Kids and Climbing/Hiking

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SoCalHiker

 
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Kids and Climbing/Hiking

by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:23 pm

I used to take my kids to my hiking trips as often as possible. While they were 1 and 2 years old I carried them to the top of Yosemite Falls on my back. For the next few years they loved to go hiking with me and seemed to enjoy it whenever it got more "challenging", which means when there was some sort of climbing/scrambling involved. But in the last few years they started to "hate" hiking/climbing or anything that involves a lot of walking. They are now 13 (girl) and 11 (boy) years old. One of the last rare outings was a few years ago, which they seemed to enjoy as long as there was scrambling (see photos).

Image
Image

Now I really would like them to get more interested in it again since I think they are old enough to hike with me (of course age-appropriate).

I am sure that is an issue that many of you have encountered and hopefully overcome and resolved. I would appreciate any advice.

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by butitsadryheat » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:36 pm

I prefer to drag them out in the middle of the night, so they are groggy, and then withhold food and water until they comply :lol:

Mine are 11 and 14 also (well, in just a couple weeks and months respectively) and have whined on almost all trips until there was something to look at. They always look back and enjoy them though, and it gets easier and easier.
I think now that most kids are too attached to the electronics, and don't want to put them down.

Good luck!

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:42 pm

butitsadryheat wrote:
I think now that most kids are too attached to the electronics, and don't want to put them down.

Good luck!


:) I completely agree with that sentiment. Thanks.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:44 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:Find the parts of your adventures that DOES entice them, then entice them with that.



That's what I am trying to do, find routes with a minimal "boring" approach but fun adventure "stuff". But it's a drag.

Thanks Dingus. I always envied your pictures and reports with your kids.

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by SpiderSavage » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:49 pm

I've been through 3 kids this way plus plenty of Boy Scouts, who dropped out.

Ask them what they want to do and try to deliver it.

Most kids can't tell you where they want to go even though they've been there. They don't keep track of where they are and what places are called. I handle this by asking questions like, "Would you like to go to the Forest? River? Lake? Have them describe the landscape they would like to see.

Part of my success was due to convincing my whole family to willingly give up cable television in the early 1990's. I would read to my kids from adventure books like Harry Potter then translate that into real life adventures. My son and I once did a "Lord of the Rings" overnight hike up Millard Canyon carrying only a blanket, some lembas (power bar) and a few magic items like lighter and flashlight. My grown children thank me repeatedly for freeing them from the slave box.

The problem with TV is it tells you what to do. Constant suggestions that you must have this or that act as "suggestions" that eventually take hold of the mind no matter how much you resist.

There is much much more but I'm not writing a book right now.

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by liferequiresair » Mon Feb 08, 2010 9:58 pm

Candy!!

My parents dragged my brother and I up so many trails with
"Another piece of candy at the next corner."

Just don't force them... too much. They'll thank you later.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:27 pm

SpiderSavage wrote:I've been through 3 kids this way plus plenty of Boy Scouts, who dropped out.

Ask them what they want to do and try to deliver it.

Most kids can't tell you where they want to go even though they've been there. They don't keep track of where they are and what places are called. I handle this by asking questions like, "Would you like to go to the Forest? River? Lake? Have them describe the landscape they would like to see.

Part of my success was due to convincing my whole family to willingly give up cable television in the early 1990's. I would read to my kids from adventure books like Harry Potter then translate that into real life adventures. My son and I once did a "Lord of the Rings" overnight hike up Millard Canyon carrying only a blanket, some lembas (power bar) and a few magic items like lighter and flashlight. My grown children thank me repeatedly for freeing them from the slave box.

The problem with TV is it tells you what to do. Constant suggestions that you must have this or that act as "suggestions" that eventually take hold of the mind no matter how much you resist.

There is much much more but I'm not writing a book right now.


Thanks so much. I cancelled our television as of last year. They still find ways to "sneek" on my computer and watch everything online. It's a good idea just to ask them what type of outdoor they find interesting at any given time. I think they both want to learn fishing. As a matter of fact I hope that will last as I like to go to the Eastern Sierra to fish too.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:29 pm

liferequiresair wrote:Candy!!

My parents dragged my brother and I up so many trails with
"Another piece of candy at the next corner."

Just don't force them... too much. They'll thank you later.


That's what I hope they will do in many years from now. It's just that it often takes all the pleasure I usually have when listening to the endless complaining.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:30 pm

Dingus Milktoast wrote:
SoCalHiker wrote:
Dingus Milktoast wrote:Find the parts of your adventures that DOES entice them, then entice them with that.



That's what I am trying to do, find routes with a minimal "boring" approach but fun adventure "stuff". But it's a drag.

Thanks Dingus. I always envied your pictures and reports with your kids.


Forget about the routes. Jus take them out Adventurneering, and let the trails come to you!

DMT


Yeah, I think I should just focus only on the "fun" part and not worry about the route aspect of it. Thanks again.

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by Vladislav » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:35 pm

Good topic and posts!

I have been wondering the same thing. My daughter is now a year and a half. She has already "climbed" two SPS peaks and a lot of smaller hills. She loves to be outdoors. Still I realize the challenge that lies ahead. I realize that at some point it will be much much harder to convince her to join me for a walk in the hills. I am already thinking hard about what I should do to keep her interested.
This is also a part of a larger question of raising kids without them becoming dependent on all the electronic paraphernalia of mordern life.
We don't have a TV. We keep the number of electronic devices at home to a bare minimum. Most of her toys do not make annoying sounds and do not flash with multicolored lights. We read a lot to her and tell her stories. Still sometimes I think we are not doing enough...
I am thinking about creating a sort of a challenge for her to keep her interested in sports and outdoors. Like climbing all SPS peaks or learning to play tennis well enough to beat her dad, etc. She already is a member of SP: http://www.summitpost.org/user_page.php?user_id=59924 Sometimes I am afraid I am overdoing it.
I would love to hear more from people with older kids. What works and what doesn't? Should I try harder to steer her the way I think is best or will it only turn her away from all this when adolescence rolls in? As in everything, it is so hard to strike the right balance. Share your stories, please!

Vlad.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:40 pm

Dougb wrote:I think the key is figuring out what THEY like, not what we (parents) like and go with that.


Yeah, thanks. I guess that's the right attitude.

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by SoCalHiker » Mon Feb 08, 2010 10:44 pm

Vladislav wrote:Good topic and posts!

I have been wondering the same thing. My daughter is now a year and a half. She has already "climbed" two SPS peaks and a lot of smaller hills. She loves to be outdoors. Still I realize the challenge that lies ahead. I realize that at some point it will be much much harder to convince her to join me for a walk in the hills. I am already thinking hard about what I should do to keep her interested.
This is also a part of a larger question of raising kids without them becoming dependent on all the electronic paraphernalia of mordern life.
We don't have a TV. We keep the number of electronic devices at home to a bare minimum. Most of her toys do not make annoying sounds and do not flash with multicolored lights. We read a lot to her and tell her stories. Still sometimes I think we are not doing enough...
I am thinking about creating a sort of a challenge for her to keep her interested in sports and outdoors. Like climbing all SPS peaks or learning to play tennis well enough to beat her dad, etc. She already is a member of SP: http://www.summitpost.org/user_page.php?user_id=59924 Sometimes I am afraid I am overdoing it.
I would love to hear more from people with older kids. What works and what doesn't? Should I try harder to steer her the way I think is best or will it only turn her away from all this when adolescence rolls in? As in everything, it is so hard to strike the right balance. Share your stories, please!

Vlad.


Well I guess that's another important topic. I am trying to infuse them the love for the outdorors and hoping that they will join me eventually and gratefully on many trips but I don't want to "over-do" it. I guess it's a fine line between "pushing" them to get outdoor and "forcing" them to do something they really don't want to.

Thanks.

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