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Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

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Re: Sledge tuning

Postby rhyang » Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:38 pm

These are also referred to as 'pulks'. I no longer use the thing but when I first built one for carrying gear in the winter I took a kid's sled and screwed on some aluminum angles to the bottom, the kind you can get from the hardware store. Then you attach some PVC pipe via cord to a harness or backpack waistbelt. There are various plans on the web for building these things -- I think some boy scout troops even build them for merit badges.

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I gave mine to user erykmynn a few years ago.
Taaaake !
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Re: Sledge tuning

Postby brokesomeribs » Fri Oct 22, 2010 2:48 pm

sjarelkwint wrote:
rhyang wrote:I gave mine to user erykmynn a few years ago.


Problem is I would like to use mine as a sled for coming down, so need to make the thing pretty fast and smooth but also really light and very sturdy due to the breaking system ...


You want to sled.... down Denali? Down the West Butt? HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA. I look forward to reading about you in the news. Either you'll break every speed record, or you'll die. Either way, it will make a great article. Good luck!
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Re: Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

Postby Damien Gildea » Fri Oct 22, 2010 10:21 pm

S

I have ridden my pulk on both Denali and Vinson. It's not such a great idea :)

On Vinson there is a long, gentle slope above BC with a mostly straight track. In later years there are some crevasses near the side, but it's mostly straight. You can really fly down here, which means you can really hurt yourself, which would be really bad in that location, so only an idiot would do it. I did it, but at the time I was more worried about the 20kg bag of half-melted human shit (mine and my partners, I lost the bet) on top of my sled. It was good to wrap my arms around for added security, but it was kinda squishy (sorry Squishy!). If you're sled is at all packed high, there is a chance of turning over and this is bad. You only get less than 1km run, and the route is more than 10km along the glacier, so it's really not worth it.

On Denali, on the lower Kahiltna, if I recall correctly there was only a couple of sections that were OK for it and in the big scheme of things they were so short it is not worth devising any system to try to make it better. Spend your time training to pull the sled rather than ride it. Depending on the year there are also some really big crevasses beside (under? across?) the route so you would not want to go off-course or tumble and roll off the track, or hit the snow at speed, breaking through etc. Given that you would be on or near the track, on a mountain like Denali there is a good chance there will be other climbers on the track. They should not have to get out of the way of some idiot trying to ride his pulk down the hill, or be hit by pieces of that idiot's old green ice-axe flying through the air because his braking system blew apart at the first use. You would have to ride off the track, increasing your chances of going into a crevasse, where those climbers would probably decide to leave you, figuring any idiot who tried to toboggan his bulk down a crevassed glacier was too stupid to live amongst them :D

Unless you trial it in the Alps, which would also be a very bad idea, I doubt there is anywhere else where trialling it on snow will replicate the ice of Denali etc. so your braking system may not be viable. You could, on the other hand, spend that time in snow by learning to ski :wink:
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Re: Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

Postby phlipdascrip » Mon Oct 25, 2010 2:22 pm

How about paddle wheels?

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One wheel left, one right, with individual downhill-grade mountain bike disk brakes for braking and steering, paddles sharp enough to slice up any climber you run over, and a parachute as an emergency brake.

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Re: Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

Postby John Duffield » Mon Oct 25, 2010 3:32 pm

Somewhere, I saw a thread where someone is looking for climbing sponsorship.

Stef, you might team up with them. I think the Producers of "Jackass 4 - Extreme" would be interested. :lol: :lol:

God, I wish I was 25 again. I'd be in it with you! :lol: It's not the takeoff, it's the landing.

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Re: Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

Postby WouterB » Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:10 pm

If you want cheap, why not try a lobotomy.
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Re: Sledge tuning

Postby Day Hiker » Mon Oct 25, 2010 9:39 pm

gbeane wrote:you mean a sled?


That's ok. The entire OP is a write-off. The words "brake" and "steer" were spelled wrong too.
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Re: Sledge/sled/pulka tuning

Postby Brad Marshall » Mon Oct 25, 2010 10:59 pm

sjarelkwint wrote:If this thing might work it would be awesome!
Think about sliding down slopes to 20 miles an hour


We actually do this on Mount Washington, NH down the access trails which can be very steep in sections. We use small 3-foot long sleds and either lay on them face down with crampons on to steer/brake or sit on them and use our feet (without crampons) and hands to do it.
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