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Video from Pennsylvania's highest point

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Postby James_W » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:20 pm

rasgoat wrote:JamesW, Your area looks amazing, I hope one day to be able to live so close to such coolness & have good friends to be there with but, I need to know, do you work for the Canadian tourism council or something?


My roommate does but Canada sells itself ;)
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Postby chugach mtn boy » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:27 pm

James_W wrote:
chugach mtn boy wrote:
James_W wrote: ... the only old growth inland rainforest on earth ...


Say what? I can think of a few others. Heck, there's even a little one in the East, isn't there--uncut parts of the west slope of GSMNP? And then we could assemble quite a list in central Africa ... and there's that river basin in South America, starts with an A I think ...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mount_Reve ... ional_Park

The park contains part of the world's only temperate inland rain forest. Steep, rugged mountains can be found in a warm, moist climate. A variety of plant and animal life is typical with stands of old-growth Western Redcedar and Western Hemlock, a forest type which is rapidly declining outside of protected areas. The park's inland rainforest also has an isolated population of banana slugs which marks the eastern boundary of their distribution in North America.

I see it even on the National Parks documents I have here.


By adding "temperate" I think you get closer to the truth, but I still think it's a slightly extravagant claim. I believe there is inland old growth rain forest around Mt. LeConte and in Cades Cove in the Smokies, and that is temperate. Might find some examples elsewhere, depending on what you count as "inland." None here in Alaska, I'll grant you--ours is all coastal.

As for the East (some, but not all, of which is old growth):
Appalachian temperate rain forests of the eastern USA
Temperate rain forests in the eastern USA are limited to areas in the southern Appalachian Mountains where orographic precipitation causes weather systems coming from the west and from the Gulf of Mexico to drop more precipitation than in surrounding areas. The largest of these forest blocks are located in western North Carolina, northern Georgia, and far eastern Tennessee, largely in the Pisgah, Nantahala, Chattahoochee National Forests and nearby Gorges State Park. In addition, small areas in the highest elevations of the Great Smoky Mountains also receive substantial rainfall, with Clingmans Dome, for example, collecting about 2000 mm of precipitation per year. Although the highest summits of the Green Mountains of Vermont, the White Mountains of New Hampshire, and Mount Katahdin in Maine receive over 2000 mm of precipitation per year, some of these locations have alpine environments and whether or not temperate rain forests exist in these regions is subject to debate. It is possible for small blocks of temperate rainforest to exist along the slopes of these mountain ranges below the tree line where annual precipitation is sufficient for such forests to thrive.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temperate_rainforest#Global_distribution
Last edited by chugach mtn boy on Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby rasgoat » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:33 pm

mrchad9 wrote:
rasgoat wrote:
mrchad9 wrote:If you think 'it's all good' then you obviously have never lived in Houston.


Damn, I just mapquested Big Bend from your location, 9 1/2 hours is alot.

LOL!!!

But not my location! I lived there from 1998-2000. That was enough!


Thank goodness!!!
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Postby James_W » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:35 pm

http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/revels ... tcul9.aspx

I doubt Parks Canada would lie about it.
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Postby simonov » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:37 pm

Castlereagh wrote:Have we really been reduced to pointless pissing matches about whose backyards are better?


This is, after all, the interwebs.
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Postby mrchad9 » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:45 pm

Catamount wrote:It is what it is, gents. No point arguing about the color of the sky ... it's still blue.

Not in Houston:

<img src="http://www.utexas.edu/research/ceer/texaqs/images/hazy_downtown_view.jpg" width="800px">

Image
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Postby chugach mtn boy » Wed Jul 21, 2010 11:47 pm

James_W wrote:http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/bc/revelstoke/natcul/natcul9.aspx

I doubt Parks Canada would lie about it.


:shock: Lord have mercy, they don't even limit it to old growth, they flat out claim they have the "world's only temperate inland rainforest." Being Canadian, they probably think everything south of 48 d 40 m is tropical :roll:

Oh well, there are a few other park systems in the Eastern US, Iran, Azerbaijan, etc who might disagree ...
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Postby MoapaPk » Thu Jul 22, 2010 12:10 am

James_W wrote: an isolated population of banana slugs which marks the eastern boundary of their distribution in North America.



You had me at banana slugs.
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Postby tioga » Thu Jul 22, 2010 3:14 pm

James_W wrote:
tioga wrote:James_W and redneck: What is this bashing of the eastern United States mountains? Have you guys ever even been to Pennsylvania? I bet you would have a different view on the mountains there if you spent some considerable time there. And why are the California mountains suddenly so big? There are mountains in this world that would make them look like mere hills. Note, I am not saying that the California mountains are bad; I have been to California once and really enjoyed the beauty it had to offer. However, I agree with Sarah.Simon that the eastern mountains are a completely different type of mountain than the western mountains.

Also, James_W, I agree that the eastern US mountains may not contain 'ancient' forests, as most of the territory there has been logged over at least once. However, one thing I noticed on that map was that there is considerable more forests in the eastern US compared to the western US. Believe me, it is not all cities, highways, and suburbs out here. Try going to northern Maine, northcentral Pennsylvania, or a number of other places and you will see that the eastern US does indeed have 'wild' areas and beauty. So, again, I stress my first point; spend time in these mountains and you will find the great beauty there.



Born and raised in the east and have seen most of it from northern Ontario to southern Florida. I doubt there is a place you have seen that I have not.


Sorry if it sounded like I was "pissing" but I just don't get it when people try to say that the East is all just a bunch of hills. I grew up in the Mid-Atlantic region (so, even shorter than most of the popular destinations in the East), but I still have a great respect for the mountains there. But I guess it is very much different for each person. If you expect to get the 'awe' feeling that one might get in the High Sierras in the lower mountains of Pennsylvania, then you will probably go away disappointed. There is something else there that keeps bringing me back. Like MoapaPk said, "the woods, even the swamps near home were filled with flowers, wild animals and I was filled with awe." So, I am not disrespecting the western mountains at all (for they are more spectacular, in some ways) but more wondering why people have to delegitimize someone else's experience in the mountains, just because it is in a 'smaller' range. And I don't even think Mt. Davis is the best PA has to offer.

And regarding your quote about the places I have seen; have you been to northcentral PA, specifically the Pennsylvania Grand Canyon (aka. Pine Creek Gorge)? One of my favorites! (though, it wouldn't be canyon-like in the minds of a desert-southwesterner). :lol:

But keep enjoying BC! I hope to visit that area someday. :)
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Postby James_W » Thu Jul 22, 2010 4:24 pm

tioga wrote:There is something else there that keeps bringing me back. Like MoapaPk said, "the woods, even the swamps near home were filled with flowers, wild animals and I was filled with awe


I know the feeling. There are a couple of nice little spots on the Canadian Shield and a forest near Champney falls heading up Chocorua that I always feel the urge to visit again. Also one of the big boulders before you reach the fan in Huntington ravine had me visiting every year.

My comment was more towards the guy scoffing at California's mountains. I can't imagine he would have anything bad to say watching sunrise in front of Temple Crag @ 3rd lake.
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