Creiglyn Dyfi

Creiglyn Dyfi which sits under the summit of Aran Fawddwy is the source of the ecologically important Afon Dyfi. (January 2007)

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Andino

Andino - Jul 18, 2007 3:55 pm - Voted 10/10

Bravo !

Very nice perspective ;o)

Nanuls

Nanuls - Jul 21, 2007 2:19 pm - Hasn't voted

Re: Bravo !

Thankyou, I love this spot it always catches the snow, a rare thing in Wales!

Aspen

Aspen - Aug 16, 2007 10:47 pm - Voted 10/10

Bottomless Pit

It truly does look like a bottomless pit! Welcome to the Cold Heart of Hell!! *evil laugh* Mwwhahahaha!!!

Knight

Nanuls

Nanuls - Aug 17, 2007 8:59 am - Hasn't voted

Re: Bottomless Pit

now your worrying me!

Cheers
Dan

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 26, 2008 8:40 am - Voted 10/10

The Senses

The area looks handsome, clad in thin white, with this black hole. Does it sound more or less like this:

kreiglin divi @ æræn vauðwi ?

Nanuls

Nanuls - Nov 26, 2008 11:10 am - Hasn't voted

Re: The Senses

Thanks very much! And your pronounciation is so close too. The first word should be more like Duvi.

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 26, 2008 11:49 am - Voted 10/10

Re: the u

U mean U as in "put", or the vowel in "fur/fir"?

Nanuls

Nanuls - Nov 26, 2008 11:58 am - Hasn't voted

Re: the u

oh sorry I'm so used to the language I don't even think about these things - as in 'fur' or 'furrow', or 'fun'.

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 26, 2008 2:23 pm - Voted 10/10

Re: Tough Fun

It's usually complicated no matter you're used to the language or not:-) As to the English sounds and signs representing them, I'm used to the so called RP, i.e. "BBC" version. The problem is that it has the same sound/sign for the vowel in both "fun/bus" and "love/tough", while in N England the former sounds like "put" (this U is quite close to the Polish U).

So, to sum up, is your/our U like the vowel sound in "foot" (or at least closer to the one in "foot" than to that in "rough/done')?



Nanuls

Nanuls - Nov 27, 2008 6:33 am - Hasn't voted

Re: Tough Fun

Nnothing like foot, 'U' sounds like a short 'ee', as in 'seen'; never as in 'cup'.

Does that make sense?

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 27, 2008 7:25 am - Voted 10/10

Re: dYfi

Hope I'm getting warmer:-) So now my guess is it must be something close to the most common vowel sound in English ("schwa"= ә ):
climbEr, barrEn, pencIl, murmUr, cOnsensUs
???

Nanuls

Nanuls - Nov 27, 2008 8:09 am - Hasn't voted

Re: dYfi

Right! your getting it - 'Y' in Welsh is (normally) like the 'U' in murmur or consensus in English; and 'U' in Welsh is like the sound 'ee' in Engish like in keen or deep.

Just to complicate things 'Y' in certain Welsh words is sometimes also prononounced as an 'ee', but there aren't many uses of this. The most common it 'ty' which means house.

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 27, 2008 9:56 am - Voted 10/10

Re: U & I LOL

Aha! Right, now we're done with the sound, time to deal with the letter U: as there's no roof over it, the sound shouldn't be longer than that of the letter I. Do both of them sound alike then?

Nanuls

Nanuls - Nov 27, 2008 10:29 am - Hasn't voted

Re: U & I LOL

Yes, that's it, they both sound alike! Nice one, I should have probably said somthing like that earlier... sorry!

yatsek

yatsek - Nov 27, 2008 12:02 pm - Voted 10/10

Re: U & I LOL

That's OK, Dan. I do like sorting out problems. Perhaps just different examples or some international signs for non-native English speakers would do.
Diolch yn fawr,
Jacek

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