Beginner Advice please :)

Regional discussion and conditions reports for Europe. Please post partners requests and trip plans in the Europe Climbing Partners section.
User Avatar
visentin

 
Posts: 1442
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 12:27 pm
Thanked: 88 times in 58 posts

by visentin » Tue Dec 08, 2009 8:37 am

I would start climbing the mountains in UK. There are tons of mountains in Wales and Scotland, smaller than Ben Nevis but technically more challenging.
I understand your fascination for the "tallests" (Mont Blanc, etc) but this philosophy is not always the most rewarding

User Avatar
BrunoM

 
Posts: 228
Joined: Wed Jun 17, 2009 6:07 pm
Thanked: 3 times in 1 post

by BrunoM » Tue Dec 08, 2009 9:59 am

Plenty of more (hard) things to do in Scotland, and if you've done all of those, do them in winter!

User Avatar
visentin

 
Posts: 1442
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 12:27 pm
Thanked: 88 times in 58 posts

by visentin » Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:34 pm

hifi87 wrote:Cheers guys, I think I'll organise a few munro's next month and in the spring.
I read a report about climbing in scotland in winder and spring and it mentioned using crampons and ice axes, am i likley to need these?


I've hiked a couple of munros in winter and I'd say yes, in most cases (except thick soft snow, where snowshoes may be more appropriate), you'll need this gear. In some bad periods of the winter (January, February) you must also be aware that there might be not possibility at all to go to mountains...

User Avatar
John Climber

 
Posts: 231
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2005 1:04 pm
Thanked: 0 time in 0 post

Progress in getting experience

by John Climber » Sun Dec 13, 2009 8:28 pm

Yes, I agree with the rest of the SPosters...Go progressively and step by step. Firstly get used to normal hikes in the UK and also learn to do them in winter conditions.

Try to get a competent walking-partner who wants to teach you all the technnics of this sport. To be fit is not the most important, but to do the right things, and to know not to get in troubles (and if you are in them, how to go out of them)....

Get help of some professionals in the alps, doing some mountaineering courses, on the glaciers...learn how to do trekkings through the big mountains in the Alps...before you get to the tops...

When you go topping, firstly learn how to do it on the easiest 3000ers, and then on the easiest 4000ers...

You can beging to do sport-climbing top-roping indoor. Then learn how to lead easy routes (always under the level you can climb top-roping,...)

This, if you are doing it good, will take some time...even years of practise and expertise...in a couple of intensive training you'll be ready!

Good luck and best whises..

User Avatar
peterd

 
Posts: 22
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 4:01 pm
Thanked: 1 time in 1 post

by peterd » Mon Dec 14, 2009 7:27 pm

hifi87 wrote:Cheers guys, I think I'll organise a few munro's next month and in the spring.

I read a report about climbing in scotland in winder and spring and it mentioned using crampons and ice axes, am i likley to need these?


If you go walking or climbing in Scotland in winter you should take an ice axe and crampons, and know how to use them! Maybe try a winter skills course?


Return to Europe

 


  • Related topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests