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Zoroaster Temple, Northeast Arête
Route

Zoroaster Temple, Northeast Arête

 
Zoroaster Temple, Northeast Arête

Page Type: Route

Location: Arizona, United States, North America

Lat/Lon: 36.05720°N / 112.1375°W

Object Title: Zoroaster Temple, Northeast Arête

Route Type: Rock Climb

Time Required: A few days

Difficulty: 5.8+

Route Quality: 
 - 4 Votes
 

 

Page By: Jack Daniels

Created/Edited: Nov 11, 2002 / Aug 21, 2003

Object ID: 157310

Hits: 9678 

Page Score: 73.06%  - 3 Votes 

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Approach


Summit Elevation is 7128 feet.

Clear Creek Trail to Sumner Wash, then cross country to the obvious break in the Red Wall. Getting up this break involves a small amount of class 4 scrambling. A reasonably well ducked climbers' path then heads up to the base of the route, just above the Zoroaster - Brahma Temple Saddle. There are a few short class 4 steps and some exposure along this path.

There is usually no water past Phantom Ranch, so typically the approach involves moving water from there to the bivy site, either in the Clear Creek area or above the Red Wall in the Cheyava zone.

Zoroaster Temple has has been climbed in under 24 hours South Rim to South Rim. But with over 30 miles and more than 10,000' of elevation gained and lost, plus the inevitable temperature extremes of the canyon, most parties will need 3-4 days.


Route Description


P1: Start the climb at an obvious reddish rockfall scar. Move up over or around to the right of a small roof (5.7/5.8) and then follow a lower angled groove to a tree with a bunch of slings.

P2: Wander up a short pitch (5.8) to a nice flat ledge with more slings.

P3: Follow a right leaning crack system (5.6) to an alcove. Then a short stem/chimney (5.8) leads to more fixed slings just below the obvious roof.

P4: Traverse right across a poorly protected slab (5.7) past one bolt and up an easy chimney to a ledge below the final crack.

P5: Climb the short crack which widens for a body length to a 4" pod that can be jammed with your hands and heel-toed with your outer foot.

From the top of this pitch, walk around the left of the summit cap and scramble up an easy class 3/4 chimney to the summit.

Rappel the route.

For more information including topos, see Rock Climbing Arizona (Falcon Press) and Rock & Ice, No. 64.


Essential Gear


Standard rack of gear to 3". Optionally include one 4" piece for the pitch 5 pod. Double 50m ropes are needed to rappel. 60m ropes are not necessary. Also, the usual canyon stuff, including lots of water bottles.

Miscellaneous Info


Minimal route descriptions:

http://www.arizonas-vertical-web.com/GrandCanyon/ZoroasterTemple.shtml

http://www.rockclimbing.com/routes/listSection.php?SectionID=4772

Two trip reports:

http://groups.google.com/groups?selm=333984A5.41C67EA6%40saifr00.ateng.az.honeywell.com&rnum=8

http://lomaprieta.sierraclub.org/pcs/articles/zoroaster.asp

Additions and Corrections

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Viewing: 1-3 of 3    
rpcRoute Comment

rpc

Hasn't voted

might consider posting this as a separate mountain instead of as part of GCNP. Very cool looking route.


rpc
Posted Nov 11, 2002 3:53 pm
Steven CrossRoute Comment

Steven Cross

Hasn't voted

I highly agree, I have considered adding it myself, but do not have any info in it, or have not done it, so have not added it. this could make a very good page by itself.
Posted Nov 15, 2002 4:49 pm
JohnRoute Comment

John

Hasn't voted

I think SP2 will handle this better. In SP2, we'll be able to have "climbing areas" so we would have something like:





Area > Formation > Route





For this particular case it would be:





Grand Canyon > Zoroaster Temple > Northeast Arête





The same way we would have say:





City of Rock > Elephant Rock > Rye Crisp


Castle Crags > Mount Hubris > Cosmic Wall


Zion > Temple of Sinawava > Moonlight Buttress





I don't have a problem with Zoroaster Temple being listed part of the GCNP (afterall, it is physically in the GCNP) or having it's own Mountain Page. To me, using the main GC page as is the case now follows the Third Pillar of Dana precedent. In either case, I think the GC should be recognized as a climbing / scrambling area - in addition to a hiking / mule-riding area.
Posted Nov 15, 2002 7:36 pm

Viewing: 1-3 of 3    

Images

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