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Hang board advice for a novice?

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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Tue Oct 09, 2012 2:32 pm

CClaude wrote:I propose that unless you are looking to climb 5.13 sport or upper 5.13 trad or harder, there is no reason to use a hangboard. The only reason that I use them this summer and fall is I missed most of the summer with knee surgery and am looking on getting back onto "Learning to Fly" to train for Zion.

At this stage of the game, get out and work on technique. Technique will get you the farthest at this point.

Excessive weight isn't good ince it will put extra stress on tendons. A healthy diet and working out, and just getting out climbing will do wonders with this.

Don't get injuried! Allow yourself to progress at a reasonable rate, allowing the tendons and ligaments to accomadate he new stresses. Don't climb hard everyday. Take rest days!

On top of the excers izes that rick recommended, work on both internal and external rotator cuff excersizes. Google Aimee Roseborrough and stonewear designs. She had a vide o of the excersizes on one of there Friday afternoon tips. She gives some advise about training for climbing from the perspective of a physical therapist who is also a 5.13 sports climber ( also a reasonable trad climber, Iknow this since she used to be my neighbor)



CC,
Thanks! I will give Roseborrough a look-see.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby CClaude » Tue Oct 09, 2012 4:22 pm

Here is the link to Aimee's Five Tips on Friday. There is a video link to some stability excersizes in the link.

http://www.livestonewear.com/2012/09/20 ... ing-goals/
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby Kahuna » Tue Oct 09, 2012 5:25 pm

BTW there TIm...

Implementing a good daily STRETCHING ROUTINE will do wonders for your climbing.

Guaranteed!!!

Here are some good sources:

http://suite101.com/article/stretches-f ... ch-a139179

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climbing-flexibility.asp

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climb10e.asp
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Tue Oct 09, 2012 6:26 pm

A5RP wrote:BTW there TIm...

Implementing a good daily STRETCHING ROUTINE will do wonders for your climbing.

Guaranteed!!!

Here are some good sources:

http://suite101.com/article/stretches-f ... ch-a139179

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climbing-flexibility.asp

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climb10e.asp



Thank you, Rick! My instructor and I were talking about the same yesterday after our climb. He thinks I ought to look into a yoga class, also. Thinks it would do my climbing a lot of good.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby Vitaliy M. » Tue Oct 09, 2012 9:08 pm

TimB wrote:
A5RP wrote:BTW there TIm...

Implementing a good daily STRETCHING ROUTINE will do wonders for your climbing.

Guaranteed!!!

Here are some good sources:

http://suite101.com/article/stretches-f ... ch-a139179

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climbing-flexibility.asp

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climb10e.asp



Thank you, Rick! My instructor and I were talking about the same yesterday after our climb. He thinks I ought to look into a yoga class, also. Thinks it would do my climbing a lot of good.


Being flexible and learning how to breath properly is very beneficial for climbing. Just don't focus so much on getting better purely for technical climbing. And don't over do it at this point to avoid injuries. I used to climb in the gym every day and after about 6 month of doing that I did not see any gain in strength since I did not let my body rest, and was overworking myself with cardio, gym climbing and climbs on the weekend at the same time. Doing less sometimes provides more results. But make sure when you DO your work outs, they are intense and goal oriented. Workouts to improve climbing should focus on climbing.
My advice would be to get out and follow/lead climbs that are within your abilities (maybe you can tell us what that is now?), get comfortable there, and come up with a list of climbs at that level that excite you. A good way to improve (from own experience) is to also pick a climb a few grades higher than you could do at this point. Something that scares you and excites you equally. A beautiful line or a scary one, one that YOU desire to get on. And work towards obtaining skills to do that climb. For example, if it is a finger crack or a hand crack you work on your crack climbing skills more etc to work up to it. This way you are not just working on grades, but towards a climbing trip, improving technique, and have a sweet climb waiting for you. It is a great feeling completing a climb you wanted to do for a while. If you plan a climb in Sierra you can pick a few climbs that you KNOW you can do (that also excite you), and than one or more that would challenge you big time. At this point pick well protected climbs where in worst case you can pull through on gear.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby CClaude » Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:59 am

As for yoga, look for a good instructor. From what I see too many instructors stress flexibility verging on hyper-flexibility. While this may sound good ( and is certainly a fad nowadays), what they should be stressing joint stability. Instability in joints will translate to injuries.

Another article to checkout hangboard training is Rock and Ice, December 2012. ( just out). Neill Grimes discusses it, and recommends until you are climbing V7+ (5.13b'ish) only hangboard with your feet on holds, ( see chart on page 74).
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Wed Oct 10, 2012 4:31 pm

Vitaliy M. wrote:
TimB wrote:
A5RP wrote:BTW there TIm...

Implementing a good daily STRETCHING ROUTINE will do wonders for your climbing.

Guaranteed!!!

Here are some good sources:

http://suite101.com/article/stretches-f ... ch-a139179

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climbing-flexibility.asp

http://www.bodyresults.com/s2climb10e.asp



Thank you, Rick! My instructor and I were talking about the same yesterday after our climb. He thinks I ought to look into a yoga class, also. Thinks it would do my climbing a lot of good.


Being flexible and learning how to breath properly is very beneficial for climbing. Just don't focus so much on getting better purely for technical climbing. And don't over do it at this point to avoid injuries. I used to climb in the gym every day and after about 6 month of doing that I did not see any gain in strength since I did not let my body rest, and was overworking myself with cardio, gym climbing and climbs on the weekend at the same time. Doing less sometimes provides more results. But make sure when you DO your work outs, they are intense and goal oriented. Workouts to improve climbing should focus on climbing.
My advice would be to get out and follow/lead climbs that are within your abilities (maybe you can tell us what that is now?), get comfortable there, and come up with a list of climbs at that level that excite you. A good way to improve (from own experience) is to also pick a climb a few grades higher than you could do at this point. Something that scares you and excites you equally. A beautiful line or a scary one, one that YOU desire to get on. And work towards obtaining skills to do that climb. For example, if it is a finger crack or a hand crack you work on your crack climbing skills more etc to work up to it. This way you are not just working on grades, but towards a climbing trip, improving technique, and have a sweet climb waiting for you. It is a great feeling completing a climb you wanted to do for a while. If you plan a climb in Sierra you can pick a few climbs that you KNOW you can do (that also excite you), and than one or more that would challenge you big time. At this point pick well protected climbs where in worst case you can pull through on gear.


Vitalily,
I appreciate the advice!

I am working out 4-5 days a week, mostly trail running, some weights, and other cardio(Nordic track) along with the climbing. I need to incorporate some stretching into my workouts, as my flexibility needs work. However, I don't seem to get overly sore from climbing?
As far as my ability goes, I am a pretty steady 5.8 on top rope or when following a multi-pitch trad climb. I still have a few 'hang-ups' with smearing and over gripping when I get a bit tired.
It seems like so far that I enjoy the trad climbing more than sport as I like the idea of learning where and how to place protection and sort of thing. I am hoping to get into alpine climbing, though I have only done one climb of that sort(in the Tetons) so far.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Wed Oct 10, 2012 4:36 pm

CClaude wrote:As for yoga, look for a good instructor. From what I see too many instructors stress flexibility verging on hyper-flexibility. While this may sound good ( and is certainly a fad nowadays), what they should be stressing joint stability. Instability in joints will translate to injuries.

Another article to checkout hangboard training is Rock and Ice, December 2012. ( just out). Neill Grimes discusses it, and recommends until you are climbing V7+ (5.13b'ish) only hangboard with your feet on holds, ( see chart on page 74).


5.13?! Wow, I might not ever need a hangboard at that rate! ;)

Where I live(rural Idaho) I don't have a lot of choices as far as yoga. In fact, we don't have a single climbing gym here in Twin Falls.
However, I am trying to round up some partners to climb in one of the Boise area gyms over the winter and I think I found a yoga class at the local YMCA that might work.


I sure appreciate all the helpful posts from the folks here at SP. This is a great site that I am happy to be a part of.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby CClaude » Thu Oct 11, 2012 1:37 am

You may not have a lot of choices in Yoga, but when the weather is good, City of Rocks and Castle Rock State Park are is very good place to learn trad climbing. There is a wide range of climbs atmoderate grades that are well protected, ( but be careful since some of them are slabby at the bottom or top)

As for not ever needing to, don't sell yourself short..... You may surprise yourselfin what you can do in the future....
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby Vitaliy M. » Thu Oct 11, 2012 3:29 am

http://www.summitpost.org/training-spec ... ing/287439

Great article by a friend of yours...not sure why he didn't post it.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Thu Oct 11, 2012 5:11 pm

CClaude wrote:You may not have a lot of choices in Yoga, but when the weather is good, City of Rocks and Castle Rock State Park are is very good place to learn trad climbing. There is a wide range of climbs atmoderate grades that are well protected, ( but be careful since some of them are slabby at the bottom or top)

As for not ever needing to, don't sell yourself short..... You may surprise yourselfin what you can do in the future....


City of Rocks and Castle Rock are where I have been taking lessons. A great place, IMO.

And, CC, I appreciate the encouragement!
8)
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby TimB » Thu Oct 11, 2012 5:20 pm

Vitaliy M. wrote:http://www.summitpost.org/training-specific-for-climbing/287439

Great article by a friend of yours...not sure why he didn't post it.


That looks like it is worth reading, for certain.

Thanks for posting, Vitaliy!
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby pvnisher » Sun Oct 14, 2012 2:57 pm

That is a good post on workouts for climbing.

I know I'm wading into a swamp here, but I have a different opinion than most do regarding the hangboard. And yes, I recognize that some very experienced and knowledgeable folks said not to use it. Here's my story, ymmv.

I was given one by a friend, and immediately jumped onto it. After 2 days of working on it my fingers were hurting pretty good, and it hurt to make a fist. Yes, I clearly overdid it.
I did some research (should have done that first!) and realized I'm lucky to have not injured myself.

So I rested for about 2 weeks, and then my fingers were fine.

I eased into it very easily. I did this by hanging only on the big round sloper for about 10 seconds at a time, each time I'd go into the garage. 1-2x a day. Nothing more. I chose sloper since it seemed like it put the least stress on my finger tendons.
After a week I started hanging for 15 seconds, then 20, etc. Only on the round sloper.
After a month or so I started incorporating the jugs into pullup workouts (which I do as part of general fitness, not just for climbing).
So now, after about 8 months with it, here's what I do:
-every time I go into the garage I hang on the slopers for about 25 seconds
-I use the jugs and slopers for pullups with workouts, and for doing leg raises, etc
-I use the 3-finger pocket for hanging, 10-15 secs
-some hanging or half-pulls with a good hold and a medium hold
-about once a week do the 10 minute Metolius workout, substituting larger holds instead of the small edges
-No crimping or small holds, ever

I have found that it has helped me to be stronger (or have more endurance). Unfortunately I only get out to go vertical climbing infrequently. At that infrequent rate, my strength would never improve simply by climbing. So using the hangboard has been invaluable.

Will technique and practice help much more than simply strength? Absolutely. My footwork is still atrocious and my balance poor! Hangboard won't help that.

But being stronger means that if I could do X routes on my infrequent climbing day, now I can do X+3 routes, which means I get more practice, and get to focus on technique more.
And that's where I see the value of it, as long as you're careful and ease into its use.
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Re: Hang board advice for a novice?

Postby Kahuna » Sun Oct 14, 2012 3:16 pm

Here is some more good stretching workout beta from DMM:

http://dmmclimbing.com/knowledge/alex-s ... -climbing/


I am a firm believer in first thing in the morning stretching/light strengthening workouts ending in a brief but moderately heart rate raising cardio stinch. Gets you going and as Alex notes in the above video, prevents minor injuries that can ultimately result in a longer more pronounced aggravating injury such as tendonitis.




Here is Eric Horst's awesome site that contains tons of training beta and refs for all climbers.
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