Kane Gulch

Page Type Page Type: Route
Additional Information Route Type: Hiking
Seasons Season: Spring, Fall
Additional Information Time Required: Most of a day
Additional Information Difficulty: Class 1-2
Sign the Climber's Log

Overview

Kane Gulch is by far the most popular entry into Grand Gulch. The route is easy, and class 2, but one ledge can be dicey in winter if it is covered with ice. The one way distance to Grand Gulch is 3.8 miles.

Getting There

This area can be reached from the east from Blanding and along Highway 95, from the west and Hite along Highway 95, or from the south via Highway 261 and Mexican Hat, or Highway 47 north from Bluff. Make sure to have a good roadmap before heading into this area. The closest town with gas is Blanding, about 40 miles away from the upper trailheads.

Kane Gulch is located four miles south of the Highway 95/Highway 261 junction and is right near mile marker 29. Kane Gulch is also where the ranger station for the Grand Gulch Primitive area is, so just about everyone stops here for information. It is also necessary to stop here for overnight permits for the high season.

Route Description

From the ranger station, cross the highway and locate the trail on the west side. This well used trail follows Kane Gulch as it slowly deepens into a sandstone canyon. Not far from the beginning of the route, you will pass through some nice groves of aspen, which is quite a surprise in the desert country. Not far below the aspens are a few Douglas fir trees.

As the canyon deepens, keep an eye out on the south wall for some hidden ruins. The route down Kane Gulch becomes a bit steep in places, but is easy, save when icy when one ledge can be dicey. After 3.8 miles, you will reach the bottom of Grand Gulch in a nice grove of cottonwood trees. The extensive Junction Ruin is just up Grand Gulch.

Junction RuinJunction Ruin

Essential Gear

A good pair of boots and plenty of water is required. Don't forget your camera.


Geography
Parents 

Parents

Parents refers to a larger category under which an object falls. For example, theAconcagua mountain page has the 'Aconcagua Group' and the 'Seven Summits' asparents and is a parent itself to many routes, photos, and Trip Reports.