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Sherburne Pass Trail

 
Sherburne Pass Trail

Page Type: Route

Location: Vermont, United States, North America

Object Title: Sherburne Pass Trail

Route Type: Hiking

Season: Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter

Time Required: Half a day

Difficulty: Walk Up

Route Quality: 
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Page By: Brian Jenkins

Created/Edited: Oct 18, 2016 / Oct 18, 2016

Object ID: 985598

Hits: 334 

Page Score: 72.08%  - 2 Votes 

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Overview

The Sherburne Pass Trail is the most popular trail to the summit of Pico Peak. Starting from, you guessed it, Sherburne Pass on Route 4, the trail winds up the north side of the peak for 2.7 miles to where it meets the Pico Link Trail at the Pico Camp bunkhouse. From there, the easy trail gets a little more rocky and difficult but is only 0.4 miles to the summit amidst three buildings and the top of a ski lift. Pico is the 6th highest peak in Vermont and is located just north of higher Killington Peak.

View North
 


The trail is spectacular in early October when the leaves are changing with excellent views from the summit of other Green Mountain peaks as well as the Adirondacks to the west. It rises about 1900 feet from the trailhead to the summit and will take an average hiker 2-4 hours to complete round trip. You can combine this trail with a short loop option as well.

Be prepared for crowds as this is a very popular hike. It could be done any time of the year but during ski season, it's best to avoid this one except when the Pico Mountain Ski Resort is closed on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.

Getting There

See the Getting There section of the main page for directions to the trailhead.

Route Description

From the trailhead, head south on the wide trail and sign in at the Register.
Signing the Register
 


The first part of the trail is a pleasant hike through scenic forest.
Orange Trail
 



At the 1.1 mile mark though you will come to a couple of sinkholes. This is called Sink Hole Brook and it disappears into a small pond on the right side of the trail.
Sink Hole Brook
 


At about 2 miles, you will come into the open on a ski run for about 50 yards before the trail takes a left back into the forest.
Trail in the Ski Run
 


At 2.7 miles, you will come to Pico Camp, a bunkhouse with room to sleep 12.
Pico Camp
 



On the right side of the building is a signed trail junction for the Pico Link Trail. Take this turnoff noting it is now only .4 miles to the summit.
Trail Junction
 



The Pico Link climbs up through steeper and rockier terrain before coming to a maintenance road. Cross the road and go slightly left to get back on the trail for a short distance to the summit.
Pico Link Trail
 



You will come out to the top of a ski lift next to an Information/First Aid building.
Top of the Lift and Summit Building
 



Climb the stairs to this building and walk to the back of it and continue to a spot between this and two other buildings. On your right will be a small higher rockier area with a blue painted dot on the highest rock. This is the summit.
Actual Summit
 


If you want excellent views south and west, you can continue to the farthest building from the ski lift and find an almost hidden path behind it that ducks back into the woods. Just a couple minute's walk brings you to a viewpoint to the south, and then farther down the path, a rocky viewpoint to the west.
 
View South
 
 
View Northwest
 














You can either return via the same path you came up, or, if you want to make a short loop, descend down the ski run to the left of the big Pico Peak sign at the summit that has the ski run map on it.
Pico Peak Sign
 



Go down this run until the maintenance road appears on your right. Then, walk the road for a short distance until it comes to the part of the trail where it came out on a ski run for about 50 yards. Head down the path through the middle of the ski run grass to where it ducks into the forest on your right and return to the trailhead.

Essential Gear

Nothing needed in summer. Definitely want a camera in October. If you are hiking in winter, snowshoes would likely be needed. Doubtful you'd need an axe on this mostly gentle trail.

Note that the only water on the trail is at the Sink Hole Brook.

Yellowness
 

External Links

Add External Links text here.

Images

Signing the RegisterActual SummitSink Hole BrookTrail in the Ski Run