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Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby whatdoIknow » Wed Jan 02, 2013 1:14 pm

Both countries are fantastic, but as far as the mountains go I would say you cannot top the Blanca.

I'd add one more vote for skyline in Huaraz.
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Luciano136 » Fri Jan 04, 2013 5:59 pm

With Peruvian Andes, we indeed had 3 people on the rope. One guide and two clients. In my case, it was my wife and I on the rope, so I felt pretty comfortable with that.
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Scott » Sat Jan 05, 2013 12:32 am

I've seen some guides in the Alps and on Rainier put 6-7 people on one rope, with just a few feet between people, and pretty much drag them up and down the mountain caterpillar-style... Do they do the same in the Andes?


It depends on the guide service/mountain, but on Cotopaxi I seriously saw about a dozen people on one rope!
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Damien Gildea » Sat Jan 05, 2013 1:06 am

Scott wrote:... on Cotopaxi I seriously saw about a dozen people on one rope!


And this, in a country that has just made it compulsory to use a guide when going over 5000m. Terrifying.
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby mtvalley » Tue Jan 08, 2013 6:37 am

Given a choice between Huayna Potosi + Illimani, or Vallunaraju + Huascaran, which would the South American veterans here choose?

I like the idea of expedition climbing on Huascaran but the normal route is apparently in dangerous condition the last year or so? Then again I've heard about a sometimes impassable bergschrund on Illimani. Which is the better option for moderate but interesting climbs with a reasonable chance of success?
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Damien Gildea » Tue Jan 08, 2013 8:12 am

extra day in LaPaz + Huayna Potosi + Sajama
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Woodie Hopper » Tue Jan 08, 2013 11:58 am

Damien Gildea wrote:extra day in LaPaz + Huayna Potosi + Sajama


Nice way to see two very different areas with high peaks that don't have much (or any) technical difficulty on their standard routes.

I'm not sure I understand what is meant about the "sometimes impassable bergschrund" on Illimani. Standard route seemed pretty straightforward to me.

Woodie
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Andes6000 » Thu Jan 17, 2013 2:13 pm

Buyer beware. Many if not most of the climbing accidents in this country stem from "guides" who are not certified and companies that will say anything to make a quick buck. These companies will take anyone virtually anywhere, as often happens to backpackers searching for adventure. So always ask for proof of certification, and in my opinion if it's not a UIAGM trained guide it's not worth it and only a handful exist. I would recommend testing the guide on Huayna Potosi or some other acclimation climb before paying in advance for other mountains. Having said all that, this is an amazing country and most climbers with international experience know these things apply almost everywhere.
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby Andes6000 » Thu Jan 17, 2013 2:43 pm

Here you will find a list of all Bolivian guides and certifications, under Guias y Aspirantes. I can recommend Gonzalo Jaimes Rodriguez who is very competent on rock and ice and is director of the mountain school.

www.agmtb.org
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Re: Climbing guides in Peru and Bolivia

Postby rgg » Fri Jan 18, 2013 3:50 pm

mtvalley wrote:Given a choice between Huayna Potosi + Illimani, or Vallunaraju + Huascaran, which would the South American veterans here choose?

I like the idea of expedition climbing on Huascaran but the normal route is apparently in dangerous condition the last year or so? Then again I've heard about a sometimes impassable bergschrund on Illimani. Which is the better option for moderate but interesting climbs with a reasonable chance of success?


Huayna Potosi and Vallunaraju are both peaks that can be climbed without experience. Success rates are high on both. Which one you'll enjoy most I find hard to say; I enjoyed both climbs, didn't have a view on Huayna Potosi though.

I found Illimani a lot easier than Huascarán, and I would be very surprised if the success rate for Illimani wasn't a lot higher too. Many people don't reach the summit of Huascarán Sur on their first try. I needed two attempts myself, but then I enjoyed climbing Huascarán a whole lot more.

Bolivia was in September 2009. We had no problems with a bergschrund anywhere. I found it a very fine climb, and overall pretty easy, actually.
Huascarán Sur was in August 2011. The route in the icefall is always dangerous; there are many crevasses and you have to pass two dangerous avalanche zones. But it wasn't technically difficult. The crux was higher up: a steep section just below 6300m. Another potential problem: if there is no route above Garganta, finding a way up in darkness can be difficult, unless you have someone with you who has been up there earlier in the season.

Good luck, and let us know how it goes.
Cheers, Rob
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