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Silvrettahorn
Mountain/Rock

Silvrettahorn

 
Silvrettahorn

Page Type: Mountain/Rock

Location: Vorarlberg, Austria, Europe

Lat/Lon: 46.85820°N / 10.09250°E

Object Title: Silvrettahorn

Elevation: 10643 ft / 3244 m

 

Page By: Lowlands climber

Created/Edited: Apr 10, 2005 / Nov 4, 2005

Object ID: 153916

Hits: 8373 

Page Score: 88.19%  - 26 Votes 

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Overview


The Silvrettahorn is a beautiful rock pyramid that carries the same name at the rugged mountain group that it is part of. At the base of the mountain there are extensive glaciers. It is not the highest mountain of the Silvretta group, but certainly very representative for the shape of many peaks in this area. The summit of the mountain is marked by a large wooden cross. Climbing this mountain is very rewarding in winter as well as in summer, with an interesting glacier tour (crevasses) to start with, and then some rock scrambling over one of the ridges. The panorama from the summit is spectacular. The Silvrettahorn was first climbed by Jacot, Jegen, and Schlegel (1865). There are routes to the summit from the Wiesbadener Hütte in Austria and the Silvrettahütten in Switzerland.


Routes overview


Via the S ridge:
This is a rock scrambling route from the Egghornlücke (3047m) between the Silvrettahorn and the Silvretta-Egghorn. The route follows the S-ridge with some easy climbing (grade I-II; loose rock). The ridge becomes very narrow near the summit. The Egghornlücke can best be reached from the Wiesbadener Hütte (Glacier tour over the Ochsentaler Gletscher). Alternatively, from the Silvrettahütten (Glacier tour over the Silvretta Gletscher, with a short very steep climb to the col; not recommended).

Via the NW ridge:
Easy route over a broad ridge. This route departs from the Silvrettalücke, which can be reached from the SW (Silvretta Gletscher). The Silvrettalücke cannot be gained from the Austrian side without some serious climbing.

Via the W-ridge:
Somewhat more difficult climbing (grade I-II) than the other routes with much loose and bad rock. Not recommended. Route starts from Silvretta Gletscher.

Via the E-ridge:
The german guidebook praises the E-ridge as one of the finest routes of the Silvretta: grade III. But because of melting ice the approach via the Schneeglocken glacier may be tricky.

Climbing base


From the Austrian side the Wiesbadener Hütte (2443m) is a good starting point. The Silvrettahorn together with Piz Buin dominate the view from the front of the Wiesbadener Hütte. The Wiesbadener Hütte can be reached by a signposted track from Bieler Höhe (3 hours walk). Bieler Höhe has bus connections to Galtür and further to Landeck. Phone: ++43 (0) 5558 4233. Website: http://www.wiesbadener-huette.com/

On the Swiss side the Silvrettahütten is the best climbing base. There is a signposted path to the hut from Klosters (5-5.5 hours walk). Klosters has a railway station. Phone: +41 (0)81 422 13 06 Website: http://www.sac-stgallen.ch/huetten/silvretta.htm

Getting There


From the Austrian side the best starting point to walk to the Wiesbadener Hütte is Bieler Höhe (2036m). This is a broad water shed between the Montafon valley to the NW and the Paznaun valley to the NE. A road passes over the Bieler Höhe (Silvretta Hochalpstrasse) that connects the cities Bludenz (NW) and Landeck (NE). There is a parking at the Bieler Höhe, but also a bus connection to Galtür and further to Landeck at the end of the Paznaun valley. Landeck can be reached by train from Innsbruck, which has an airport.

From the Swiss side the best starting point to walk to the Silvrettahütten is Klosters, which is on the train line between Davos and Landquart. Landquart connects further by frequent fast train services (1-2 hrs traveling time at most) to the cities Chur and Zürich (the latter with airport). See for bus and train connections the CFF website: http://www.cff.ch/ . Alternatively, by car from Zürich take the motorway 3 to Chur and exit at Landquart and follow the road 28 to Klosters.

Red Tape


No permits required, no summit fees.

When To Climb


This mountain can be climbed all year round. However, winter climbs require a much bigger effort than climbs in summer. Contact the Wiesbadener Hütte for guiding details in winter or look in "Bergtouren und Hüttenübergange in der Silvretta vom Madlenerhaus und der Wiesbadener Hütte. 1996, DAV"

Camping


There are a few campings and many hotels in the Prattigau and Paznaun valleys.

Mountain Conditions


Weather
http://www.alpenverein.at/wetter/index.asp

Miscellaneous Info


Maps
Alpenvereinskarte Blatt 26 Silvrettagruppe (1:25:000)
LKS map 249 Tarasp (1:50:000)

Books
Günther Flaig. Silvretta Alpenvereinsführer alpin. 11th edition 1996, Rother, München ISBN 3-7633-1097-5

Bergtouren und Hüttenübergange in der Silvretta vom Madlenerhaus und der Wiesbadener Hütte. 1996, DAV Wiesbaden.

Additions and Corrections

[ Post an Addition or Correction ]
Viewing: 1-18 of 18    
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Mathias, can you give me the reference to the German guidebook, so I can add to the book list? Thanks, Jan.
Posted Apr 14, 2005 3:01 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

You already listed the guidebook by Flaig of 1996 - I don't know what is written there about the east ridge. My book is a previous edition:


Walter Flaig, Alpenvereinsfuehrer Silvretta, Bergverlag Rother Munich, 10th edition 1987
Posted Apr 14, 2005 3:19 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Thanks,


I see. The author has actually removed the E-ridge from the book. All routes above grade II have actually been removed from the new version.
Posted Apr 14, 2005 4:23 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

done, thanks.
Posted Oct 4, 2005 4:21 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

hmm - you only inserted 2 numbers behind the decimal point. Is there a reason for this?
Posted Oct 28, 2005 12:42 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Yes, there is a reason for this. This is related to one of my professional deformations :-).





It relates to how you determined the coordinates . If these were really determined on the spot by triangulation or military quality GPS (or from a list of coordinates added to the map) I would be in favor of more than 2 decimals.





However if you got them from a cursor reading from a digital map, than there is of course a measurement error. That is why is used two decimals to start with. So if you can be more specific on the way you obtained the coordinates from the map I would be willing to add more decimals.


Posted Nov 3, 2005 4:57 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

hmm - I believe that the coordinates from digital map are more accurate that 2 decimals.


A major feature for the coordinates is the correct setting for the summit symbol on the "interactive map" on the left bar. Clicking on it shows that now the summit symbol is placed somewhere between Silvrettahorn and Schneeglocke.


I don't know how much decimals you need for this - but surely more than two.
Posted Nov 4, 2005 12:47 am
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

ok, sounds convincing.
Posted Nov 4, 2005 6:33 am
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

the german guidebook praises the E-ridge as one of the finest routes of the Silvretta: UIAA III. But because of melting ice the approach via the Schneeglocken glacier may be tricky
Posted Apr 13, 2005 4:24 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Mathias, can you give me the reference to the German guidebook, so I can add to the book list? Thanks, Jan.
Posted Apr 14, 2005 3:01 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

You already listed the guidebook by Flaig of 1996 - I don't know what is written there about the east ridge. My book is a previous edition:


Walter Flaig, Alpenvereinsfuehrer Silvretta, Bergverlag Rother Munich, 10th edition 1987
Posted Apr 14, 2005 3:19 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Thanks,


I see. The author has actually removed the E-ridge from the book. All routes above grade II have actually been removed from the new version.
Posted Apr 14, 2005 4:23 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

are not fully correct: I took these one from digital Alpenvereinskarte map:


46.858222 N


10.0925278 E
Posted Oct 3, 2005 12:16 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

done, thanks.
Posted Oct 4, 2005 4:21 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

hmm - you only inserted 2 numbers behind the decimal point. Is there a reason for this?
Posted Oct 28, 2005 12:42 pm
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

Yes, there is a reason for this. This is related to one of my professional deformations :-).





It relates to how you determined the coordinates . If these were really determined on the spot by triangulation or military quality GPS (or from a list of coordinates added to the map) I would be in favor of more than 2 decimals.





However if you got them from a cursor reading from a digital map, than there is of course a measurement error. That is why is used two decimals to start with. So if you can be more specific on the way you obtained the coordinates from the map I would be willing to add more decimals.


Posted Nov 3, 2005 4:57 pm
Mathias ZehringUntitled Comment

Mathias Zehring

Voted 10/10

hmm - I believe that the coordinates from digital map are more accurate that 2 decimals.


A major feature for the coordinates is the correct setting for the summit symbol on the "interactive map" on the left bar. Clicking on it shows that now the summit symbol is placed somewhere between Silvrettahorn and Schneeglocke.


I don't know how much decimals you need for this - but surely more than two.
Posted Nov 4, 2005 12:47 am
Lowlands climberUntitled Comment

Lowlands climber

Hasn't voted

ok, sounds convincing.
Posted Nov 4, 2005 6:33 am

Viewing: 1-18 of 18    

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