Welcome to SP!  -
Areas & RangesMountains & RocksRoutesImagesArticlesTrip ReportsGearOtherPeoplePlans & PartnersWhat's NewForum

Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Regional discussion and conditions reports for Washington and Oregon. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the Pacific Northwest Climbing Partners section.
 

Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby ascasson » Sun Apr 08, 2012 12:41 am

Hi folks,

SP has been an extraordinary resource for me -- a pure beginner. I have enough to consume for...well, the rest of my life. But I'd love to get some climbing in this season. Unfortunately I have the newbie tag; I'm sure that's a natural partner deterrent. Or maybe I'm totally wrong, which is great news.

It's tough not having climbing partners; friends interested don't have experience. I'd like to do something with the skills I learn in some upcoming training courses.

Is there anyone with experience interested in climbing any of the Sisters and/or Hood with me?
Can anyone share a story about how they found climbing partners when they started?

Thanks!

Ant
User Avatar
ascasson

 
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby ExcitableBoy » Sun Apr 08, 2012 2:00 am

It was difficult finding experienced partners to climb with when I first started. I found a guy with equal inexperience and and we taught each other the ropes. First top roping at the local crags, then summitting Mt Baker. Eventually I establlished a 'resume' and found it easy to find like minded partners who were eager to rope up with me.

I found it quite irritating when folks found out I used to guide would ask me to take them up Rainier. I would insist upon a regimented training program before stepping foot on the mountain, which they would usually 'be too busy' for. I took the position if these folks who were looking for a free $800 guided trip were unwilling to spend a few afternoons and weekends learning enough skills so they don't get me killed, well they weren't worth wasting my time on. Some newer climbers I invested time in became solid, reliable, and trusted partners with whom I shared many memorable climbs. One guy I taught even made it to the cover of Climbing magazine.

I guess what I am saying, is find a mentor willing to do their part, and go out of your way to do your part. Make it worth your mentor's while. Learn as much as you can by reading Freedom of the Hills, practice Prusiking in a tree in your backyard, learn all the knots, and the theory behind it all. This will go far towards fostering a good mentor/mentee relationship. And offer to drive, pay for gas, after climb beers etc. I think the best folks to look for are 'over the hill climbers', those climbers who are past their sturm and drang years, those who have huge amounts of experience and little left to prove. These folks are usually up for a casual climb and willing to take a newbie out since all the young tigers are out after the hard routes.

Cascadeclimbers.com is a great place to find partners in the PNW. The vast majority of my partners over the last 10 years I have met through that website.

Best of luck

EB
User Avatar
ExcitableBoy

 
Posts: 2841
Joined: Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:33 am
Location: Issaquah, Washington
Thanked: 408 times in 295 posts

The following user would like to thank ExcitableBoy for this post
ascasson

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby Ben Beckerich » Sun Apr 08, 2012 2:58 am

Yep... experienced climbers need to know you're vetted before they'll invite you on anything of consequence. They know the nightmare of getting halfway up a route of commitment to find out you're not fit for it. Screw that noise.

Everything Excitable said is spot on- start reading, practicing, and building a resume. Baby steps. Learn the basics of glacier travel, study an easy route, and drag a FIT friend up it with you. Once you've got a couple summits under your belt, you can post up on Cascade, and odds are, you'll find people willing to climb with you. Probably other noobs, and to do more easy routes, but that's how you break into this sport

Good luck

-Fellow noob
where am i going... and why am i in this handbasket?
User Avatar
Ben Beckerich

 
Posts: 339
Joined: Sun Jan 02, 2011 3:24 am
Location: saint helens, Oregon, OR, United States
Thanked: 61 times in 46 posts

The following user would like to thank Ben Beckerich for this post
ascasson

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby byates » Sun Apr 08, 2012 4:24 am

Find an organization such as the Masama's, how ever its spelled, in your area that have activities and training for beginners. Having been the Hiking director and President of the Wasatch Mountain Club in In Salt Lake City, I have seen many newbie's advance to be great mountaineer's and leaders with proper mentoring through our organization.
User Avatar
byates

 
Posts: 176
Joined: Tue Nov 06, 2007 9:40 pm
Location: Salt Lake, Utah
Thanked: 5 times in 5 posts

The following user would like to thank byates for this post
ascasson

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby ascasson » Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:09 am

Thank you all very much for taking the time to write such thoughtful responses. Seriously... I appreciate it.
User Avatar
ascasson

 
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby Fletch » Sun Apr 08, 2012 6:50 pm

One more thing to add - have a good attitude. That will carry you a long way in finding partners. Even if you find yourself over your head on occasion (and we all do), laughing about it, being a supportive and thoughtful team member, and to be willing to admit a mistake are all qualities that will have you asked back more often than being a jerk with a big resume...

And once you make the move from beginner to intermediate, don't turn your nose up at helping folks that are still in the beginner phase. We were all noobs at one time and it gives you perspective and humility when you don't forget where you (and everyone else) came from.

But from the tone in your post, sounds like you are on your way to finding many partners... it's a filtering process too... takes time!

And if you are around Jun 6-10, I'll be on Hood (and a few others) and would be happy to help out... good luck.
User Avatar
Fletch

 
Posts: 215
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:46 pm
Location: Orange County
Thanked: 85 times in 47 posts

Re: Willingness to Climb with a Beginner

Postby ascasson » Sun Apr 08, 2012 7:10 pm

Fletch wrote:One more thing to add - have a good attitude. That will carry you a long way in finding partners. Even if you find yourself over your head on occasion (and we all do), laughing about it, being a supportive and thoughtful team member, and to be willing to admit a mistake are all qualities that will have you asked back more often than being a jerk with a big resume...

And once you make the move from beginner to intermediate, don't turn your nose up at helping folks that are still in the beginner phase. We were all noobs at one time and it gives you perspective and humility when you don't forget where you (and everyone else) came from.

But from the tone in your post, sounds like you are on your way to finding many partners... it's a filtering process too... takes time!

And if you are around Jun 6-10, I'll be on Hood (and a few others) and would be happy to help out... good luck.



Thanks Fletch! I can relate this to cycling, which has been a major part of my life. My mom was a pro rider through the '90s, and my step dad raced often. I was immersed in the culture early and saw how the most successful individuals (most of the time) also gave back to their community somehow. There are some people below the elite levels who act like freshmen/sophomores in high school -- we're-the-shit mentality. The last thing I want is to turn into an asshole know-it-all who doesn't really know it all. That seems counterproductive; who the heck wants to do anything, climbing or otherwise, with a person like that?

I'll message you about Hood. That timeframe might be a better option for me rather than jamming everything within the next four weeks. And even if I'm not ready to summit, I'd still love to get out there for a taste with cool people. Summiting is a tiny portion of why I'm into this stuff.

- Ant
User Avatar
ascasson

 
Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2012 6:54 pm
Location: Seattle, Washington, United States
Thanked: 2 times in 2 posts


Return to Pacific Northwest (WA, OR)

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

© 2006-2013 SummitPost.org. All Rights Reserved.