that the dogs' paws usually need a rest day/easy day after long hikes in rough terrain, especially if scrambling was involved. Steep downhill, scrambling, and/or trails with long, rocky sections are best avoided if I suspect paws will be/are already sore. Sometimes, more than one day in easier terrain is needed after a tough outing. Multiple days in a row of moderate distances (+/-10 miles) without much rough terrain or scrambling has never been a problem with mine, but I have rarely let them become significantly unconditioned. My dogs don't like booties, have torn some up quickly if I managed to keep them on, and climb better without them. Most of the same things that help a hike go well for humans apply to dogs with foot and heat considerations amplified. The signs and communication of potential problems are usually there if one is reading the language.
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Dog Rescue - Final Chapter?

Postby MtnHermit » Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:35 pm

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Re: Dog Rescue - Mt. Bierstadt Area

Postby Cy Kaicener » Mon Sep 17, 2012 10:33 pm

Thats good news. Here is another link
http://gma.yahoo.com/colorado-hiker-aba ... ories.html
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