cilogear customer service?

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albanberg

 
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by albanberg » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:15 am

anita wrote: I finally wore it on a route this weekend and my arms are still sore from where the straps were digging into them.


I don't think this should happen. You might want to look at their online manual or call them to figure out the fit. I don't have that size pack but my 60 liter pack does not have this issue at all.

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The Chief

 
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by The Chief » Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:36 am

I have five VAUDE packs of different designs and four of em are over 10 years old. Each one has tons and tons of hours/days of use and abuse. Not one has failed nor have I even had to contemplate contacting VAUDE for any assistance in service for any of these packs. I know three other locals that swear by em as well. (They use to be distributed outta Mammoth.) Now that is a quality made pack. Oh, they are 1/3 the price of CILO stuff.

If CILO Packs are so bombproof, why are so many folks in need to contact Graham?

BTW: You best bet that if I pay over 600 smackers for damn pack, it better be fkng indestructible! It better also make my coffee in the morning.

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welle

 
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by welle » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:59 pm

The Chief wrote:
BTW: You best bet that if I pay over 600 smackers for damn pack, it better be fkng indestructible! It better also make my coffee in the morning.


Dana Gleason is actually back in the pack-making biz - yoohoo! His packs are damn indestructible and carry weight well. If I didn't have my Dana Design packs (original Bozeman made), I'd be splurging on Mystery Ranch packs.

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The Chief

 
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by The Chief » Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:35 pm

welle wrote:
The Chief wrote:
BTW: You best bet that if I pay over 600 smackers for damn pack, it better be fkng indestructible! It better also make my coffee in the morning.


Dana Gleason is actually back in the pack-making biz - yoohoo! His packs are damn and carry weight well. If I didn't have my Dana Design packs (original Bozeman made), I'd be splurging on Mystery Ranch packs.


+1!

My bigass load hauler (7800 cu.in. 80lbs plus) that I still use is an original DD Terraplane! Now that frkn thing is truly indestructible and a class act design! When I bought it in '99 it cost me $248.00 brand new (MSRP) from Mtn Tools.
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Dow Williams

 
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by Dow Williams » Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:54 pm

The Chief wrote:I have five VAUDE packs of different designs and four of em are over 10 years old. Each one has tons and tons of hours/days of use and abuse. Not one has failed nor have I even had to contemplate contacting VAUDE for any assistance in service for any of these packs. I know three other locals that swear by em as well. (They use to be distributed outta Mammoth.) Now that is a quality made pack. Oh, they are 1/3 the price of CILO stuff.

If CILO Packs are so bombproof, why are so many folks in need to contact Graham?

BTW: You best bet that if I pay over 600 smackers for damn pack, it better be fkng indestructible! It better also make my coffee in the morning.


could not agree more, spot on Rick

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CClaude

 
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by CClaude » Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:06 pm

Butt bag, aka Fish Rumpsac.... when you are working a multipitch route and the belay consists of a 1" ledge at most (especially if the wall is overhanging) and the belay goes for more then 1 or 2 hours, sitting in the harness starts to suck.

http://www.fishproducts.com/catalog/productlinefs.html

the rumpsac packs up small (I also have a homemade bosun's chair but for back country it sucks to carry) and is more compfy multi-hour belays

also for full disclosure, I'm also cheap. my expedition pack is WildThings Alpinista pack from 1995, shorter stuff is a Black Diamond Predator 50, my back country cragging pack is a North Face Fulcrum 35 and my day in/day out cragging pack is a A5 mini haul bag I bought in the 1990's which is industructable.
Last edited by CClaude on Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:22 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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ExcitableBoy

 
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by ExcitableBoy » Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:11 pm

dps wrote:It always blows my mind that people expect Cilogear packs to be indestructible. I've seen so many BD, Osprey, etc... packs fall apart under "normal" use in alpinism. This is not a problem unique to Cilogear packs and the double standard that consumers apply never ceases to surprise me.


I honestly don't think I have a double standard. My buddy destroyed 3 Cilogear packs in three years. He is a single father of two kids and a manager at Microsoft, not a full time dirt bag climber. He gets out occasionally and yet his Cilogear packs seem to disintegrate spontaneously. I've watched it happen.

I have owned two BD Packs over the last 10 years (Ice 45L and Shadow 45L) which I paid $90 each on sale. I have used each one extensively for about 5 years each and the only damage that occurred was from rodents chewing on the packs and cuts to the pack body caused by my stupidity - tossing in sharp ice screws without the protective caps. No stitching or zippers or straps ever failed.

By my standard, a boutique pack costing twice as much as a production pack should be at least as durable. Is that a double standard?

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Alpinisto

 
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by Alpinisto » Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:55 pm

Figgered I'd throw my two cents in:

I bought a couple CiloGear packs off ePay last year and they didn't come with a complete set of compression/load lifting straps. I shot an e-mail off to Graham explaining the situation, and he responded in a timely manner (within a day or two) and we exchanged several e-mails back and forth, he answering some questions I had about the packs and he also put together a custom set of straps for me that differed from the standard set of auxilliary straps. I found Graham and Michael (the other guy who responded to some of my e-mails) to be friendly and helpful, especially toward somebody who only spent $20 on a set of straps. Remember, I bought their products on the secondhand market -- they didn't have the advantage of making a profit from my purchase of the packs, yet I felt that they treated me as if I had bought directly from them.

Fletch, reading your post I did not get the sense you were busting on CiloGear...to the contrary, I think your criticism is both valid and constructive. What others have posted in this thread is true: Graham runs a small shop and is (evidently) cranking out as many packs as he can. While this is encouraging (better than him having little or no sales), if the focus on production/fulfillment detracts from customer service/response, then there is the real possibilty of lost/foregone sales, as shown by your example.

While, as climbers, we applaud "one of our own" making some of the kick-assiest packs out there, sticking a #4 Camalot in the eye of some other formerly-good-gear-companies-that-have-sold-out-and-now-outfit-college-coeds-in-the-latest-fleece-fashions (metaphorically speaking), the challenges of being a small, 5-or-so person shop are painfully evident in threads like these.

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Kai

 
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by Kai » Wed Sep 22, 2010 7:09 pm

I don't have any affiliation at all with Cilo Gear.

Never met Graham in person.

My only connection with the company is that I've purchased 2 Cilo Gear packs.

My experience with the company has been mostly positive. The only negative thing I can say is that once, it took Graham a while to get back to me when I had a question about the packs. I have to say, that when I did reach him, he spent at least 20 minutes on the phone with me, discussing the various differences between the pack models and helping me figure out which one was best for my uses.

I have called and emailed a couple of times since my purchase asking questions, and Graham has always gottem back to me.

As to durability, my experience with my first Cilo pack (a 45L worksack) was very good. It stood up to being heavily overloaded, and dragged up and down mountains. I liked it so much that I sold it, and bought the same pack in the new non woven dyneema fabric. I don't know how well the new non-woven dyneema fabric pack will hold up, as it's still new, but I have no complaints with the regular version I used for several years.

That said, these are lightweight packs. It is not reasonable to expect them to hold up to abrasion and abuse as well as packs made from heavy duty cordura fabrics. If the stitching fails, then that would be something that I would look to Graham to take care of, but if I wear through the lightweight fabric because I'm doing a lot of chimney-ing on rough granite, I guess I'd figure that this is one of the drawbacks of using lightweight gear.

I have some "bomb proof" climbing packs made from heavy fabrics. I'm willing to sacrifice some durability in return for lighter weight. If you want a highly abrasion resistant pack, you probably don't want a Cilo pack (or you need to cough up the $$$ for one of their Spectra fabric packs.)

Personally, I'm glad that there are companies out there like Cilo Gear. I like the fact that they make lightweight gear that is tailored for the ultralight market. I like the fact that when I contact them, I am communicating with the owner and the designer of the equipment. I will continue to support companies like Cilo Gear, Brooks Range, and others like them. They make products that the bigger companies can't or won't, and often, these niche products are just what I'm looking for.

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ExcitableBoy

 
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by ExcitableBoy » Wed Sep 22, 2010 8:48 pm

dps wrote:
The internet is a wonderful tool, but the hyperbole gets a bit old. That doesn't mean criticism should be ignored, but there is a point where it just becomes white noise as opposed to something meaningful. Having a direct conversation with your friend who has had issues with the packs instead of your pontification would be much more insightful.


I don't think 'hyperbole' and 'pontification' mean what you think they do.

dps wrote:How exactly are you defining "boutique"?


From Dictionary.com: "a small business, department, etc., specializing in one aspect of a larger industry"

What exactly are you a graduate student in? Hopefully not English.

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fossana

 
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by fossana » Wed Sep 22, 2010 9:38 pm

anita wrote:fossana: thanks for the tip, I'll check their site

for the record, I'm not ragging on cilogear, just trying to get in touch with someone. the 40b I bought off sp has been pretty good for carrying lots of stuff on approaches and hikes, in all 4 seasons. I finally wore it on a route this weekend and my arms are still sore from where the straps were digging into them.

my fave pack is still my 5 yr old arcteryx borea. that pack has taken a beating and is still looking great.


NP, Anita.

My best climbing pack is my 7 year old Arc'teryx Khamsin. I think it's time to start using it again.

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