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Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Sat Dec 18, 2010 9:53 pm
by MoapaPk
The Chief wrote:Do you wear a thin nylon liner sock under the prenes to wick the sweat?

Not usually, I guess that could be the issue. Nylon socks used to chafe my feet, but now that my feet are much more calloused, I'll try again.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:03 pm
by ExcitableBoy
Fire4x4 wrote:What would be good boots for her to get? They would mostly be used for ice climbing. Something warm for standing around but comfortable for a long approach.


If you have the coin then La Sportiva Baturas, Baruntses or Scarpa Phantoms would be really nice. If you are more budget minded a pair of used Koflacks, Scarpa Omegas, Alphas, or Invernos all would be warm and supportive for ice climbing.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 5:12 pm
by The Chief
ExcitibleBoy wrote:..... Scarpa Phantoms would be really nice. If you are more budget minded a pair of used Koflacks, Scarpa Omegas, Alphas, or Invernos all would be warm and supportive for ice climbing.


Those things weigh a ton for vertical water tech ice..... Endurance and Versatility.

There are many boots out there that weigh half of the above, are insulated and vertical water ice climbing specific.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 6:32 pm
by ExcitableBoy
The Chief wrote:
ExcitibleBoy wrote:..... Scarpa Phantoms would be really nice. If you are more budget minded a pair of used Koflacks, Scarpa Omegas, Alphas, or Invernos all would be warm and supportive for ice climbing.


Those things weigh a ton for vertical water tech ice..... Endurance and Versatility.

There are many boots out there that weigh half of the above, are insulated and vertical water ice climbing specific.


Yes they are heavier, but they are warm and affordable which seemed to me to be important to the OP.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Sun Dec 19, 2010 7:23 pm
by JHH60
ExcitibleBoy wrote:
The Chief wrote:
ExcitibleBoy wrote:..... Scarpa Phantoms would be really nice. If you are more budget minded a pair of used Koflacks, Scarpa Omegas, Alphas, or Invernos all would be warm and supportive for ice climbing.


Those things weigh a ton for vertical water tech ice..... Endurance and Versatility.

There are many boots out there that weigh half of the above, are insulated and vertical water ice climbing specific.


Yes they are heavier, but they are warm and affordable which seemed to me to be important to the OP.


Scarpa Invernos are heavier, but not the Omegas. Mine weigh less than my LS Nepals. And based on the quoted weight of the LS Glaciers the OP has, should be lighter than those (and a lot warmer). I just saw the other day that Whittaker Mountaineering is selling used Omegas for $125. Of course, given the fact that Whittaker supplies rental boots for RMI, those have probably been *very* used (and the Omegas aren't as rugged as some plastic boots). It does suggest, however, that you can probably find used Omegas for not too much money.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 1:19 am
by Autoxfil
Invernos. Cheap, climb well enough (better than Glaciers), silly warm.

I got a used pair from Whittaker - the liners were beat up, but not awful. If you catch the right sale Sierra has them for $150, otherwise Whittaker is your best bet.

VBL is also a possible route to making current boots work, and as others said the parka and hat come first.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 1:37 am
by Joe White
ExcitibleBoy wrote:
The Chief wrote:
ExcitibleBoy wrote:..... Scarpa Phantoms would be really nice. If you are more budget minded a pair of used Koflacks, Scarpa Omegas, Alphas, or Invernos all would be warm and supportive for ice climbing.


Those things weigh a ton for vertical water tech ice..... Endurance and Versatility.

There are many boots out there that weigh half of the above, are insulated and vertical water ice climbing specific.


Yes they are heavier, but they are warm and affordable which seemed to me to be important to the OP.


my invernos with intuition liners are not so bad (heavy) and their durability is quite good. That said, I've never climbed in another boot on vertical water ice...and maybe the boots Chief mentioned....are just as warm, durable, and perform better in a vertical environment.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 4:51 am
by SKI
Image

BATURAS

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 3:05 pm
by Sierra Ledge Rat
Maybe it's not her boots.

Hydration plays an extremely important role in circulation. If she's dry, then her feet won't be getting adequate circulation. If she's cool on top of that, the problem is doubled.

I recommend trying to be better hydrated. Bring along a thermos of hot water. Drinking warm water does wonders to warm your feet.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 7:08 pm
by zomarzi
Try these

Don't be fooled by their odd looks! Like all RBH VaprThrm® products the Hi-Rise sock works by blocking evaportive heat-loss keeping heat and moisture from moving into the insulation of the 200 weight Polartec fleece as well as the inner boot. The technology has seen a decade of use in the coldest and highest places on earth.

After repeated requests for custom calf length Insulated Socks we now offer this version which stands 15.5" (a full 4.5" taller than the original). The sole shape is exactly the same for this version as it is for our Vapor Barrier Liner and Insulated Socks. However, the volume in the foot and ankle has been reduced to eliminate folds and pressure points to accomodate lower-volume footwear. This is the ideal sock for telemark boots, snowboarding boots as well as trimmer mountaineering boots. If your calves are larger than 14.5" in circumference you'll want a custom pair to make sure you don't restrict circulation. Please refer to the sizing chart below. If you do not fall within our standard sizing, include your measurements for custom-made socks. Additional $8 charge for custom-sized sole. Additional $8 for customized calf.

The fabric is our patented VaprThrm® insulation with lightweight, soft polyester wicking lining, vapor barrier film and Polartec 200 fleece. Product and materials made in USA. Machine Washable. Color of sock may vary depending on availability of fabric.

Weight 5.6oz per pair for size 9



http://s901.photobucket.com/albums/ac21 ... m%20socks/

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 8:23 pm
by JHH60
The Chief wrote:As far as boots go, I highly rec these...
Image



I've been thinking of getting a pair of these as a Christmas present for myself since Trango S Evo fit me really well. How are these for multiple days of climbing compared to a typical treated leather boot like the Nepal? I've seen comments on the internet that they don't dry out easily overnight but I'm not sure if that information is worth more than the $0 I paid for it.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 10:29 pm
by The Chief
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I know two local folks I climb with on regular basis that have and wear those as their reg ice boots.

They love em.

Contact this young lad kellendv as he has them as well and seems to be very satisfied with them.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Mon Dec 20, 2010 11:40 pm
by Joe White
The Chief wrote:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I know two local folks I climb with on regular basis that have and wear those as their reg ice boots.

They love em.

Contact this young lad kellendv as he has them as well and seems to be very satisfied with them.


How is the durability of those boots? I've had a couple friends who have worn them out quicker than they expected..but they were both guides for an outdoor program which involved a lot of hiking.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 6:34 am
by granite7
Had cold feet for years in Alaska especially while putting up some first winter ascents in the Brooks Range (-50 F). Almost lost some toes to frost bite. So I was serious about finding an answer. Found that if you just buy your boots a size and a half larger than you normally would, put in a good thick wool felt liner under your inner boot , use a thick high quality wool blend sox, and leave room for trapped air (never have tight boots), you should be fine. Its a bit awkward at first, (wearing oversized boots) but you'll get used to it and will appreciate the warm feet.

Re: Cold Feet, New Boots?

PostPosted: Tue Apr 23, 2013 1:04 pm
by splattski
I've had good luck with vapor barriers on Denali and in Idaho's mountains (-20┬░ below). But in warmer boots as well.

Also, be aware that caffeine is a vasoconstrictor, so cut back on the Joe (if that applies).