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South America Mountaineering Trip Boots...Nepals enough?

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South America Mountaineering Trip Boots...Nepals enough?

Postby golds21 » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:27 pm

I am planning a trip to South America at the end of Nov through Dec. We will be on a few routes in Ecuador and then heading to Argentina to attempt to Aconcagua. Im trying to figure out the boot situation. Right now, the warmest boots I own, and love, are the La Sportiva Nepal EVOs. Ive seen recommendations for plastic double boots, but, who really wears plastic anymore? Im curious if anyone can recommend a tried and true method of ramping up the cold weather rating on the EVOs…super gaitors? Overboots? Am I crazy to think I can get away with the Nepals?

Any and all feedback is welcome! Thanks!
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Postby albanberg » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:35 pm

Spantiks!
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Re: South America Mountaineering Trip Boots...Nepals enough?

Postby ExcitableBoy » Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:23 pm

golds21 wrote:but, who really wears plastic anymore?


Those of us who climb in cold ranges and want to keep all the toes we are born with.
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Postby MRoyer4 » Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:25 pm

Use the search feature or browse the South America forum. There are many many many replies to this exactly question. Short answer: buy a double boot.
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Postby DanTheMan » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:57 pm

You could try the aerogel insoles. http://polarwrap.com/productinfo.aspx?pid=1&product=25. Someone took them up Everest a few years ago, haven't heard much else about them being used for mountaineering. I've been debating beefing up my leather La Sportiva Nepal Tops for Aconcagua normal route with these and maybe some neoprene inside and foot warmers for just in case, they have a lot of room on the inside though. The alternative is hundreds of dollars for new boots.
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Postby WouterB » Mon Sep 20, 2010 11:40 pm

DanTheMan wrote:The alternative is hundreds of dollars for new boots.


The alternative is thousands of dollars for new toes - oh wait, you can't buy new toes... .
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Re: South America Mountaineering Trip Boots...Nepals enough?

Postby Brad Marshall » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:20 am

golds21 wrote:I am planning a trip to South America at the end of Nov through Dec. We will be on a few routes in Ecuador and then heading to Argentina to attempt to Aconcagua. Im trying to figure out the boot situation. Right now, the warmest boots I own, and love, are the La Sportiva Nepal EVOs. Ive seen recommendations for plastic double boots, but, who really wears plastic anymore? Im curious if anyone can recommend a tried and true method of ramping up the cold weather rating on the EVOs…super gaitors? Overboots? Am I crazy to think I can get away with the Nepals?

Any and all feedback is welcome! Thanks!


Can't comment on Ecuador but most people I've seen on Aconcagua wear plastics. This is good for two reasons. First, for the reasons stated above about keeping their toes and secondly, because the mountain is mostly scree and chews up non-plastic boots. Supergaiters may keep the top of your feet warmer but the cold ground may still suck the heat out of your feet. Overboots may not be practicable on most regular routes because you might not wear crampons to the summit depending on conditions. They may work on a route like the Polish Direct but when I was on this route my feet were cold at times even in my plastics with Intuition liners.

I guess the question for you is do you want to gamble all your time, effort, money and toes on boots that may or may not work? Your choice.

P.S. My Koflach Verticals with Intuition liners weigh the same as my Nepals if that's a consideration.
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