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Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

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Re: Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

Postby Vitaliy M. » Wed Apr 03, 2013 7:45 am

WyomingSummits wrote:No. It was directed at people who have never trad led.


Dude, there are not that many sport climbing gumbies on summitpost, and if there were, they wouldn't understand wtf are you talking about, Mr 26. Bagging summits is not very important to those who want to CRUSH v9s. It is more of a peakbagger's site with a few trad climbers mixed in. If you want to school the young post it on rockclimbing.noob or something...
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Re: Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

Postby norco17 » Wed Apr 03, 2013 5:14 pm

Vitality has a point, but again I say
Vitaliy M. wrote:If you want to school the young

then you need to explain why they should use Draw A vs. Draw B. Just telling them to never use Draw A may save a life, but it could cause a lot of broken ankles. All tools have their place. You saying
WyomingSummits wrote:Please, for the love of God, sport and gym climbers please STOP using dogbone quickdraws to clip into trad gear.

is kind of like telling a mechanic to not use a wrench because sockets are faster and you don't want to pay him for more labor than you have to.
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Re: Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

Postby WyomingSummits » Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:45 pm

norco17 wrote:Vitality has a point, but again I say
Vitaliy M. wrote:If you want to school the young

then you need to explain why they should use Draw A vs. Draw B. Just telling them to never use Draw A may save a life, but it could cause a lot of broken ankles. All tools have their place. You saying
WyomingSummits wrote:Please, for the love of God, sport and gym climbers please STOP using dogbone quickdraws to clip into trad gear.

is kind of like telling a mechanic to not use a wrench because sockets are faster and you don't want to pay him for more labor than you have to.


You are 100% correct.....I should have specified certain instances I had in mind. I was kind of trying to avoid a 15 paragraph tutorial. Personally, I avoid using any type of stiff draw on a trad climb, regardless of angle or directness of route. Do people do it? Sure. My reason as stated was unecessesary torque and friction on the route that could cause movement of your placement. Placing a piece properly can mitigate or eliminate that movement, but I still like to use a different type of setup. What I do is use the common technique of using different lengths of more flexible runners from 6" up to 24". having that flex in th runner allows the rope to slide through the piece more freely, especially on a meandering route, which eliminates rope drag and minimalizes placement movement. There are pro's and cons to both. With this system you will have to factor the length of your placement into your possible fall/landing considerations. When placing any type of runner or quickdraw, you have t be aware of the relationship of where that particular length of runner may place you near a ledge or overhang. Full, shoulder length runners seem more versatile to me because you can double them up a get multiple lengths from one piece rather than carry a larger number of pieces. For some climbs this isn't necessary, as you can look at many guides which can give you gear reccomendations or look at the route and realize you only have 200 ft of fairly straightline climbing. For a route that may involve zigzagging across a face, and meandering around columns (wind river range, etc) full length runners allow you to place gear farther apart diagonally, and eliminate the zigzagging rope pattern that causes excess rope tension and friction which can feel really heavy. It also helps you to ensure that you fall forces pull in the direction that you intended when placing your gear. Explaining directional placements I won't get into as a picture is worth more than 100 words. There, maybe that should have been the OP. :)
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Re: Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

Postby Kahuna » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:01 pm

On a side note, "Draws", "Runners" and "Slings" are strength rated above and over the "Pro" they are attached to. In many cases, twice the strength/fail value.

Fact is, and so well exhibited by DMM, one's Pro well indeed rip or fail prior to any of the above in the case of a high energy fall.


Something to remember and always consider when placing "Pro" on very sketchy terrain.
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Re: Trad mistakes by gym/sport climbers

Postby Sierra Ledge Rat » Sun Apr 28, 2013 8:11 pm

I agree with the OP
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