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View West from Mount Lovenia

 
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View West from Mount Lovenia
Distant Wasatch Mountains dominate the left skyline, followed on the right by half-shaded Agassiz, white Spread Eagle, and dark twin-top Ostler. Directly in front of this majestic trio of twelvers are shady North faces of Deadhorse and Yard peaks.

The wide tundra valley of West Fork Blacks Fork is visible across the lower ridge of Red Knob Pass in the foreground. Dead Horse pass and Allsop Pass lead out of West Fork. A deep saddle of Rocky Sea Pass is visible far to the left, silhouetted against the backdrop of Central Wasatch.

East Lovenia - Lovenia Loop, 10/8/2008 1:50pm

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Viewing: 1-7 of 7    

imontopWhat a place huh?

imontop

Voted 10/10

I love the Lovenia area! The Lake Fork and Deadhorse area is probably the most remote area in the Uintas. And your picture definately demonstrates that.
Posted Nov 24, 2008 8:49 pm

Dmitry PrussRe: What a place huh?

Dmitry Pruss

Hasn't voted

I think mid-section of KE Ridge is a good deal more remote. Lovenias are a passable day trip but later in October I hiked through Atwood Basin and it was a toughie mileage-wise. But South Side basins like Lake Fork may be darn hard to reach too!
Posted Nov 24, 2008 10:04 pm

imontopRe: What a place huh?

imontop

Voted 10/10

Good point. South of Kings toward Emmons is remote. That would be a hell of a pull up Lake Fork toward Lovenia.
Posted Nov 24, 2008 11:58 pm

yatsekTypical Utah huh?

yatsek

Voted 10/10

I'd love to visit; too few trees for me again though, another E Altaj - just cover it with snow - does it get enough for cross-country skiing?
Posted Nov 25, 2008 2:16 am

Dmitry PrussRe: Typical Utah?

Dmitry Pruss

Hasn't voted

No it isn't a prarie-to-tundra tree-less range, not at all. The Uintas are set in the heart of more than 50 x 100 miles swath of timber country. So much forest that backpackers often complain of not seeing much for like days (check Scott's description of Yellowstone River Trail for example).
And it gets plenty of snow, often skiable November through June. The problem with xc ski access in the middle of the winter is not with the amount of snow. The problem is with the closed roads and winter trailheads which are typically very very far from the mountains.
Posted Nov 25, 2008 1:23 pm

yatsekRe: Typical Utah?

yatsek

Voted 10/10

I see, so it wouldn't be so bad for me although I'd be tempted to move a bit north anyway. When it comes to very very far - no good for, say, little dogs but this is something just right for aliens like MOCKBA, isn't it?
Posted Nov 27, 2008 6:39 am

Dmitry PrussSkiing you say? Preaching to the choir

Dmitry Pruss

Hasn't voted

LOL this year was my first year of serious hiking in the High Uintas, but I've been skiing there since mid-90s, and all of my High Uintas trip reports on SP are for ski tours.

There is a caveat though. All of these trips were day trips (sometimes with car camp or off a yurt). But Lovenia area isn't doable in one day on skis. When the snow is good, it's over 50 miles round trip, and by the time the summer trailheads open up, the snow ain't good any more.
Posted Nov 27, 2008 1:40 pm

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Image Data
Dmitry PrussSubmitted by Dmitry Pruss
on Nov 24, 2008 6:34 pm

Image ID: 466052
Hits: 1127 
Lat/Lon: 40.75690°N / 110.6074°W
Object Title: View West from Mount Lovenia

Image Type(s): Hiking